Articles

You’re never too old to make history

February 01, 2023 | By BRITTANY HUNTER

For most people, retirement means some well-deserved rest and reflection. It’s a time to travel, indulge grandkids, and enjoy the fruits of a life well lived. But for a select few, the golden years come with an extra layer of excitement. They aren’t just resting and relaxing, they’re taking action and making an impact on … ...

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Earth, wind, and water : 1970s activists and the administrative state

January 25, 2023 | By FRANK GARRISON

In the late 1970S, two sociologists asked: Where had all the 1960s radical activists—the countercultural voices who clamored for a revolution—ended up in the seventies? The answer, published in a 1980 study, was somewhat startling: Many former radicals were now working in or with the government. They were no longer fighting “the Man.R ...

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The Hill : National Merit award scandal is the latest chapter in TJ’s war on achievement

January 23, 2023 | By ERIN WILCOX

Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology is in hot water with parents again. Administrators used “equity” as a justification for withholding information from students that may impact the trajectory of their academic futures. In the final weeks of 2022, Thomas Jefferson parent Shawna Yashar made an odd discovery. Her son h ...

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High school harpists are not criminals

January 19, 2023 | By CALEB TROTTER

Colorado high school sophomore Taryn Petruncola has played the harp since she was six years old. Aside from the joy that playing the harp brings Taryn, she also enjoys helping others. Through the years, she’s played for nursing homes and even during a family member’s funeral. As part of a business class that Taryn recently … ...

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The Hill : 11 states have ended judicial deference to executive agencies — more should follow their lead

January 17, 2023 | By DANIEL DEW

In federal and state courts around the country, Americans often face an uneven playing field when they square off against executive agencies, thanks to doctrines that require judges to rubber stamp agency interpretations of the law. And while the Supreme Court may be slow-walking the end of Chevron and Auer deference in the federal courts, … ...

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Reluctant heroes may be our only hope in the fight for equality

January 17, 2023 | By ANDREW QUINIO

“Why don’t you take a look around? You know what’s about to happen, what they’re up against. They could use a good pilot like you. You’re turning your back on them.” As the Galactic Empire closed in, Luke Skywalker was desperate for Han Solo to take up the Rebel cause. From the start of the … ...

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Landlords of Alameda County : How an eviction ban stole one couple’s American Dream

January 11, 2023 | By BRITTANY HUNTER

In Alameda County, California, a pandemic-era eviction ban has been in place for almost three years, even though COVID no longer poses the same threat it once did. As a result, “mom and pop” landlords have found themselves losing their livelihoods and dealing with problematic, and sometimes violent, tenants with no way to get rid ̷ ...

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The Federalist : How A Cat With A Gunshot Wound Is Bringing Property Rights Disputes Before The Supreme Court

January 09, 2023 | By JIM MANLEY

Not many cases involving speeding and littering end up before the U.S. Supreme Court. Fewer still involve shooting a cat. Hardly any will set national policy for property rights disputes involving 620 million acres of federal lands. On Nov. 30, the Supreme Court heard arguments in just such a case. At issue in Wilkins v. … ...

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California Globe : Malibu Doubles Down on Anti-ADU Stance 

January 09, 2023 | By DAVID DEERSON

In August 2021, the Malibu City Council refused to let a family build an addition to their home for their 80 plus year old, disabled grandmother. Councilmembers claimed they understood the importance of her situation and wanted to help, but—gosh-darn-it—their hands were tied by the law, which simply wouldn’t allow them to grant the permit ...