Can government force you to pay for your political opponents' campaign contributions?

Last Friday, the National Review published my op-ed on PLF’s case challenging Seattle’s new-fangled campaign finance scheme. Seattle’s democracy voucher program gives four $25 vouchers to each Seattle resident per … ›

Why the separation of powers matters for racial equality

In high school, I spent hours hunkered at a library computer playing Sid Meier’s Civilization instead of working on the school newspaper. In the game, you could lead your own civilization from stone age to space … ›

Supreme Court victory for innocent property owners

Last week, the Supreme Court scored a victory for liberty in Nelson v. Colorado. Until last Wednesday, a Colorado defendant exonerated of a criminal conviction had to prove their own innocence … ›

In Seattle, social justice trumps fundamental rights

Yesterday, the Seattle Times ran my op-ed about our lawsuit challenging a Seattle law that forbids landlords from choosing their own tenants. In Yim v. City of Seattle, we argue that the … ›

Social justice matters, but not at the expense of property rights

At the start of the year, Seattle became the first city to forbid landlords from choosing their own tenants. A group of small-time landlords, represented by Pacific Legal Foundation, has … ›

Is tolerated freedom really freedom at all?

More and more, we have to receive government permission to exercise basic rights. This subverts a fundamental notion of liberty: first comes freedom, then comes government to secure that freedom. We’ve … ›

Can government regulate your subconscious?

Today, we filed a legal challenge against Seattle’s heavy-handed attempt to squash its residents’ “unconscious bias.” A new Seattle ordinance forbids landlords from choosing their own tenants in a sweeping … ›

Bureaucratic overreach and the separation of powers

Can federal agencies make up whatever policies they like unless Congress tells them not to? PLF answered an emphatic “no” in an amicus brief filed today to support a petition … ›

Public schools need reform, not more money

In the recent confirmation hearing held for Betsy DeVos, President Trump’s pick for Secretary of Education, Democrats fulminated over public school funding. “Can you commit,” Senator Patty Murray asked, “that … ›

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Can government force you to pay for your political opponents' campaign contributions?

Last Friday, the National Review published my op-ed on PLF’s case challenging Seattle’s new-fangled campaign finance scheme. Seattle’s democracy voucher program gives four $25 vouchers to each Seattle resident per … ›

Why the separation of powers matters for racial equality

In high school, I spent hours hunkered at a library computer playing Sid Meier’s Civilization instead of working on the school newspaper. In the game, you could lead your own civilization from stone age to space … ›

Supreme Court victory for innocent property owners

Last week, the Supreme Court scored a victory for liberty in Nelson v. Colorado. Until last Wednesday, a Colorado defendant exonerated of a criminal conviction had to prove their own innocence … ›

In Seattle, social justice trumps fundamental rights

Yesterday, the Seattle Times ran my op-ed about our lawsuit challenging a Seattle law that forbids landlords from choosing their own tenants. In Yim v. City of Seattle, we argue that the … ›

Social justice matters, but not at the expense of property rights

At the start of the year, Seattle became the first city to forbid landlords from choosing their own tenants. A group of small-time landlords, represented by Pacific Legal Foundation, has … ›

Is tolerated freedom really freedom at all?

More and more, we have to receive government permission to exercise basic rights. This subverts a fundamental notion of liberty: first comes freedom, then comes government to secure that freedom. We’ve … ›

Can government regulate your subconscious?

Today, we filed a legal challenge against Seattle’s heavy-handed attempt to squash its residents’ “unconscious bias.” A new Seattle ordinance forbids landlords from choosing their own tenants in a sweeping … ›

Bureaucratic overreach and the separation of powers

Can federal agencies make up whatever policies they like unless Congress tells them not to? PLF answered an emphatic “no” in an amicus brief filed today to support a petition … ›

Public schools need reform, not more money

In the recent confirmation hearing held for Betsy DeVos, President Trump’s pick for Secretary of Education, Democrats fulminated over public school funding. “Can you commit,” Senator Patty Murray asked, “that … ›

The Morning Docket

Stay up to date with the Morning Docket, a weekly highlight of PLF's best articles, videos, and podcasts.

