New paper highlights importance of New Jersey sports gambling case

The Competitive Enterprise Institute’s Michelle Minton has a new paper highlighting the importance of the Supreme Court ruling the right way in New Jersey’s challenge to the Professional and Amateur … ›

Georgia Supreme Court Upholds Anti-Competitive Law

On Monday, the Georgia Supreme Court issued its opinion in Women’s Surgical Center v. Berry, a case that challenged Georgia’s anti-competitive Certificate of Need (“CON”) laws. Certificate of Need laws, … ›

Oklahoma cannot stop American Indian artists from calling their art American Indian-made

For over 30 years, Peggy Fontenot has made, displayed, and sold American Indian art, often traveling the country to participate in American Indian art shows and festivals. Her specialty is … ›

Public comment reopened for federal wine labeling regulations

Over a year ago, I wrote about a pending federal Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) regulation that would remove certain common-sense labeling exceptions for wines sold within a … ›

New Jersey goes all in on the Constitution in sports betting case

Can Congress dictate to states what their own laws must be? Anyone familiar with federalism will likely immediately say “no.” Our Founders drafted a Constitution that preserved the independence of the the states, believing that dividing power between the federal government and the states would be a bulwark to protect our liberty. To preserve the Founders’ design, the Supreme Court has said that the federal government cannot “commandeer” the states by requiring them to adopt or enforce federal policy.

Yet the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act, passed by Congress in 1992, purports to tell most states—but not others—that they must forbid sports gambling. In particular, it forbids states from “authorizing” sports betting “by law,” which means that those states that forbade sports betting in 1992 must continue doing so forever. That’s unconstitutional.

Weekly litigation report — August 19, 2017

Environmentalists warn of catastrophic sun-darkening on Monday! Support for the Supreme Court to toss Michigan’s theft by tax-forclosure scheme Widespread support for “absent frog” case in Supreme Court And widespread concern for … ›

Nashville Airbnb case continues

Back in October we reported that Nashville homeowners Rachel and P.J. Anderson had prevailed in their challenge to Nashville’s restrictive and unconstitutional limitation on short-term rentals. Unfortunately, instead of doing … ›

Ease occupational licensing, free people to work

Today we filed this comment letter with the FTC describing how easing occupational licensing would give Americans a pathway to prosperity.  The FTC has assembled an Economic Liberty Taskforce dedicated to addressing … ›

Occupational de-licensing in Connecticut

Earlier this week Connecticut removed occupational licensing, registration, and certificate requirements for several professions. The de-licensing of an occupation is especially notable because of its rarity. A 2015 study authored by Dr. Robert … ›

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New paper highlights importance of New Jersey sports gambling case

The Competitive Enterprise Institute’s Michelle Minton has a new paper highlighting the importance of the Supreme Court ruling the right way in New Jersey’s challenge to the Professional and Amateur … ›

Georgia Supreme Court Upholds Anti-Competitive Law

On Monday, the Georgia Supreme Court issued its opinion in Women’s Surgical Center v. Berry, a case that challenged Georgia’s anti-competitive Certificate of Need (“CON”) laws. Certificate of Need laws, … ›

Oklahoma cannot stop American Indian artists from calling their art American Indian-made

For over 30 years, Peggy Fontenot has made, displayed, and sold American Indian art, often traveling the country to participate in American Indian art shows and festivals. Her specialty is … ›

Public comment reopened for federal wine labeling regulations

Over a year ago, I wrote about a pending federal Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) regulation that would remove certain common-sense labeling exceptions for wines sold within a … ›

New Jersey goes all in on the Constitution in sports betting case

Can Congress dictate to states what their own laws must be? Anyone familiar with federalism will likely immediately say “no.” Our Founders drafted a Constitution that preserved the independence of the the states, believing that dividing power between the federal government and the states would be a bulwark to protect our liberty. To preserve the Founders’ design, the Supreme Court has said that the federal government cannot “commandeer” the states by requiring them to adopt or enforce federal policy.

Yet the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act, passed by Congress in 1992, purports to tell most states—but not others—that they must forbid sports gambling. In particular, it forbids states from “authorizing” sports betting “by law,” which means that those states that forbade sports betting in 1992 must continue doing so forever. That’s unconstitutional.

Weekly litigation report — August 19, 2017

Environmentalists warn of catastrophic sun-darkening on Monday! Support for the Supreme Court to toss Michigan’s theft by tax-forclosure scheme Widespread support for “absent frog” case in Supreme Court And widespread concern for … ›

Nashville Airbnb case continues

Back in October we reported that Nashville homeowners Rachel and P.J. Anderson had prevailed in their challenge to Nashville’s restrictive and unconstitutional limitation on short-term rentals. Unfortunately, instead of doing … ›

Ease occupational licensing, free people to work

Today we filed this comment letter with the FTC describing how easing occupational licensing would give Americans a pathway to prosperity.  The FTC has assembled an Economic Liberty Taskforce dedicated to addressing … ›

Occupational de-licensing in Connecticut

Earlier this week Connecticut removed occupational licensing, registration, and certificate requirements for several professions. The de-licensing of an occupation is especially notable because of its rarity. A 2015 study authored by Dr. Robert … ›

