Yes, Trump can revoke national monuments

The Washington Post has published my op-ed defending the President’s power to revoke existing national monuments. Several months ago, President Trump ordered a review of the last 21 years of monument designations. For good reason, the evidence is indisputable that abuse of the monument power has been far worse the last few years.

Yes, Trump can revoke national monuments

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has finally completed a months-long review of dozens of controversial national monuments, recommending major changes to 10 monuments, including shrinking six and relaxing regulation of the other four.

Kill Regulations to Save the Sage Grouse

Conventional wisdom holds that state and federal environmental regulation is better than either alone. But even with the best of intentions, federal, one-size-fits-all regulation that interferes with more-effective state and private wildlife conservation efforts can cause real harm.

Celebrating Constitution Day with Alexander Hamilton

It’s not every year that Broadway’s Best Musical Tony Award goes to a show about a rapping Founding Father, but that’s just what happened with Lin-Manuel Miranda’s “Hamilton.” Not surprisingly, Alexander Hamilton—an original signer of the Constitution—recognized how important the Constitution would become for our success as a Republic. Today we celebrate the 230th anniversary of its signing. It remains as vital as ever.

Congress Takes Aim At Cronyism-By-Licensing

America was once called the land of opportunity — promising upward mobility and freedom for entrepreneurs to compete in the market. Does that remain true in an era when — … ›

In sports-betting case, the Supreme Court should bet on federalism

Can Congress dictate to states what their own laws must be? The Supreme Court agreed to decide that question in Christie v. National Collegiate Athletic Association, the latest iteration of New … ›

It’s magical legal thinking to say Trump can’t reverse Obama’s national monuments

Suppose President Trump declared much of California, Nevada and Oregon — states that just happened to vote against him — off-limits to economic development and recreational use. Suppose he barred all mining, … ›

Finally, a right to move—and to compete—in West Virginia

I’ve been a household goods mover for more than 24 years and, since 2005, owner of Lloyd’s Transfer & Storage, a small moving company in Berryville, Virginia, just 10 miles … ›

Things better than they appear this July 4

If you ask just about anybody — or scroll through Facebook or Twitter — it seems like our society is on the verge of collapse. We’re hopelessly divided and face … ›

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Yes, Trump can revoke national monuments

The Washington Post has published my op-ed defending the President’s power to revoke existing national monuments. Several months ago, President Trump ordered a review of the last 21 years of monument designations. For good reason, the evidence is indisputable that abuse of the monument power has been far worse the last few years.

Yes, Trump can revoke national monuments

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has finally completed a months-long review of dozens of controversial national monuments, recommending major changes to 10 monuments, including shrinking six and relaxing regulation of the other four.

Kill Regulations to Save the Sage Grouse

Conventional wisdom holds that state and federal environmental regulation is better than either alone. But even with the best of intentions, federal, one-size-fits-all regulation that interferes with more-effective state and private wildlife conservation efforts can cause real harm.

Celebrating Constitution Day with Alexander Hamilton

It’s not every year that Broadway’s Best Musical Tony Award goes to a show about a rapping Founding Father, but that’s just what happened with Lin-Manuel Miranda’s “Hamilton.” Not surprisingly, Alexander Hamilton—an original signer of the Constitution—recognized how important the Constitution would become for our success as a Republic. Today we celebrate the 230th anniversary of its signing. It remains as vital as ever.

Congress Takes Aim At Cronyism-By-Licensing

America was once called the land of opportunity — promising upward mobility and freedom for entrepreneurs to compete in the market. Does that remain true in an era when — … ›

In sports-betting case, the Supreme Court should bet on federalism

Can Congress dictate to states what their own laws must be? The Supreme Court agreed to decide that question in Christie v. National Collegiate Athletic Association, the latest iteration of New … ›

It’s magical legal thinking to say Trump can’t reverse Obama’s national monuments

Suppose President Trump declared much of California, Nevada and Oregon — states that just happened to vote against him — off-limits to economic development and recreational use. Suppose he barred all mining, … ›

Finally, a right to move—and to compete—in West Virginia

I’ve been a household goods mover for more than 24 years and, since 2005, owner of Lloyd’s Transfer & Storage, a small moving company in Berryville, Virginia, just 10 miles … ›

Things better than they appear this July 4

If you ask just about anybody — or scroll through Facebook or Twitter — it seems like our society is on the verge of collapse. We’re hopelessly divided and face … ›

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Yes, Trump can revoke national monuments

The Washington Post has published my op-ed defending the President’s power to revoke existing national monuments. Several months ago, President Trump ordered a review of the last 21 years of monument designations. For good reason, the evidence is indisputable that abuse of the monument power has been far worse the last few years.

