PLF asks the U.S. Supreme Court to revisit Penn Central

Forty years ago, in Penn Central Transp.  Co. v. City of New York (1978), the U.S. Supreme Court explained that regulatory takings cases are “essentially ad hoc, factual inquiries” wherein … ›

A postscript to the Utah prairie dog case: federal agency embraces state-led reform

For decades, a federal agency had forbidden people in southwestern Utah from doing things that most of us take for granted in our own communities, like building homes, starting businesses, … ›

One unelected bureaucrat should not have unilateral authority over the use of 640 million acres of public land

Today, PLF filed a brief on behalf of Gregory Yount, a self-employed prospector and miner, that asks the Supreme Court to hear two cases involving the use of federal public … ›

Ninth Circuit: Unelected bureaucrats can do whatever they want, no matter what the law or facts say. See Chevron.

In the 80s, Congress enacted a statute authorizing the Service to move otters to southern California on the condition that it implement protections for the surrounding fishery and the fishermen … ›

PLF files renewed motion to dismiss in lawsuit that challenges use of the Congressional Review Act

Today, PLF filed a renewed motion to dismiss in Center for Biological Diversity v. Zinke, a case that challenges Congress’ use of the Congressional Review Act to overturn a Department … ›

Courts should look to voters’ intent when interpreting constitutional limitations on taxation

Yesterday, Pacific Legal Foundation, along with the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association and the Green Valley Hospital, filed an amicus brief in support of a group of Arizona legislators who are … ›

PLF petitions for rehearing in Utah prairie dog case

This morning, we filed a petition for rehearing en banc in People for the Ethical Treatment of Property Owners v. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—our challenge to the federal government’s constitutional … ›

Supreme Court calls for the Solicitor General's views on Rinehart v. California

This morning, the Supreme Court asked the United States’ Solicitor General to weigh in on Rinehart v. California, PLF’s challenge to California’s suction dredge mining ban. The case raises significant … ›

Federalism depends on courts stopping states from regulating beyond their borders

Today, PLF filed an amicus brief in the Second Circuit supporting a television manufacturer’s challenge to a Connecticut law that shifts the cost of a local recycling program onto consumers in other states. The law is plainly unconstitutional under the Dormant Commerce Clause, which forbids states from regulating or taxing activity beyond their borders.

This has been a growing problem in recent years, as more states have attempted to impose their environmental regulations beyond their borders. In our brief, we explain that this trend of states encroaching on their neighbors undermines the Constitution’s system of competitive federalism.

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PLF asks the U.S. Supreme Court to revisit Penn Central

Forty years ago, in Penn Central Transp.  Co. v. City of New York (1978), the U.S. Supreme Court explained that regulatory takings cases are “essentially ad hoc, factual inquiries” wherein … ›

A postscript to the Utah prairie dog case: federal agency embraces state-led reform

For decades, a federal agency had forbidden people in southwestern Utah from doing things that most of us take for granted in our own communities, like building homes, starting businesses, … ›

One unelected bureaucrat should not have unilateral authority over the use of 640 million acres of public land

Today, PLF filed a brief on behalf of Gregory Yount, a self-employed prospector and miner, that asks the Supreme Court to hear two cases involving the use of federal public … ›

Ninth Circuit: Unelected bureaucrats can do whatever they want, no matter what the law or facts say. See Chevron.

In the 80s, Congress enacted a statute authorizing the Service to move otters to southern California on the condition that it implement protections for the surrounding fishery and the fishermen … ›

PLF files renewed motion to dismiss in lawsuit that challenges use of the Congressional Review Act

Today, PLF filed a renewed motion to dismiss in Center for Biological Diversity v. Zinke, a case that challenges Congress’ use of the Congressional Review Act to overturn a Department … ›

Courts should look to voters’ intent when interpreting constitutional limitations on taxation

Yesterday, Pacific Legal Foundation, along with the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association and the Green Valley Hospital, filed an amicus brief in support of a group of Arizona legislators who are … ›

PLF petitions for rehearing in Utah prairie dog case

This morning, we filed a petition for rehearing en banc in People for the Ethical Treatment of Property Owners v. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—our challenge to the federal government’s constitutional … ›

Supreme Court calls for the Solicitor General's views on Rinehart v. California

This morning, the Supreme Court asked the United States’ Solicitor General to weigh in on Rinehart v. California, PLF’s challenge to California’s suction dredge mining ban. The case raises significant … ›

Federalism depends on courts stopping states from regulating beyond their borders

Today, PLF filed an amicus brief in the Second Circuit supporting a television manufacturer’s challenge to a Connecticut law that shifts the cost of a local recycling program onto consumers in other states. The law is plainly unconstitutional under the Dormant Commerce Clause, which forbids states from regulating or taxing activity beyond their borders.

This has been a growing problem in recent years, as more states have attempted to impose their environmental regulations beyond their borders. In our brief, we explain that this trend of states encroaching on their neighbors undermines the Constitution’s system of competitive federalism.

