Yes, President Trump Can Replace Richard Cordray with an Acting Director

On Friday, Richard Cordray resigned as director of the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau. Today, two people are claiming to be the lawful acting director of the CFPB.

Endangered Species Act Bureaucrats Are Playing Word Games That Cost Billions Of Dollars

The government’s environmental scientists must start behaving more like real scientists and less like politicized bureaucrats. We all need to know—we all deserve to know—what they mean by the words they use.

Seattle’s Income Tax on ‘the Rich’ Has Collateral Damage: The Poor

Once again, a “progressive” plan turns out, in practice, to operate more like the Sheriff of Nottingham than Robin Hood.

Feds turn flood insurance into a tool for land grabs in Oregon

When zoning and planning decisions are made for your community, which level of government should make the call?

Solution to rockweed harvesting should be rooted in privacy rights

The future of the abundant rockweed growing along Maine’s coast may turn on one of our country’s oldest ideas: property rights.

The Supreme Court should restore federalism to its rightful place. Utah’s prairie dogs depend on it.

This weekend, Senator Mike Lee of Utah and I had an article in the Wall Street Journal urging the Supreme Court to hear People for the Ethical Treatment of Property Owners v. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Why is Maryland imposing absurd regulations on entrepreneurs?

While most states are busy unleashing their entrepreneurs to create jobs and innovative services, Maryland is bucking the trend.

Federal court issues mixed decision on jaguar critical habitat challenge

In 2014, the federal government designated thousands of acres in New Mexico as “critical habitat” for the jaguar. The designation is absurd, because jaguars prefer the wet, tropical climates of Central and South America forests, to the dry, arid wilderness of the Southwest.

Yes, Trump can revoke national monuments

The Washington Post has published my op-ed defending the President’s power to revoke existing national monuments. Several months ago, President Trump ordered a review of the last 21 years of monument designations. For good reason, the evidence is indisputable that abuse of the monument power has been far worse the last few years.

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Yes, President Trump Can Replace Richard Cordray with an Acting Director

On Friday, Richard Cordray resigned as director of the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau. Today, two people are claiming to be the lawful acting director of the CFPB.

Endangered Species Act Bureaucrats Are Playing Word Games That Cost Billions Of Dollars

The government’s environmental scientists must start behaving more like real scientists and less like politicized bureaucrats. We all need to know—we all deserve to know—what they mean by the words they use.

Seattle’s Income Tax on ‘the Rich’ Has Collateral Damage: The Poor

Once again, a “progressive” plan turns out, in practice, to operate more like the Sheriff of Nottingham than Robin Hood.

Feds turn flood insurance into a tool for land grabs in Oregon

When zoning and planning decisions are made for your community, which level of government should make the call?

Solution to rockweed harvesting should be rooted in privacy rights

The future of the abundant rockweed growing along Maine’s coast may turn on one of our country’s oldest ideas: property rights.

The Supreme Court should restore federalism to its rightful place. Utah’s prairie dogs depend on it.

This weekend, Senator Mike Lee of Utah and I had an article in the Wall Street Journal urging the Supreme Court to hear People for the Ethical Treatment of Property Owners v. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Why is Maryland imposing absurd regulations on entrepreneurs?

While most states are busy unleashing their entrepreneurs to create jobs and innovative services, Maryland is bucking the trend.

Federal court issues mixed decision on jaguar critical habitat challenge

In 2014, the federal government designated thousands of acres in New Mexico as “critical habitat” for the jaguar. The designation is absurd, because jaguars prefer the wet, tropical climates of Central and South America forests, to the dry, arid wilderness of the Southwest.

Yes, Trump can revoke national monuments

The Washington Post has published my op-ed defending the President’s power to revoke existing national monuments. Several months ago, President Trump ordered a review of the last 21 years of monument designations. For good reason, the evidence is indisputable that abuse of the monument power has been far worse the last few years.