Yes, Trump can revoke national monuments

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has finally completed a months-long review of dozens of controversial national monuments, recommending major changes to 10 monuments, including shrinking six and relaxing regulation of the other four.

Kill Regulations to Save the Sage Grouse

Conventional wisdom holds that state and federal environmental regulation is better than either alone. But even with the best of intentions, federal, one-size-fits-all regulation that interferes with more-effective state and private wildlife conservation efforts can cause real harm.

Celebrating Constitution Day with Alexander Hamilton

It’s not every year that Broadway’s Best Musical Tony Award goes to a show about a rapping Founding Father, but that’s just what happened with Lin-Manuel Miranda’s “Hamilton.” Not surprisingly, Alexander Hamilton—an original signer of the Constitution—recognized how important the Constitution would become for our success as a Republic. Today we celebrate the 230th anniversary of its signing. It remains as vital as ever.

Congress Takes Aim At Cronyism-By-Licensing

America was once called the land of opportunity — promising upward mobility and freedom for entrepreneurs to compete in the market. Does that remain true in an era when — … ›

In sports-betting case, the Supreme Court should bet on federalism

Can Congress dictate to states what their own laws must be? The Supreme Court agreed to decide that question in Christie v. National Collegiate Athletic Association, the latest iteration of New … ›

It’s magical legal thinking to say Trump can’t reverse Obama’s national monuments

Suppose President Trump declared much of California, Nevada and Oregon — states that just happened to vote against him — off-limits to economic development and recreational use. Suppose he barred all mining, … ›

Finally, a right to move—and to compete—in West Virginia

I’ve been a household goods mover for more than 24 years and, since 2005, owner of Lloyd’s Transfer & Storage, a small moving company in Berryville, Virginia, just 10 miles … ›

Things better than they appear this July 4

If you ask just about anybody — or scroll through Facebook or Twitter — it seems like our society is on the verge of collapse. We’re hopelessly divided and face … ›

Yes, Trump can revoke national monuments

The Washington Post has published my op-ed defending the President’s power to revoke existing national monuments. Several months ago, President Trump ordered a review of the last 21 years of monument designations. For good reason, the evidence is indisputable that abuse of the monument power has been far worse the last few years.

Yes, Trump can revoke national monuments

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has finally completed a months-long review of dozens of controversial national monuments, recommending major changes to 10 monuments, including shrinking six and relaxing regulation of the other four.

Kill Regulations to Save the Sage Grouse

Conventional wisdom holds that state and federal environmental regulation is better than either alone. But even with the best of intentions, federal, one-size-fits-all regulation that interferes with more-effective state and private wildlife conservation efforts can cause real harm.

Celebrating Constitution Day with Alexander Hamilton

It’s not every year that Broadway’s Best Musical Tony Award goes to a show about a rapping Founding Father, but that’s just what happened with Lin-Manuel Miranda’s “Hamilton.” Not surprisingly, Alexander Hamilton—an original signer of the Constitution—recognized how important the Constitution would become for our success as a Republic. Today we celebrate the 230th anniversary of its signing. It remains as vital as ever.

Congress Takes Aim At Cronyism-By-Licensing

America was once called the land of opportunity — promising upward mobility and freedom for entrepreneurs to compete in the market. Does that remain true in an era when — … ›

In sports-betting case, the Supreme Court should bet on federalism

Can Congress dictate to states what their own laws must be? The Supreme Court agreed to decide that question in Christie v. National Collegiate Athletic Association, the latest iteration of New … ›

It’s magical legal thinking to say Trump can’t reverse Obama’s national monuments

Suppose President Trump declared much of California, Nevada and Oregon — states that just happened to vote against him — off-limits to economic development and recreational use. Suppose he barred all mining, … ›

Finally, a right to move—and to compete—in West Virginia

I’ve been a household goods mover for more than 24 years and, since 2005, owner of Lloyd’s Transfer & Storage, a small moving company in Berryville, Virginia, just 10 miles … ›

Things better than they appear this July 4

If you ask just about anybody — or scroll through Facebook or Twitter — it seems like our society is on the verge of collapse. We’re hopelessly divided and face … ›