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Tag: water

August 10, 2017

Should the public trust doctrine be expanded to the use of groundwater?

This morning PLF filed this amicus brief in the California Court of Appeal for the Third District in support of the County of Siskiyou. We asked the Court of Appeal to overturn this superior court decision, which expanded public trust considerations to permits issued for the use of groundwater. Adopting the superior court’s rationale could ...

February 03, 2017

PLF asks Supreme Court to review challenge to California's mining ban

Nearly two centuries ago, the Supreme Court recognized that the “unavoidable consequence” of the Constitution’s Supremacy Clause is that States have “no power … to retard, impede, burden, or in any manner control” federal policies that are otherwise consistent with the Constitution. California, unfortunately, has ...

September 26, 2016

Should unelected, unaccountable bureaucrats have free rein to regulate whatever they please?

PLF argues “no,” in an amicus brief supporting four states, industry groups, and an Indian tribe in their challenge to the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) unlawful fracking regulation. It purports to regulate all fracking on federal lands based on the potential impacts of fracking to underground drinking water sources, despite t ...

June 09, 2016

Bureaucrats shouldn't be able to escape legal scrutiny

Yesterday, Townhall published my op-ed highlighting the importance of PLF’s big, unanimous Supreme Court win in our Hawkes case (and its predecessor, Sackett) and whether these cases foreshadow anything for one of our cases currently pending before the Court. As regular readers know, the Supreme Court ruled in PLF’s favor in Hawkes, ho ...

May 10, 2016

Our fight with EPA: Andy Johnson's story in his own words

As we reported yesterday, Andy Johnson’s case challenging an illegal compliance order demanding he rip out his stock pond on pain of tens of millions in potential fines has settled. The following is Andy Johnson’s story in his own words. ...

May 09, 2016

Settlement in Wyoming stock pond case

The Johnson family's long ordeal with EPA, concerning their construction of an environmentally-friendly stock pond on their private property, is finally over. After ordering Andy Johnson to remove the pond, on pain of tens of millions of dollars in potential fines, the federal government has agreed to settle the case. Importantly, under the settlem ...

May 03, 2016

PLF to National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners: “Yes, the WOTUS rule is as bad as it seems—in fact, it’s probably worse.”

Over the last two years since it was proposed, the “waters of the United States” or “WOTUS rule” has ruffled more than a few feathers. As soon as the rule was published for comment, industry groups, local governments, and others affected by the rule all prepared to voice their concerns and defend their interests against ...

April 04, 2016

What if the Clean Water Act is unconstitutionally vague?

As regular readers know, PLF argued a case in the Supreme Court of the United States last week, U.S. Army Corps v. Hawkes Co., concerning whether property owners can have their day in court when the federal government declares their land subject to federal control. During the oral argument, Justice Kennedy — long-considered the “swing ...

February 08, 2016

Poll: Residents of Chesapeake Bay watershed don’t trust federal micro-management

According to a Morning Consult poll sponsored by the American Farm Bureau Federation, Chesapeake Bay residents prefer state and local governments to federal regulators when it comes to protecting local water resources and regulating land use. The poll sought opinions from Chesapeake Bay watershed voters on a range of issues related to the EPA's Che ...

February 05, 2016

If they can take your property there, they'll take it anywhere…

In 1851, the Civil War had yet to start. Abraham Lincoln was a country lawyer from Illinois. And Dr. Benjamin Brandreth, patriarch of the Brandreth family, bought a plot of land from the State of New York that included non-navigable waterways. The Brandreth family—a bit larger than in 1851, but the familial descendants of that ...

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