Weekly litigation report — March 31, 2018

Trial court strikes down Seattle’s rule banning landlords from selecting their own tenants PLF asks Supreme Court to clarify “temporary” takings law Florida ends Walton County’s unconstitutional land grab PLF … ›

#MarksMadness

PLF filed a friend of the court brief in the Supreme Court of the United States a few months ago, in Hughes v. United States, and the Court heard oral … ›

All men are created equal

This is the sixth part in a series discussing the principles of the American founding, their embodiment in the United States Constitution, and the ways in which the Supreme Court … ›

Photo by Tom Frick

What is an “existing structure” under the California Coastal Act?

For landowners along California’s coast, maintaining the right to build a seawall or other protective device can mean the difference between preserving one’s home or having it fall into the … ›

Weirdest Alcohol Laws: Real or Fake? Two Lawyers Quiz Each Other

Man, there are some WEIRD alcohol laws out there. Real, actual lawyers Anastasia Boden of Pacific Legal Foundation and Jarrett Dieterle of R Street Institute play a drinking game: Is … ›

Victory in PLF’s challenge to Seattle’s “implicit bias” rule

Today, a trial judge ruled that Seattle can’t deny landlords the right to choose their own tenants. Seattle’s “first in time” rule forced landlords to offer any vacant unit to the … ›

Don’t tread on happy hour

Today we filed this First Amendment lawsuit arguing that the government can’t censor truthful, non-misleading speech—even if it has to do with :: gasp:: alcohol. In Virginia, it’s perfectly legal to … ›

All rights were created equal

This is the fifth part in a series discussing the principles of the American founding, their embodiment in the United States Constitution, and the ways in which the Supreme Court … ›

How many times can California violate the law? At least 231.

The government doesn’t usually admit that it has failed to follow the law. Yet the California Department of Fish and Wildlife did just that, and acknowledged that it has failed … ›

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Weekly litigation report — March 31, 2018

Trial court strikes down Seattle’s rule banning landlords from selecting their own tenants PLF asks Supreme Court to clarify “temporary” takings law Florida ends Walton County’s unconstitutional land grab PLF … ›

#MarksMadness

PLF filed a friend of the court brief in the Supreme Court of the United States a few months ago, in Hughes v. United States, and the Court heard oral … ›

All men are created equal

This is the sixth part in a series discussing the principles of the American founding, their embodiment in the United States Constitution, and the ways in which the Supreme Court … ›

Photo by Tom Frick

What is an “existing structure” under the California Coastal Act?

For landowners along California’s coast, maintaining the right to build a seawall or other protective device can mean the difference between preserving one’s home or having it fall into the … ›

Weirdest Alcohol Laws: Real or Fake? Two Lawyers Quiz Each Other

Man, there are some WEIRD alcohol laws out there. Real, actual lawyers Anastasia Boden of Pacific Legal Foundation and Jarrett Dieterle of R Street Institute play a drinking game: Is … ›

Victory in PLF’s challenge to Seattle’s “implicit bias” rule

Today, a trial judge ruled that Seattle can’t deny landlords the right to choose their own tenants. Seattle’s “first in time” rule forced landlords to offer any vacant unit to the … ›

Don’t tread on happy hour

Today we filed this First Amendment lawsuit arguing that the government can’t censor truthful, non-misleading speech—even if it has to do with :: gasp:: alcohol. In Virginia, it’s perfectly legal to … ›

All rights were created equal

This is the fifth part in a series discussing the principles of the American founding, their embodiment in the United States Constitution, and the ways in which the Supreme Court … ›

How many times can California violate the law? At least 231.

The government doesn’t usually admit that it has failed to follow the law. Yet the California Department of Fish and Wildlife did just that, and acknowledged that it has failed … ›

The Morning Docket

Stay up to date with the Morning Docket, a weekly highlight of PLF's best articles, videos, and podcasts.

Weekly litigation report — March 31, 2018

Trial court strikes down Seattle’s rule banning landlords from selecting their own tenants PLF asks Supreme Court to clarify “temporary” takings law Florida ends Walton County’s unconstitutional land grab PLF … ›

#MarksMadness

PLF filed a friend of the court brief in the Supreme Court of the United States a few months ago, in Hughes v. United States, and the Court heard oral … ›

All men are created equal

This is the sixth part in a series discussing the principles of the American founding, their embodiment in the United States Constitution, and the ways in which the Supreme Court … ›

Photo by Tom Frick

What is an “existing structure” under the California Coastal Act?

For landowners along California’s coast, maintaining the right to build a seawall or other protective device can mean the difference between preserving one’s home or having it fall into the … ›

Weirdest Alcohol Laws: Real or Fake? Two Lawyers Quiz Each Other

Man, there are some WEIRD alcohol laws out there. Real, actual lawyers Anastasia Boden of Pacific Legal Foundation and Jarrett Dieterle of R Street Institute play a drinking game: Is … ›

Victory in PLF’s challenge to Seattle’s “implicit bias” rule

Today, a trial judge ruled that Seattle can’t deny landlords the right to choose their own tenants. Seattle’s “first in time” rule forced landlords to offer any vacant unit to the … ›

Don’t tread on happy hour

Today we filed this First Amendment lawsuit arguing that the government can’t censor truthful, non-misleading speech—even if it has to do with :: gasp:: alcohol. In Virginia, it’s perfectly legal to … ›

All rights were created equal

This is the fifth part in a series discussing the principles of the American founding, their embodiment in the United States Constitution, and the ways in which the Supreme Court … ›

How many times can California violate the law? At least 231.

The government doesn’t usually admit that it has failed to follow the law. Yet the California Department of Fish and Wildlife did just that, and acknowledged that it has failed … ›

Weekly litigation report — March 31, 2018

Trial court strikes down Seattle’s rule banning landlords from selecting their own tenants PLF asks Supreme Court to clarify “temporary” takings law Florida ends Walton County’s unconstitutional land grab PLF … ›

#MarksMadness

PLF filed a friend of the court brief in the Supreme Court of the United States a few months ago, in Hughes v. United States, and the Court heard oral … ›

All men are created equal

This is the sixth part in a series discussing the principles of the American founding, their embodiment in the United States Constitution, and the ways in which the Supreme Court … ›

Photo by Tom Frick

What is an “existing structure” under the California Coastal Act?

For landowners along California’s coast, maintaining the right to build a seawall or other protective device can mean the difference between preserving one’s home or having it fall into the … ›

Weirdest Alcohol Laws: Real or Fake? Two Lawyers Quiz Each Other

Man, there are some WEIRD alcohol laws out there. Real, actual lawyers Anastasia Boden of Pacific Legal Foundation and Jarrett Dieterle of R Street Institute play a drinking game: Is … ›

Victory in PLF’s challenge to Seattle’s “implicit bias” rule

Today, a trial judge ruled that Seattle can’t deny landlords the right to choose their own tenants. Seattle’s “first in time” rule forced landlords to offer any vacant unit to the … ›

Don’t tread on happy hour

Today we filed this First Amendment lawsuit arguing that the government can’t censor truthful, non-misleading speech—even if it has to do with :: gasp:: alcohol. In Virginia, it’s perfectly legal to … ›

All rights were created equal

This is the fifth part in a series discussing the principles of the American founding, their embodiment in the United States Constitution, and the ways in which the Supreme Court … ›

How many times can California violate the law? At least 231.

The government doesn’t usually admit that it has failed to follow the law. Yet the California Department of Fish and Wildlife did just that, and acknowledged that it has failed … ›