California agency refuses to comply with California Endangered Species Act

You’d think that California would want to comply with laws that protect the environment. But that’s not always the case. The California Endangered Species Act (CESA) requires the California Department … ›

Property rights are key to protecting Maine’s rockweed ecosystem

the Maine Supreme Judicial Court will hear oral argument in a case that, befitting the season, is a cornucopia of PLF issues.

Federalism depends on courts stopping states from regulating beyond their borders

Today, PLF filed an amicus brief in the Second Circuit supporting a television manufacturer’s challenge to a Connecticut law that shifts the cost of a local recycling program onto consumers in other states. The law is plainly unconstitutional under the Dormant Commerce Clause, which forbids states from regulating or taxing activity beyond their borders.

This has been a growing problem in recent years, as more states have attempted to impose their environmental regulations beyond their borders. In our brief, we explain that this trend of states encroaching on their neighbors undermines the Constitution’s system of competitive federalism.

Environmental extremists dismiss property rights

Over on the Huffington Post, Noah Greenwald of the Center for Biological Diversity launches an over-the-top broadside against several people involved in the incoming President’s administration. The part that is … ›

Plan Bay Area argument set for May 31

Next Tuesday, May 31, the California Court of Appeal will hear argument over the legality of Plan Bay Area — the plan to restrict future development in all but a … ›

The Center for Biological Diversity goes batty

The Center for Biological Diversity is threatening to sue the Fish & Wildlife Service for not imposing ruinous and unnecessary restrictions on private property owners throughout 37 states to protect … ›

Are states better than the feds at protecting endangered species?

In honor of Groundhog Day, WildEarth Guardians released its annual report card for federal and state management of prairie dogs. Unsurprisingly, the environmental group isn’t too fond of PLF’s victory … ›

Is environmental law an ass?

No, according to a decision from the Second Circuit issued this week. In Friends of Animals v. Clay, a radical animal rights group challenged a federal permit to take migratory … ›

Has the pit bull of environmental law been spayed?

The Endangered Species Act has often been called the “pit bull of environmental law” because “[i]t’s short, compact and has a hell of a set of teeth. Because of its … ›

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California agency refuses to comply with California Endangered Species Act

You’d think that California would want to comply with laws that protect the environment. But that’s not always the case. The California Endangered Species Act (CESA) requires the California Department … ›

Property rights are key to protecting Maine’s rockweed ecosystem

the Maine Supreme Judicial Court will hear oral argument in a case that, befitting the season, is a cornucopia of PLF issues.

Federalism depends on courts stopping states from regulating beyond their borders

Today, PLF filed an amicus brief in the Second Circuit supporting a television manufacturer’s challenge to a Connecticut law that shifts the cost of a local recycling program onto consumers in other states. The law is plainly unconstitutional under the Dormant Commerce Clause, which forbids states from regulating or taxing activity beyond their borders.

This has been a growing problem in recent years, as more states have attempted to impose their environmental regulations beyond their borders. In our brief, we explain that this trend of states encroaching on their neighbors undermines the Constitution’s system of competitive federalism.

Environmental extremists dismiss property rights

Over on the Huffington Post, Noah Greenwald of the Center for Biological Diversity launches an over-the-top broadside against several people involved in the incoming President’s administration. The part that is … ›

Plan Bay Area argument set for May 31

Next Tuesday, May 31, the California Court of Appeal will hear argument over the legality of Plan Bay Area — the plan to restrict future development in all but a … ›

The Center for Biological Diversity goes batty

The Center for Biological Diversity is threatening to sue the Fish & Wildlife Service for not imposing ruinous and unnecessary restrictions on private property owners throughout 37 states to protect … ›

Are states better than the feds at protecting endangered species?

In honor of Groundhog Day, WildEarth Guardians released its annual report card for federal and state management of prairie dogs. Unsurprisingly, the environmental group isn’t too fond of PLF’s victory … ›

Is environmental law an ass?

No, according to a decision from the Second Circuit issued this week. In Friends of Animals v. Clay, a radical animal rights group challenged a federal permit to take migratory … ›

Has the pit bull of environmental law been spayed?

The Endangered Species Act has often been called the “pit bull of environmental law” because “[i]t’s short, compact and has a hell of a set of teeth. Because of its … ›

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Stay up to date with the Morning Docket, a weekly highlight of PLF's best articles, videos, and podcasts.