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New paper highlights importance of New Jersey sports gambling case

The Competitive Enterprise Institute’s Michelle Minton has a new paper highlighting the importance of the Supreme Court ruling the right way in New Jersey’s challenge to the Professional and Amateur … ›

Georgia Supreme Court Upholds Anti-Competitive Law

On Monday, the Georgia Supreme Court issued its opinion in Women’s Surgical Center v. Berry, a case that challenged Georgia’s anti-competitive Certificate of Need (“CON”) laws. Certificate of Need laws, … ›

Oklahoma cannot stop American Indian artists from calling their art American Indian-made

For over 30 years, Peggy Fontenot has made, displayed, and sold American Indian art, often traveling the country to participate in American Indian art shows and festivals. Her specialty is … ›

Public comment reopened for federal wine labeling regulations

Over a year ago, I wrote about a pending federal Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) regulation that would remove certain common-sense labeling exceptions for wines sold within a … ›

New Jersey goes all in on the Constitution in sports betting case

Can Congress dictate to states what their own laws must be? Anyone familiar with federalism will likely immediately say “no.” Our Founders drafted a Constitution that preserved the independence of the the states, believing that dividing power between the federal government and the states would be a bulwark to protect our liberty. To preserve the Founders’ design, the Supreme Court has said that the federal government cannot “commandeer” the states by requiring them to adopt or enforce federal policy.

Yet the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act, passed by Congress in 1992, purports to tell most states—but not others—that they must forbid sports gambling. In particular, it forbids states from “authorizing” sports betting “by law,” which means that those states that forbade sports betting in 1992 must continue doing so forever. That’s unconstitutional.

Weekly litigation report — August 19, 2017

Environmentalists warn of catastrophic sun-darkening on Monday! Support for the Supreme Court to toss Michigan’s theft by tax-forclosure scheme Widespread support for “absent frog” case in Supreme Court And widespread concern for … ›

Nashville Airbnb case continues

Back in October we reported that Nashville homeowners Rachel and P.J. Anderson had prevailed in their challenge to Nashville’s restrictive and unconstitutional limitation on short-term rentals. Unfortunately, instead of doing … ›

Ease occupational licensing, free people to work

Today we filed this comment letter with the FTC describing how easing occupational licensing would give Americans a pathway to prosperity.  The FTC has assembled an Economic Liberty Taskforce dedicated to addressing … ›

Occupational de-licensing in Connecticut

Earlier this week Connecticut removed occupational licensing, registration, and certificate requirements for several professions. The de-licensing of an occupation is especially notable because of its rarity. A 2015 study authored by Dr. Robert … ›

New paper highlights importance of New Jersey sports gambling case

The Competitive Enterprise Institute’s Michelle Minton has a new paper highlighting the importance of the Supreme Court ruling the right way in New Jersey’s challenge to the Professional and Amateur … ›

Georgia Supreme Court Upholds Anti-Competitive Law

On Monday, the Georgia Supreme Court issued its opinion in Women’s Surgical Center v. Berry, a case that challenged Georgia’s anti-competitive Certificate of Need (“CON”) laws. Certificate of Need laws, … ›

Oklahoma cannot stop American Indian artists from calling their art American Indian-made

For over 30 years, Peggy Fontenot has made, displayed, and sold American Indian art, often traveling the country to participate in American Indian art shows and festivals. Her specialty is … ›

Public comment reopened for federal wine labeling regulations

Over a year ago, I wrote about a pending federal Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) regulation that would remove certain common-sense labeling exceptions for wines sold within a … ›

New Jersey goes all in on the Constitution in sports betting case

Can Congress dictate to states what their own laws must be? Anyone familiar with federalism will likely immediately say “no.” Our Founders drafted a Constitution that preserved the independence of the the states, believing that dividing power between the federal government and the states would be a bulwark to protect our liberty. To preserve the Founders’ design, the Supreme Court has said that the federal government cannot “commandeer” the states by requiring them to adopt or enforce federal policy.

Yet the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act, passed by Congress in 1992, purports to tell most states—but not others—that they must forbid sports gambling. In particular, it forbids states from “authorizing” sports betting “by law,” which means that those states that forbade sports betting in 1992 must continue doing so forever. That’s unconstitutional.

Weekly litigation report — August 19, 2017

Environmentalists warn of catastrophic sun-darkening on Monday! Support for the Supreme Court to toss Michigan’s theft by tax-forclosure scheme Widespread support for “absent frog” case in Supreme Court And widespread concern for … ›

Nashville Airbnb case continues

Back in October we reported that Nashville homeowners Rachel and P.J. Anderson had prevailed in their challenge to Nashville’s restrictive and unconstitutional limitation on short-term rentals. Unfortunately, instead of doing … ›

Ease occupational licensing, free people to work

Today we filed this comment letter with the FTC describing how easing occupational licensing would give Americans a pathway to prosperity.  The FTC has assembled an Economic Liberty Taskforce dedicated to addressing … ›

Occupational de-licensing in Connecticut

Earlier this week Connecticut removed occupational licensing, registration, and certificate requirements for several professions. The de-licensing of an occupation is especially notable because of its rarity. A 2015 study authored by Dr. Robert … ›