Courts should look to voters’ intent when interpreting constitutional limitations on taxation

Yesterday, Pacific Legal Foundation, along with the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association and the Green Valley Hospital, filed an amicus brief in support of a group of Arizona legislators who are … ›

PLF petitions for rehearing in Utah prairie dog case

This morning, we filed a petition for rehearing en banc in People for the Ethical Treatment of Property Owners v. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—our challenge to the federal government’s constitutional … ›

Supreme Court calls for the Solicitor General's views on Rinehart v. California

This morning, the Supreme Court asked the United States’ Solicitor General to weigh in on Rinehart v. California, PLF’s challenge to California’s suction dredge mining ban. The case raises significant … ›

Federalism depends on courts stopping states from regulating beyond their borders

Today, PLF filed an amicus brief in the Second Circuit supporting a television manufacturer’s challenge to a Connecticut law that shifts the cost of a local recycling program onto consumers in other states. The law is plainly unconstitutional under the Dormant Commerce Clause, which forbids states from regulating or taxing activity beyond their borders.

This has been a growing problem in recent years, as more states have attempted to impose their environmental regulations beyond their borders. In our brief, we explain that this trend of states encroaching on their neighbors undermines the Constitution’s system of competitive federalism.

President Trump orders review of 21 years of Antiquities Act abuse

This morning, President Trump issued an executive order requiring the Department of Interior to review 21 years of national monument designations. That review is long overdue. For decades, Presidents have … ›

State legislatures do not define what constitutes “just compensation”

The Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution provides that private property shall not be taken “for public use, without just compensation.” The just compensation requirement safeguards private property rights by … ›

Seattle Robs Landlords of Right to Choose Tenants on Courting Liberty podcast

In this week’s episode of Courting Liberty, PLF’s Director of Communications Harold Johnson interviews PLF Northwest Center Attorney Ethan Blevins and PLF Client MariLyn Yim about the challenging of Seattle’s … ›

Property forum in Acton, CA exposes rural concerns over SB 1263

Last Thursday night, Damien Schiff and I had the opportunity to speak before 150 or so gathered residents of Acton, Agua Dulce, and a few other nearby unincorporated communities of … ›

New Jersey places a bet on the Constitution

States are not puppets of the federal government, to be manipulated to accomplish whatever policy the federal government might prefer. If they were, both individual liberty and political accountability would … ›

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Courts should look to voters’ intent when interpreting constitutional limitations on taxation

Yesterday, Pacific Legal Foundation, along with the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association and the Green Valley Hospital, filed an amicus brief in support of a group of Arizona legislators who are … ›

PLF petitions for rehearing in Utah prairie dog case

This morning, we filed a petition for rehearing en banc in People for the Ethical Treatment of Property Owners v. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—our challenge to the federal government’s constitutional … ›

Supreme Court calls for the Solicitor General's views on Rinehart v. California

This morning, the Supreme Court asked the United States’ Solicitor General to weigh in on Rinehart v. California, PLF’s challenge to California’s suction dredge mining ban. The case raises significant … ›

Federalism depends on courts stopping states from regulating beyond their borders

Today, PLF filed an amicus brief in the Second Circuit supporting a television manufacturer’s challenge to a Connecticut law that shifts the cost of a local recycling program onto consumers in other states. The law is plainly unconstitutional under the Dormant Commerce Clause, which forbids states from regulating or taxing activity beyond their borders.

This has been a growing problem in recent years, as more states have attempted to impose their environmental regulations beyond their borders. In our brief, we explain that this trend of states encroaching on their neighbors undermines the Constitution’s system of competitive federalism.

President Trump orders review of 21 years of Antiquities Act abuse

This morning, President Trump issued an executive order requiring the Department of Interior to review 21 years of national monument designations. That review is long overdue. For decades, Presidents have … ›

State legislatures do not define what constitutes “just compensation”

The Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution provides that private property shall not be taken “for public use, without just compensation.” The just compensation requirement safeguards private property rights by … ›

Seattle Robs Landlords of Right to Choose Tenants on Courting Liberty podcast

In this week’s episode of Courting Liberty, PLF’s Director of Communications Harold Johnson interviews PLF Northwest Center Attorney Ethan Blevins and PLF Client MariLyn Yim about the challenging of Seattle’s … ›

Property forum in Acton, CA exposes rural concerns over SB 1263

Last Thursday night, Damien Schiff and I had the opportunity to speak before 150 or so gathered residents of Acton, Agua Dulce, and a few other nearby unincorporated communities of … ›

New Jersey places a bet on the Constitution

States are not puppets of the federal government, to be manipulated to accomplish whatever policy the federal government might prefer. If they were, both individual liberty and political accountability would … ›

The Morning Docket

Stay up to date with the Morning Docket, a weekly highlight of PLF's best articles, videos, and podcasts.

