Thomas Berry

Attorney

Sacramento

Thomas Berry is an attorney in PLF’s Sacramento office. Prior to joining PLF, Berry was a legal associate in the Cato Institute’s Center for Constitutional Studies. While at Cato, Berry co-authored a Supreme Court amicus brief that George Will described as “amusing.”

During law school, Berry interned at both Cato and Institute for Justice, a public-interest law firm in Arlington, Virginia. His opinion pieces have appeared in popular outlets including National Law Journal, National Review (Online), and The Hill (Online), and his academic articles have been published in Federalist Society Review, Cato Supreme Court Review, and NYU Journal of Law and Liberty.

Berry holds a J.D. from Stanford Law School, where he was a senior editor on the Stanford Law and Policy Review and a Bradley Student Fellow in the Stanford Constitutional Law Center. He graduated with a B.A. in Liberal Arts from St. John’s College, Santa Fe.

Thomas Berry is an attorney in PLF’s Sacramento office. Prior to joining PLF, Berry was a legal associate in the Cato Institute’s Center for Constitutional Studies. While at Cato, Berry co-authored a Supreme Court amicus brief that George Will described as “amusing.”

During law school, Berry interned at both Cato and Institute for Justice, a public-interest law firm in Arlington, Virginia. His opinion pieces have appeared in popular outlets including National Law Journal, National Review (Online), and The Hill (Online), and his academic articles have been published in Federalist Society Review, Cato Supreme Court Review, and NYU Journal of Law and Liberty.

Berry holds a J.D. from Stanford Law School, where he was a senior editor on the Stanford Law and Policy Review and a Bradley Student Fellow in the Stanford Constitutional Law Center. He graduated with a B.A. in Liberal Arts from St. John’s College, Santa Fe.

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Personal Liberties

Vaping Litigation

The Constitution going up in vapor

Electronic nicotine delivery systems—vaping devices and e-cigarettes—first hit U.S. stores in 2007. It didn’t take long for vaping to jump from zero to a $5 billion domestic industry, as entrepreneurs quickly recognized a market hungry for an alternative to traditional cigarettes. In 2016, just as the burgeoning vaping industry was getting off the ground, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) stepped in with a rule that deems e-cigarettes as tobacco products, and brand new, severe regulations that will only harm the industry and perhaps overall public health—contrary to the agency’s very mission. Using a unique legal theory, Pacific Legal Foundation is suing the FDA in three separate federal courtrooms—at the same time—on behalf of vape store owners and a harm reduction organization in several states who want to promote a more healthy alternative to smoking. The unconstitutional rule burdens these individuals and organizations in unique ways, but all are united in opposition to its continued enforcement. The FDA’s regulations are not only expensive and onerous, and prevent vaping entrepreneurs from fulfilling what they believe is a humanitarian mission of helping people, but the rule was illegal the second it hit the Federal Register.

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By Thomas Berry

Fighting for the Constitution and small business owners

PLF, representing several vape shop owners across the country, has filed complaints against the FDA in 3 separate federal courts.

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By Thomas Berry

Yes, President Trump Can Replace Richard Cordray with an Acting Director

On Friday, Richard Cordray resigned as director of the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau. Today, two people are claiming to be the lawful acting director of the CFPB.

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