Southwest ranchers are fighting back against federal bureaucrats’ abusive word games

Making a living ranching or farming in the harsh desert lands of American southwest is demanding enough. But federal bureaucrats have managed to make it even harder by playing word … ›

It’s time to restrain federal agencies’ power grabs

PLF filed a fresh lawsuit today on the heels of our latest Supreme Court victory. Last week, in Weyerhaeuser v. United States Fish and Wildlife Service, a unanimous Supreme Court … ›

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Should Follow the Law

The Service claims it is exempt from Regulatory Flexibility Act requirements because critical habitat designations impact only other federal agencies. But this claim is in error. While critical habitat designations do require federal agencies to manage critical habitat, the restrictions of the designations also directly affect small businesses, making designations subject to RFA requirements.

Weekly litigation report — August 18, 2018

Opening day for SCOTUS nears as PLF readies to throw first pitch This week Pacific Legal Foundation filed its Reply Brief in Weyerhaeuser v. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, a … ›

Weekly litigation update — April 28, 2018

Markle Interests’ brief filed with High Court in Weyerhaeuser v. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service This week we filed our merits brief in the Supreme Court supporting the landowers in … ›

Weekly litigation update — March 24, 2018

PLF demands that government consider the costs of its regulations According to the Regulatory Flexibility Act, a government agency that issues a regulation must prepare a report that describes the … ›

Weekly litigation report—December 16, 2017

PLF supports property owners’ right to a jury in federal takings cases, Code violations should not be a city’s no-appeal cash machine, and Courts should rule in the best interests of Indian children—just like other children are treated.

PLF announces appeal to illegal jaguar rule

The designation of critical habitat for jaguar in New Mexico unnecessarily ties thousands of acres of land in red tape. The rule makes it harder for ranchers to get grazing permits, build corrals, stock ponds, or additional fences.

PLF, Ranchers tell federal agencies they cannot ignore economic costs of their decisions

Before making a decision, most organizations take into account the costs and benefits of a proposed action, and will change course if the costs outweigh the benefits. Unfortunately, the federal government takes a different approach…

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Southwest ranchers are fighting back against federal bureaucrats’ abusive word games

Making a living ranching or farming in the harsh desert lands of American southwest is demanding enough. But federal bureaucrats have managed to make it even harder by playing word … ›

It’s time to restrain federal agencies’ power grabs

PLF filed a fresh lawsuit today on the heels of our latest Supreme Court victory. Last week, in Weyerhaeuser v. United States Fish and Wildlife Service, a unanimous Supreme Court … ›

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Should Follow the Law

The Service claims it is exempt from Regulatory Flexibility Act requirements because critical habitat designations impact only other federal agencies. But this claim is in error. While critical habitat designations do require federal agencies to manage critical habitat, the restrictions of the designations also directly affect small businesses, making designations subject to RFA requirements.

Weekly litigation report — August 18, 2018

Opening day for SCOTUS nears as PLF readies to throw first pitch This week Pacific Legal Foundation filed its Reply Brief in Weyerhaeuser v. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, a … ›

Weekly litigation update — April 28, 2018

Markle Interests’ brief filed with High Court in Weyerhaeuser v. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service This week we filed our merits brief in the Supreme Court supporting the landowers in … ›

Weekly litigation update — March 24, 2018

PLF demands that government consider the costs of its regulations According to the Regulatory Flexibility Act, a government agency that issues a regulation must prepare a report that describes the … ›

Weekly litigation report—December 16, 2017

PLF supports property owners’ right to a jury in federal takings cases, Code violations should not be a city’s no-appeal cash machine, and Courts should rule in the best interests of Indian children—just like other children are treated.

PLF announces appeal to illegal jaguar rule

The designation of critical habitat for jaguar in New Mexico unnecessarily ties thousands of acres of land in red tape. The rule makes it harder for ranchers to get grazing permits, build corrals, stock ponds, or additional fences.