Courts should look to voters’ intent when interpreting constitutional limitations on taxation

Yesterday, Pacific Legal Foundation, along with the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association and the Green Valley Hospital, filed an amicus brief in support of a group of Arizona legislators who are … ›

PLF petitions for rehearing in Utah prairie dog case

This morning, we filed a petition for rehearing en banc in People for the Ethical Treatment of Property Owners v. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—our challenge to the federal government’s constitutional … ›

Supreme Court calls for the Solicitor General's views on Rinehart v. California

This morning, the Supreme Court asked the United States’ Solicitor General to weigh in on Rinehart v. California, PLF’s challenge to California’s suction dredge mining ban. The case raises significant … ›

Federalism depends on courts stopping states from regulating beyond their borders

Today, PLF filed an amicus brief in the Second Circuit supporting a television manufacturer’s challenge to a Connecticut law that shifts the cost of a local recycling program onto consumers in other states. The law is plainly unconstitutional under the Dormant Commerce Clause, which forbids states from regulating or taxing activity beyond their borders.

This has been a growing problem in recent years, as more states have attempted to impose their environmental regulations beyond their borders. In our brief, we explain that this trend of states encroaching on their neighbors undermines the Constitution’s system of competitive federalism.

President Trump orders review of 21 years of Antiquities Act abuse

This morning, President Trump issued an executive order requiring the Department of Interior to review 21 years of national monument designations. That review is long overdue. For decades, Presidents have … ›

State legislatures do not define what constitutes “just compensation”

The Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution provides that private property shall not be taken “for public use, without just compensation.” The just compensation requirement safeguards private property rights by … ›

Seattle Robs Landlords of Right to Choose Tenants on Courting Liberty podcast

In this week’s episode of Courting Liberty, PLF’s Director of Communications Harold Johnson interviews PLF Northwest Center Attorney Ethan Blevins and PLF Client MariLyn Yim about the challenging of Seattle’s … ›

Property forum in Acton, CA exposes rural concerns over SB 1263

Last Thursday night, Damien Schiff and I had the opportunity to speak before 150 or so gathered residents of Acton, Agua Dulce, and a few other nearby unincorporated communities of … ›

New Jersey places a bet on the Constitution

States are not puppets of the federal government, to be manipulated to accomplish whatever policy the federal government might prefer. If they were, both individual liberty and political accountability would … ›

Courts should look to voters’ intent when interpreting constitutional limitations on taxation

Yesterday, Pacific Legal Foundation, along with the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association and the Green Valley Hospital, filed an amicus brief in support of a group of Arizona legislators who are … ›

PLF petitions for rehearing in Utah prairie dog case

This morning, we filed a petition for rehearing en banc in People for the Ethical Treatment of Property Owners v. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—our challenge to the federal government’s constitutional … ›

Supreme Court calls for the Solicitor General's views on Rinehart v. California

This morning, the Supreme Court asked the United States’ Solicitor General to weigh in on Rinehart v. California, PLF’s challenge to California’s suction dredge mining ban. The case raises significant … ›

Federalism depends on courts stopping states from regulating beyond their borders

Today, PLF filed an amicus brief in the Second Circuit supporting a television manufacturer’s challenge to a Connecticut law that shifts the cost of a local recycling program onto consumers in other states. The law is plainly unconstitutional under the Dormant Commerce Clause, which forbids states from regulating or taxing activity beyond their borders.

This has been a growing problem in recent years, as more states have attempted to impose their environmental regulations beyond their borders. In our brief, we explain that this trend of states encroaching on their neighbors undermines the Constitution’s system of competitive federalism.

President Trump orders review of 21 years of Antiquities Act abuse

This morning, President Trump issued an executive order requiring the Department of Interior to review 21 years of national monument designations. That review is long overdue. For decades, Presidents have … ›

State legislatures do not define what constitutes “just compensation”

The Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution provides that private property shall not be taken “for public use, without just compensation.” The just compensation requirement safeguards private property rights by … ›

Seattle Robs Landlords of Right to Choose Tenants on Courting Liberty podcast

In this week’s episode of Courting Liberty, PLF’s Director of Communications Harold Johnson interviews PLF Northwest Center Attorney Ethan Blevins and PLF Client MariLyn Yim about the challenging of Seattle’s … ›

Property forum in Acton, CA exposes rural concerns over SB 1263

Last Thursday night, Damien Schiff and I had the opportunity to speak before 150 or so gathered residents of Acton, Agua Dulce, and a few other nearby unincorporated communities of … ›

New Jersey places a bet on the Constitution

States are not puppets of the federal government, to be manipulated to accomplish whatever policy the federal government might prefer. If they were, both individual liberty and political accountability would … ›