If courts are ever going to strike down an illegal national monument, this’ll be it

Often, it seems the federal government has it out for the English language. The President and federal agencies routinely twist the words in statutes beyond recognition. For instance, PLF has … ›

In Northeast Canyons monument case, will President Trump follow the Secretary of Interior’s recommendation to lift illegal fishing prohibitions or will he defend his predecessor’s Antiquities Act abuse?

The wheels of justice grind slowly. And sometimes they come to a complete halt. That’s what happened over the past year to fishermen challenging the illegal designation of a 5,000 … ›

What next for President Trump’s reconsideration of national monuments?

Yesterday was the deadline for public comments on the Department of Interior’s recommendation to the President about what to do about the 27 large national monuments established since the Clinton administration.

Law professors argue the President can't revoke national monuments (and implicitly that Congress can't either)

We’ve written a lot lately about past Presidents’ abuse of the Antiquities Act and President Trump’s opportunity to reconsider some of those abuses. A few weeks ago, the President issued … ›

President Trump orders review of 21 years of Antiquities Act abuse

This morning, President Trump issued an executive order requiring the Department of Interior to review 21 years of national monument designations. That review is long overdue. For decades, Presidents have … ›

Video: Presidential Authority to Revoke or Reduce National Monument Designations

This week, PLF’s Todd Gaziano and Professor John Yoo (who is also a new member of PLF’s Board of Trustees) released a new study that explains why President Trump has the authority to reduce or revoke national monuments.

Are all of Obama’s national monuments permanent? A new AEI paper says no

A few weeks before he left office, President Obama abused the Antiquities Act of 1906 again to proclaim 1.35 million acres in Utah and 300,000 acres in Nevada to be new national monuments. White House officials claimed that both monuments were “permanent” because there was no express authority to reverse them.

Is the ocean "land owned or controlled by the Federal government"?

As President Obama’s final term came to a close, he engaged in what has unfortunately become a favorite pastime for lame duck Presidents: trying to build a legacy by abusing … ›

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If courts are ever going to strike down an illegal national monument, this’ll be it

Often, it seems the federal government has it out for the English language. The President and federal agencies routinely twist the words in statutes beyond recognition. For instance, PLF has … ›

In Northeast Canyons monument case, will President Trump follow the Secretary of Interior’s recommendation to lift illegal fishing prohibitions or will he defend his predecessor’s Antiquities Act abuse?

The wheels of justice grind slowly. And sometimes they come to a complete halt. That’s what happened over the past year to fishermen challenging the illegal designation of a 5,000 … ›

What next for President Trump’s reconsideration of national monuments?

Yesterday was the deadline for public comments on the Department of Interior’s recommendation to the President about what to do about the 27 large national monuments established since the Clinton administration.

Law professors argue the President can't revoke national monuments (and implicitly that Congress can't either)

We’ve written a lot lately about past Presidents’ abuse of the Antiquities Act and President Trump’s opportunity to reconsider some of those abuses. A few weeks ago, the President issued … ›

President Trump orders review of 21 years of Antiquities Act abuse

This morning, President Trump issued an executive order requiring the Department of Interior to review 21 years of national monument designations. That review is long overdue. For decades, Presidents have … ›

Video: Presidential Authority to Revoke or Reduce National Monument Designations

This week, PLF’s Todd Gaziano and Professor John Yoo (who is also a new member of PLF’s Board of Trustees) released a new study that explains why President Trump has the authority to reduce or revoke national monuments.

Are all of Obama’s national monuments permanent? A new AEI paper says no

A few weeks before he left office, President Obama abused the Antiquities Act of 1906 again to proclaim 1.35 million acres in Utah and 300,000 acres in Nevada to be new national monuments. White House officials claimed that both monuments were “permanent” because there was no express authority to reverse them.

Is the ocean "land owned or controlled by the Federal government"?

As President Obama’s final term came to a close, he engaged in what has unfortunately become a favorite pastime for lame duck Presidents: trying to build a legacy by abusing … ›

The Morning Docket

Stay up to date with the Morning Docket, a weekly highlight of PLF's best articles, videos, and podcasts.