The Morning Docket

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Yes, President Trump Can Replace Richard Cordray with an Acting Director

On Friday, Richard Cordray resigned as director of the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau. Today, two people are claiming to be the lawful acting director of the CFPB.

Endangered Species Act Bureaucrats Are Playing Word Games That Cost Billions Of Dollars

The government’s environmental scientists must start behaving more like real scientists and less like politicized bureaucrats. We all need to know—we all deserve to know—what they mean by the words they use.

Seattle’s Income Tax on ‘the Rich’ Has Collateral Damage: The Poor

Once again, a “progressive” plan turns out, in practice, to operate more like the Sheriff of Nottingham than Robin Hood.

Feds turn flood insurance into a tool for land grabs in Oregon

When zoning and planning decisions are made for your community, which level of government should make the call?

Solution to rockweed harvesting should be rooted in privacy rights

The future of the abundant rockweed growing along Maine’s coast may turn on one of our country’s oldest ideas: property rights.

The Supreme Court should restore federalism to its rightful place. Utah’s prairie dogs depend on it.

This weekend, Senator Mike Lee of Utah and I had an article in the Wall Street Journal urging the Supreme Court to hear People for the Ethical Treatment of Property Owners v. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Why is Maryland imposing absurd regulations on entrepreneurs?

While most states are busy unleashing their entrepreneurs to create jobs and innovative services, Maryland is bucking the trend.

Federal court issues mixed decision on jaguar critical habitat challenge

In 2014, the federal government designated thousands of acres in New Mexico as “critical habitat” for the jaguar. The designation is absurd, because jaguars prefer the wet, tropical climates of Central and South America forests, to the dry, arid wilderness of the Southwest.

Yes, Trump can revoke national monuments

The Washington Post has published my op-ed defending the President’s power to revoke existing national monuments. Several months ago, President Trump ordered a review of the last 21 years of monument designations. For good reason, the evidence is indisputable that abuse of the monument power has been far worse the last few years.

Yes, President Trump Can Replace Richard Cordray with an Acting Director

On Friday, Richard Cordray resigned as director of the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau. Today, two people are claiming to be the lawful acting director of the CFPB.

Endangered Species Act Bureaucrats Are Playing Word Games That Cost Billions Of Dollars

The government’s environmental scientists must start behaving more like real scientists and less like politicized bureaucrats. We all need to know—we all deserve to know—what they mean by the words they use.

Seattle’s Income Tax on ‘the Rich’ Has Collateral Damage: The Poor

Once again, a “progressive” plan turns out, in practice, to operate more like the Sheriff of Nottingham than Robin Hood.

Feds turn flood insurance into a tool for land grabs in Oregon

When zoning and planning decisions are made for your community, which level of government should make the call?

Solution to rockweed harvesting should be rooted in privacy rights

The future of the abundant rockweed growing along Maine’s coast may turn on one of our country’s oldest ideas: property rights.

The Supreme Court should restore federalism to its rightful place. Utah’s prairie dogs depend on it.

This weekend, Senator Mike Lee of Utah and I had an article in the Wall Street Journal urging the Supreme Court to hear People for the Ethical Treatment of Property Owners v. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Why is Maryland imposing absurd regulations on entrepreneurs?

While most states are busy unleashing their entrepreneurs to create jobs and innovative services, Maryland is bucking the trend.

Federal court issues mixed decision on jaguar critical habitat challenge

In 2014, the federal government designated thousands of acres in New Mexico as “critical habitat” for the jaguar. The designation is absurd, because jaguars prefer the wet, tropical climates of Central and South America forests, to the dry, arid wilderness of the Southwest.

Yes, Trump can revoke national monuments

The Washington Post has published my op-ed defending the President’s power to revoke existing national monuments. Several months ago, President Trump ordered a review of the last 21 years of monument designations. For good reason, the evidence is indisputable that abuse of the monument power has been far worse the last few years.