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PLF asks the U.S. Supreme Court to revisit Penn Central

Forty years ago, in Penn Central Transp.  Co. v. City of New York (1978), the U.S. Supreme Court explained that regulatory takings cases are “essentially ad hoc, factual inquiries” wherein … ›

A postscript to the Utah prairie dog case: federal agency embraces state-led reform

For decades, a federal agency had forbidden people in southwestern Utah from doing things that most of us take for granted in our own communities, like building homes, starting businesses, … ›

One unelected bureaucrat should not have unilateral authority over the use of 640 million acres of public land

Today, PLF filed a brief on behalf of Gregory Yount, a self-employed prospector and miner, that asks the Supreme Court to hear two cases involving the use of federal public … ›

Ninth Circuit: Unelected bureaucrats can do whatever they want, no matter what the law or facts say. See Chevron.

In the 80s, Congress enacted a statute authorizing the Service to move otters to southern California on the condition that it implement protections for the surrounding fishery and the fishermen … ›

PLF files renewed motion to dismiss in lawsuit that challenges use of the Congressional Review Act

Today, PLF filed a renewed motion to dismiss in Center for Biological Diversity v. Zinke, a case that challenges Congress’ use of the Congressional Review Act to overturn a Department … ›

Courts should look to voters’ intent when interpreting constitutional limitations on taxation

Yesterday, Pacific Legal Foundation, along with the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association and the Green Valley Hospital, filed an amicus brief in support of a group of Arizona legislators who are … ›

PLF petitions for rehearing in Utah prairie dog case

This morning, we filed a petition for rehearing en banc in People for the Ethical Treatment of Property Owners v. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—our challenge to the federal government’s constitutional … ›

Supreme Court calls for the Solicitor General's views on Rinehart v. California

This morning, the Supreme Court asked the United States’ Solicitor General to weigh in on Rinehart v. California, PLF’s challenge to California’s suction dredge mining ban. The case raises significant … ›

Federalism depends on courts stopping states from regulating beyond their borders

Today, PLF filed an amicus brief in the Second Circuit supporting a television manufacturer’s challenge to a Connecticut law that shifts the cost of a local recycling program onto consumers in other states. The law is plainly unconstitutional under the Dormant Commerce Clause, which forbids states from regulating or taxing activity beyond their borders.

This has been a growing problem in recent years, as more states have attempted to impose their environmental regulations beyond their borders. In our brief, we explain that this trend of states encroaching on their neighbors undermines the Constitution’s system of competitive federalism.

PLF asks the U.S. Supreme Court to revisit Penn Central

Forty years ago, in Penn Central Transp.  Co. v. City of New York (1978), the U.S. Supreme Court explained that regulatory takings cases are “essentially ad hoc, factual inquiries” wherein … ›

A postscript to the Utah prairie dog case: federal agency embraces state-led reform

For decades, a federal agency had forbidden people in southwestern Utah from doing things that most of us take for granted in our own communities, like building homes, starting businesses, … ›

One unelected bureaucrat should not have unilateral authority over the use of 640 million acres of public land

Today, PLF filed a brief on behalf of Gregory Yount, a self-employed prospector and miner, that asks the Supreme Court to hear two cases involving the use of federal public … ›

Ninth Circuit: Unelected bureaucrats can do whatever they want, no matter what the law or facts say. See Chevron.

In the 80s, Congress enacted a statute authorizing the Service to move otters to southern California on the condition that it implement protections for the surrounding fishery and the fishermen … ›

PLF files renewed motion to dismiss in lawsuit that challenges use of the Congressional Review Act

Today, PLF filed a renewed motion to dismiss in Center for Biological Diversity v. Zinke, a case that challenges Congress’ use of the Congressional Review Act to overturn a Department … ›

Courts should look to voters’ intent when interpreting constitutional limitations on taxation

Yesterday, Pacific Legal Foundation, along with the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association and the Green Valley Hospital, filed an amicus brief in support of a group of Arizona legislators who are … ›

PLF petitions for rehearing in Utah prairie dog case

This morning, we filed a petition for rehearing en banc in People for the Ethical Treatment of Property Owners v. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—our challenge to the federal government’s constitutional … ›

Supreme Court calls for the Solicitor General's views on Rinehart v. California

This morning, the Supreme Court asked the United States’ Solicitor General to weigh in on Rinehart v. California, PLF’s challenge to California’s suction dredge mining ban. The case raises significant … ›

Federalism depends on courts stopping states from regulating beyond their borders

Today, PLF filed an amicus brief in the Second Circuit supporting a television manufacturer’s challenge to a Connecticut law that shifts the cost of a local recycling program onto consumers in other states. The law is plainly unconstitutional under the Dormant Commerce Clause, which forbids states from regulating or taxing activity beyond their borders.

This has been a growing problem in recent years, as more states have attempted to impose their environmental regulations beyond their borders. In our brief, we explain that this trend of states encroaching on their neighbors undermines the Constitution’s system of competitive federalism.