Documents

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers v. Hawkes Documents 5-31-16

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Case Attorneys

M. Reed Hopper

Senior Attorney

Reed Hopper was a Senior Attorney in PLF’s Environmental Law Practice Group. He oversaw the Foundation’s Endangered Species Act Program that is designed to ensure that species protections are balanced … ›

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Mark Miller

Senior Attorney

Mark Miller is a PLF Senior Attorney and manages PLF’s Florida office in Palm Beach Gardens. He has appeared on CBS This Morning and Fox Business News; both Fox & Friends and The … ›

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Podcast

PLF Unanimously Wins 8th Straight Supreme Court Decision

PLF won a precedent-setting victory for property owners’ rights when the US Supreme Court ruled in our favor in the PLF case of United States Corps of Engineers v Hawkes The groundbreaking decision accepted PLF’s arguments that landowners have a right to seek judicial review when their property is designated as wetlands subject to federal jurisdiction under the Clean Water Act

PLF Director of Communications Jim Burling hosts a round table discussion with PLF case attorneys Reed Hopper and Mark Miller, client Kevin Pierce, and Gray Plant Mooty Principal Attorney Nancy Burke discussing the implications of the case for property owners around the country

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Video

Hawkes U.S. Supreme Court Victory Reaction

PLF Director of Litigation Jim Burling provides instant reaction and analysis after PLF’s 8th straight US Supreme Court victory in US Army Corps of Engineers v Hawkes

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Post

By M. Reed Hopper

Landowners nationwide win their day in court!

For more than 40 years, millions of landowners nationwide have had no meaningful way to challenge wrongful application of the Clean Water Act to their land  That changed today when a unanimous US Supreme Court ruled landowners have the right to challenge federal claims of jurisdiction in a court of law

The Clean Water Act authorizes the Army Corps of Engineers and Environmental Protection Agency to regulate “navigable waters,” which these agencies interpret to mean virtually all waters in the United States and much of the land Such “waters” are subject to complete federal control They cannot be disturbed without a federal permit This puts landowners at the

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