If courts are ever going to strike down an illegal national monument, this’ll be it

Often, it seems the federal government has it out for the English language. The President and federal agencies routinely twist the words in statutes beyond recognition. For instance, PLF has … ›

In Northeast Canyons monument case, will President Trump follow the Secretary of Interior’s recommendation to lift illegal fishing prohibitions or will he defend his predecessor’s Antiquities Act abuse?

The wheels of justice grind slowly. And sometimes they come to a complete halt. That’s what happened over the past year to fishermen challenging the illegal designation of a 5,000 … ›

What next for President Trump’s reconsideration of national monuments?

Yesterday was the deadline for public comments on the Department of Interior’s recommendation to the President about what to do about the 27 large national monuments established since the Clinton administration.

Law professors argue the President can't revoke national monuments (and implicitly that Congress can't either)

We’ve written a lot lately about past Presidents’ abuse of the Antiquities Act and President Trump’s opportunity to reconsider some of those abuses. A few weeks ago, the President issued … ›

President Trump orders review of 21 years of Antiquities Act abuse

This morning, President Trump issued an executive order requiring the Department of Interior to review 21 years of national monument designations. That review is long overdue. For decades, Presidents have … ›

Video: Presidential Authority to Revoke or Reduce National Monument Designations

This week, PLF’s Todd Gaziano and Professor John Yoo (who is also a new member of PLF’s Board of Trustees) released a new study that explains why President Trump has the authority to reduce or revoke national monuments.

Are all of Obama’s national monuments permanent? A new AEI paper says no

A few weeks before he left office, President Obama abused the Antiquities Act of 1906 again to proclaim 1.35 million acres in Utah and 300,000 acres in Nevada to be new national monuments. White House officials claimed that both monuments were “permanent” because there was no express authority to reverse them.

Is the ocean "land owned or controlled by the Federal government"?

As President Obama’s final term came to a close, he engaged in what has unfortunately become a favorite pastime for lame duck Presidents: trying to build a legacy by abusing … ›

If courts are ever going to strike down an illegal national monument, this’ll be it

Often, it seems the federal government has it out for the English language. The President and federal agencies routinely twist the words in statutes beyond recognition. For instance, PLF has … ›

In Northeast Canyons monument case, will President Trump follow the Secretary of Interior’s recommendation to lift illegal fishing prohibitions or will he defend his predecessor’s Antiquities Act abuse?

The wheels of justice grind slowly. And sometimes they come to a complete halt. That’s what happened over the past year to fishermen challenging the illegal designation of a 5,000 … ›

What next for President Trump’s reconsideration of national monuments?

Yesterday was the deadline for public comments on the Department of Interior’s recommendation to the President about what to do about the 27 large national monuments established since the Clinton administration.

Law professors argue the President can't revoke national monuments (and implicitly that Congress can't either)

We’ve written a lot lately about past Presidents’ abuse of the Antiquities Act and President Trump’s opportunity to reconsider some of those abuses. A few weeks ago, the President issued … ›

President Trump orders review of 21 years of Antiquities Act abuse

This morning, President Trump issued an executive order requiring the Department of Interior to review 21 years of national monument designations. That review is long overdue. For decades, Presidents have … ›

Video: Presidential Authority to Revoke or Reduce National Monument Designations

This week, PLF’s Todd Gaziano and Professor John Yoo (who is also a new member of PLF’s Board of Trustees) released a new study that explains why President Trump has the authority to reduce or revoke national monuments.

Are all of Obama’s national monuments permanent? A new AEI paper says no

A few weeks before he left office, President Obama abused the Antiquities Act of 1906 again to proclaim 1.35 million acres in Utah and 300,000 acres in Nevada to be new national monuments. White House officials claimed that both monuments were “permanent” because there was no express authority to reverse them.

Is the ocean "land owned or controlled by the Federal government"?

As President Obama’s final term came to a close, he engaged in what has unfortunately become a favorite pastime for lame duck Presidents: trying to build a legacy by abusing … ›