PLF, Ranchers tell federal agencies they cannot ignore economic costs of their decisions

Before making a decision, most organizations take into account the costs and benefits of a proposed action, and will change course if the costs outweigh the benefits. Unfortunately, the federal government takes a different approach…

The Morning Docket

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Southwest ranchers are fighting back against federal bureaucrats’ abusive word games

Making a living ranching or farming in the harsh desert lands of American southwest is demanding enough. But federal bureaucrats have managed to make it even harder by playing word … ›

It’s time to restrain federal agencies’ power grabs

PLF filed a fresh lawsuit today on the heels of our latest Supreme Court victory. Last week, in Weyerhaeuser v. United States Fish and Wildlife Service, a unanimous Supreme Court … ›

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Should Follow the Law

The Service claims it is exempt from Regulatory Flexibility Act requirements because critical habitat designations impact only other federal agencies. But this claim is in error. While critical habitat designations do require federal agencies to manage critical habitat, the restrictions of the designations also directly affect small businesses, making designations subject to RFA requirements.

Weekly litigation report — August 18, 2018

Opening day for SCOTUS nears as PLF readies to throw first pitch This week Pacific Legal Foundation filed its Reply Brief in Weyerhaeuser v. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, a … ›

Weekly litigation update — April 28, 2018

Markle Interests’ brief filed with High Court in Weyerhaeuser v. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service This week we filed our merits brief in the Supreme Court supporting the landowers in … ›

Weekly litigation update — March 24, 2018

PLF demands that government consider the costs of its regulations According to the Regulatory Flexibility Act, a government agency that issues a regulation must prepare a report that describes the … ›

Weekly litigation report—December 16, 2017

PLF supports property owners’ right to a jury in federal takings cases, Code violations should not be a city’s no-appeal cash machine, and Courts should rule in the best interests of Indian children—just like other children are treated.

PLF announces appeal to illegal jaguar rule

The designation of critical habitat for jaguar in New Mexico unnecessarily ties thousands of acres of land in red tape. The rule makes it harder for ranchers to get grazing permits, build corrals, stock ponds, or additional fences.

PLF, Ranchers tell federal agencies they cannot ignore economic costs of their decisions

Before making a decision, most organizations take into account the costs and benefits of a proposed action, and will change course if the costs outweigh the benefits. Unfortunately, the federal government takes a different approach…

Southwest ranchers are fighting back against federal bureaucrats’ abusive word games

Making a living ranching or farming in the harsh desert lands of American southwest is demanding enough. But federal bureaucrats have managed to make it even harder by playing word … ›

It’s time to restrain federal agencies’ power grabs

PLF filed a fresh lawsuit today on the heels of our latest Supreme Court victory. Last week, in Weyerhaeuser v. United States Fish and Wildlife Service, a unanimous Supreme Court … ›

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Should Follow the Law

The Service claims it is exempt from Regulatory Flexibility Act requirements because critical habitat designations impact only other federal agencies. But this claim is in error. While critical habitat designations do require federal agencies to manage critical habitat, the restrictions of the designations also directly affect small businesses, making designations subject to RFA requirements.

Weekly litigation report — August 18, 2018

Opening day for SCOTUS nears as PLF readies to throw first pitch This week Pacific Legal Foundation filed its Reply Brief in Weyerhaeuser v. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, a … ›

Weekly litigation update — April 28, 2018

Markle Interests’ brief filed with High Court in Weyerhaeuser v. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service This week we filed our merits brief in the Supreme Court supporting the landowers in … ›

Weekly litigation update — March 24, 2018

PLF demands that government consider the costs of its regulations According to the Regulatory Flexibility Act, a government agency that issues a regulation must prepare a report that describes the … ›

Weekly litigation report—December 16, 2017

PLF supports property owners’ right to a jury in federal takings cases, Code violations should not be a city’s no-appeal cash machine, and Courts should rule in the best interests of Indian children—just like other children are treated.

PLF announces appeal to illegal jaguar rule

The designation of critical habitat for jaguar in New Mexico unnecessarily ties thousands of acres of land in red tape. The rule makes it harder for ranchers to get grazing permits, build corrals, stock ponds, or additional fences.

PLF, Ranchers tell federal agencies they cannot ignore economic costs of their decisions

Before making a decision, most organizations take into account the costs and benefits of a proposed action, and will change course if the costs outweigh the benefits. Unfortunately, the federal government takes a different approach…