California agency refuses to comply with California Endangered Species Act

You’d think that California would want to comply with laws that protect the environment. But that’s not always the case. The California Endangered Species Act (CESA) requires the California Department … ›

Property rights are key to protecting Maine’s rockweed ecosystem

the Maine Supreme Judicial Court will hear oral argument in a case that, befitting the season, is a cornucopia of PLF issues.

Federalism depends on courts stopping states from regulating beyond their borders

Today, PLF filed an amicus brief in the Second Circuit supporting a television manufacturer’s challenge to a Connecticut law that shifts the cost of a local recycling program onto consumers in other states. The law is plainly unconstitutional under the Dormant Commerce Clause, which forbids states from regulating or taxing activity beyond their borders.

This has been a growing problem in recent years, as more states have attempted to impose their environmental regulations beyond their borders. In our brief, we explain that this trend of states encroaching on their neighbors undermines the Constitution’s system of competitive federalism.

Environmental extremists dismiss property rights

Over on the Huffington Post, Noah Greenwald of the Center for Biological Diversity launches an over-the-top broadside against several people involved in the incoming President’s administration. The part that is … ›

Plan Bay Area argument set for May 31

Next Tuesday, May 31, the California Court of Appeal will hear argument over the legality of Plan Bay Area — the plan to restrict future development in all but a … ›

The Center for Biological Diversity goes batty

The Center for Biological Diversity is threatening to sue the Fish & Wildlife Service for not imposing ruinous and unnecessary restrictions on private property owners throughout 37 states to protect … ›

Are states better than the feds at protecting endangered species?

In honor of Groundhog Day, WildEarth Guardians released its annual report card for federal and state management of prairie dogs. Unsurprisingly, the environmental group isn’t too fond of PLF’s victory … ›

Is environmental law an ass?

No, according to a decision from the Second Circuit issued this week. In Friends of Animals v. Clay, a radical animal rights group challenged a federal permit to take migratory … ›

Has the pit bull of environmental law been spayed?

The Endangered Species Act has often been called the “pit bull of environmental law” because “[i]t’s short, compact and has a hell of a set of teeth. Because of its … ›

California agency refuses to comply with California Endangered Species Act

You’d think that California would want to comply with laws that protect the environment. But that’s not always the case. The California Endangered Species Act (CESA) requires the California Department … ›

Property rights are key to protecting Maine’s rockweed ecosystem

the Maine Supreme Judicial Court will hear oral argument in a case that, befitting the season, is a cornucopia of PLF issues.

Federalism depends on courts stopping states from regulating beyond their borders

Today, PLF filed an amicus brief in the Second Circuit supporting a television manufacturer’s challenge to a Connecticut law that shifts the cost of a local recycling program onto consumers in other states. The law is plainly unconstitutional under the Dormant Commerce Clause, which forbids states from regulating or taxing activity beyond their borders.

This has been a growing problem in recent years, as more states have attempted to impose their environmental regulations beyond their borders. In our brief, we explain that this trend of states encroaching on their neighbors undermines the Constitution’s system of competitive federalism.

Environmental extremists dismiss property rights

Over on the Huffington Post, Noah Greenwald of the Center for Biological Diversity launches an over-the-top broadside against several people involved in the incoming President’s administration. The part that is … ›

Plan Bay Area argument set for May 31

Next Tuesday, May 31, the California Court of Appeal will hear argument over the legality of Plan Bay Area — the plan to restrict future development in all but a … ›

The Center for Biological Diversity goes batty

The Center for Biological Diversity is threatening to sue the Fish & Wildlife Service for not imposing ruinous and unnecessary restrictions on private property owners throughout 37 states to protect … ›

Are states better than the feds at protecting endangered species?

In honor of Groundhog Day, WildEarth Guardians released its annual report card for federal and state management of prairie dogs. Unsurprisingly, the environmental group isn’t too fond of PLF’s victory … ›

Is environmental law an ass?

No, according to a decision from the Second Circuit issued this week. In Friends of Animals v. Clay, a radical animal rights group challenged a federal permit to take migratory … ›

Has the pit bull of environmental law been spayed?

The Endangered Species Act has often been called the “pit bull of environmental law” because “[i]t’s short, compact and has a hell of a set of teeth. Because of its … ›