Sam Chang

Director of Information Technology Sacramento

Sam Chang joined PLF’s Sacramento office in March 2017.  Sam directs the Information Technology department and has been entrusted to help architect the future of PLF’s network infrastructure.

Born and raised in Sacramento, CA.  Sam studied Aeronautical Engineering at the University of California, Davis before entering into the Legal Technology field in 2005.

Microsoft and CompTIA+ certified, Sam has over 15 years of experience in the Information Technology field.  Prior to joining Pacific Legal Foundation, Sam spent 8 years as the IT Manager at the law firm, Nelson & Kennard (Sacramento, CA.)

Having a desire to give his career a greater sense of purpose, Sam was drawn to PLF’s mission to defend individual liberty and private property.

Sam’s motto in life is simple, “to be completely dedicated in everything you do, while maintaining a work-life balance”.

Outside of PLF, you’ll find Sam chasing around his three boys or competing at a local poker tournament.

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July 21, 2021

Governor Andrew Cuomo’s gun violence emergency order shows why unchecked executive powers are so dangerous

During the COVID-19 pandemic, governors across the country claimed extraordinary emergency power. For weeks and then for months and then for over a year, they used this purported authority to unilaterally shut down businesses, enact health and safety measures, and issue sweeping emergency orders. Such broad emergency power may have made sense in th ...

July 19, 2021

The Chicago Tribune: Coach houses expand Chicago’s housing availability. The city should fully embrace them.

It's not often that Chicago's City Council passes a housing law that can benefit nearly every Chicagoan. But the city did exactly that when it took its first—albeit tepid—step toward lifting its half-century ban on Accessory Dwelling Units (ADU's), or as they're more commonly known, coach houses or granny flats. In December last year, the ...

July 19, 2021

The Hill: Biden’s Education Department must choose accountability or a ‘Marbury v. Madison’ moment

The Biden presidency largely has been hailed as a return to normalcy, transparency and accountability following the tumultuous years of the Trump administration. Why then, is Biden's Department of Education refusing to allow one of its most important oversight boards to meet? The National Board for Education Sciences (NBES) is an advisory committee ...

July 16, 2021

The time has come to end discrimination in public education

Right now, the Supreme Court has given the government the opportunity to weigh in on a case in which Asian-American applicants allege discrimination by Harvard's Admissions Committee. Another suit, alleging anti-Asian discrimination at Yale, has been filed in federal district court. Some selective high schools have also revamped their admissions pr ...

July 16, 2021

Daily Journal: The High Court upholds nonprofit donors’ constitutional right to privacy

To anyone considering donating to a nonprofit organization (and I know a few good ones!), I have some great news: The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld your constitutional right to privacy of association. On July 1, in a 6-3 opinion in Americans for Prosperity Foundation v. Bonta, 2021 DJDAR 6702, the Supreme Court struck down ...

July 16, 2021

Agency bureaucrats can’t ignore Marbury v. Madison

***Editor’s note: The Department of Education ignored our demand letter and failed to call the NBES meeting, so now we are seeking the NBES meeting in Court so Hanke, Yoo and NBES can carry out their oversight duties.   History and civics classes across the country teach the importance of political accountability for preserving individua ...

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