Can government force you to pay for your political opponents' campaign contributions?

Last Friday, the National Review published my op-ed on PLF’s case challenging Seattle’s new-fangled campaign finance scheme. Seattle’s democracy voucher program gives four $25 vouchers to each Seattle resident per … ›

Why the separation of powers matters for racial equality

In high school, I spent hours hunkered at a library computer playing Sid Meier’s Civilization instead of working on the school newspaper. In the game, you could lead your own civilization from stone age to space … ›

Supreme Court victory for innocent property owners

Last week, the Supreme Court scored a victory for liberty in Nelson v. Colorado. Until last Wednesday, a Colorado defendant exonerated of a criminal conviction had to prove their own innocence … ›

In Seattle, social justice trumps fundamental rights

Yesterday, the Seattle Times ran my op-ed about our lawsuit challenging a Seattle law that forbids landlords from choosing their own tenants. In Yim v. City of Seattle, we argue that the … ›

Social justice matters, but not at the expense of property rights

At the start of the year, Seattle became the first city to forbid landlords from choosing their own tenants. A group of small-time landlords, represented by Pacific Legal Foundation, has … ›

Is tolerated freedom really freedom at all?

More and more, we have to receive government permission to exercise basic rights. This subverts a fundamental notion of liberty: first comes freedom, then comes government to secure that freedom. We’ve … ›

Can government regulate your subconscious?

Today, we filed a legal challenge against Seattle’s heavy-handed attempt to squash its residents’ “unconscious bias.” A new Seattle ordinance forbids landlords from choosing their own tenants in a sweeping … ›

Bureaucratic overreach and the separation of powers

Can federal agencies make up whatever policies they like unless Congress tells them not to? PLF answered an emphatic “no” in an amicus brief filed today to support a petition … ›

Public schools need reform, not more money

In the recent confirmation hearing held for Betsy DeVos, President Trump’s pick for Secretary of Education, Democrats fulminated over public school funding. “Can you commit,” Senator Patty Murray asked, “that … ›

Can government force you to pay for your political opponents' campaign contributions?

Last Friday, the National Review published my op-ed on PLF’s case challenging Seattle’s new-fangled campaign finance scheme. Seattle’s democracy voucher program gives four $25 vouchers to each Seattle resident per … ›

Why the separation of powers matters for racial equality

In high school, I spent hours hunkered at a library computer playing Sid Meier’s Civilization instead of working on the school newspaper. In the game, you could lead your own civilization from stone age to space … ›

Supreme Court victory for innocent property owners

Last week, the Supreme Court scored a victory for liberty in Nelson v. Colorado. Until last Wednesday, a Colorado defendant exonerated of a criminal conviction had to prove their own innocence … ›

In Seattle, social justice trumps fundamental rights

Yesterday, the Seattle Times ran my op-ed about our lawsuit challenging a Seattle law that forbids landlords from choosing their own tenants. In Yim v. City of Seattle, we argue that the … ›

Social justice matters, but not at the expense of property rights

At the start of the year, Seattle became the first city to forbid landlords from choosing their own tenants. A group of small-time landlords, represented by Pacific Legal Foundation, has … ›

Is tolerated freedom really freedom at all?

More and more, we have to receive government permission to exercise basic rights. This subverts a fundamental notion of liberty: first comes freedom, then comes government to secure that freedom. We’ve … ›

Can government regulate your subconscious?

Today, we filed a legal challenge against Seattle’s heavy-handed attempt to squash its residents’ “unconscious bias.” A new Seattle ordinance forbids landlords from choosing their own tenants in a sweeping … ›

Bureaucratic overreach and the separation of powers

Can federal agencies make up whatever policies they like unless Congress tells them not to? PLF answered an emphatic “no” in an amicus brief filed today to support a petition … ›

Public schools need reform, not more money

In the recent confirmation hearing held for Betsy DeVos, President Trump’s pick for Secretary of Education, Democrats fulminated over public school funding. “Can you commit,” Senator Patty Murray asked, “that … ›