Christina M. Martin

Attorney

Florida

Christina Martin is an attorney at PLF’s Florida office in Palm Beach Gardens. She litigates cases around the country to protect individual rights, property rights, and the rule of law.  She is admitted to the state bars of Florida and Oregon, as well as various federal courts, including the Supreme Court of the United States.

Since graduating law school in 2008, Christina has dedicated her career to advancing liberty and limiting the reach of government.  She started by working at a think tank, developing and advocating policies to limit state government and promote educational options for K-12 students.

During this time, she met a PLF client who faced significant fines and whose small moving business would have been shut down without PLF’s help.  Oregon law effectively gave competitors the power to ban new moving businesses. A PLF lawsuit challenged the law and swiftly ended the unfair regulation. From that time on, she was a huge PLF fan.

In 2012, Christina joined PLF to litigate for liberty. Since then, she has sued the government for stealing from individuals, violating free speech, and ignoring the very rules that the government is charged to uphold.

She still enjoys developing policy ideas for laws that better recognize and protect unalienable rights, but now she sues the government to protect individuals when the government violates those rights.

Christina earned a Bachelor of Science in Physics and a Bachelor of Arts in Communication from the University of Washington in Seattle. She earned her J.D. from Ave Maria School of Law in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and was an editor of the Ave Maria Law Review.

When not working, Christina enjoys painting landscapes and traveling with her husband.

Christina Martin is an attorney at PLF’s Florida office in Palm Beach Gardens. She litigates cases around the country to protect individual rights, property rights, and the rule of law.  She is admitted to the state bars of Florida and Oregon, as well as various federal courts, including the Supreme Court of the United States.

Since graduating law school in 2008, Christina has dedicated her career to advancing liberty and limiting the reach of government.  She started by working at a think tank, developing and advocating policies to limit state government and promote educational options for K-12 students.

During this time, she met a PLF client who faced significant fines and whose small moving business would have been shut down without PLF’s help.  Oregon law effectively gave competitors the power to ban new moving businesses. A PLF lawsuit challenged the law and swiftly ended the unfair regulation. From that time on, she was a huge PLF fan.

In 2012, Christina joined PLF to litigate for liberty. Since then, she has sued the government for stealing from individuals, violating free speech, and ignoring the very rules that the government is charged to uphold.

She still enjoys developing policy ideas for laws that better recognize and protect unalienable rights, but now she sues the government to protect individuals when the government violates those rights.

Christina earned a Bachelor of Science in Physics and a Bachelor of Arts in Communication from the University of Washington in Seattle. She earned her J.D. from Ave Maria School of Law in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and was an editor of the Ave Maria Law Review.

When not working, Christina enjoys painting landscapes and traveling with her husband.

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Procedural Guarantees

American Federation of Aviculture v. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Thriving golden parakeets no longer need Endangered Species Act protection

Thanks to the efforts of private breeders, the golden parakeet is no longer threatened with extinction. Although the federal government acknowledges the bird’s tenfold increase in numbers, it has refused to comply with a law that requires it to make a final decision to delist or downlist the parakeet within 12 months of that finding. On behalf of a coalition of breeders and bird owners, the American Federation of Aviculture, PLF is suing the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to force it to comply with the law, reclassify the golden parakeet, and lift onerous restrictions that prevent breeders from selling to all other breeders.

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Property Rights

Ganson v. City of Marathon, Florida

Florida decides couple’s land is for the birds

The Beyer family owns a 9-acre island off the Florida coast that was reclassified from a general zoning designation to a bird rookery that permitted no use of the property other than temporary camping. Instead of offering compensation for this taking of property, as required by the Fifth Amendment, the city offered the Beyers only transferable development credits toward possible purchase of a limited number of development permits in other locations.

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Personal Liberties

Krause v. School Board of Indian River County, Florida

Florida student teaches school a lesson about free speech

In May of his junior year at Vero Beach High School, J.P. Krause was on the verge of winning the senior class president election when he gave an impromptu campaign speech in his AP U.S. History class, with his teacher’s permission. The 90-second humorous speech skewered some of the tropes of the Trump campaign – “my opponent will raise taxes!” – and contained other satirical remarks. Krause won the election, but then his principal disqualified him from taking office because his speech allegedly “humiliated” the second-place finisher, in violation of the district’s anti-harassment policy. When PLF, representing J.P. and his mother, informed the school district by letter that its actions violated the First Amendment, the district quickly reversed course and reinstated J.P. as senior class president.

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By Christina M. Martin

PLF asks the Supreme Court to stop government theft in tax-foreclosure case

This week, we filed our reply brief in Wayside Church v. Van Buren County, a case we are asking the Supreme Court to review.  This case began in 2014, when … ›

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By Christina M. Martin

PLF asks Supreme Court to secure property owners’ path to takings claim

This week, PLF filed this amicus brief in Beach Group Investments, Inc v Florida Department of Environmental Protection  This case raises yet another example of how the lower courts are struggling to interpret the Supreme Court’s “final decision ripeness” rule in takings claims The takings ripeness doctrine requires a final administrative decision to ensure that property owners come to court with a cleanly postured property rights claim Usually this means that property owners must actually apply for at least one permit to use their property before they can go to court and allege that the government unconstitutionally deprived them of the ability to make economic use of

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By Christina M. Martin

Groups ask Supreme Court to grant PLF’s petition in Wayside Church v. Van Buren County

This week several groups filed “friend of the court” briefs supporting PLF’s Supreme Court petition in Wayside Church v Van Buren County

Two of the amicus briefs—one by AARP and the other by the Buckeye Institute—focus on the need for the Court to review Michigan’s unjust tax foreclosure law Under this unjust and unconstitutional law, Van Buren County took Wayside Church’s property, sold it for $206,000 to pay around $16,750 in property taxes, penalties, fees, and interest The County then pocketed all of the remaining profit as a windfall Similarly, the county took the farm and home where Henderson Hodgens grew up, and sold it for $47,750 to pay

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By Christina M. Martin

Michigan turns foreclosure into a government self-enrichment machine

Today, National Review published my article discussing, Wayside Church v Van Buren County, PLF’s case challenging legalized theft in Michigan Michigan’s unjust property tax law allows local governments to steal from people who fall behind on their property taxes As I explain in the article,

Can the government take your home and all your equity in it if you fall behind on your property taxes or — like many people in Flint, Mich — refuse to pay your water bill? The state of Michigan and a handful of other states think so These states’ odd tax laws allow counties to take and sell tax-delinquent properties and keep all the

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By Christina M. Martin

PLF sues to end counterproductive golden parakeet regulations

Today, PLF filed a lawsuit in federal court to force the US Fish and Wildlife Service to obey the law and issue a decision on the American Federation of Aviculture’s petition to remove the golden parakeet from the list of protected species under the Endangered Species Act

The federal government listed the golden parakeet, also known as the golden conure or Queen of Bavaria, as endangered in the 1970s At one time, experts estimated its population at 1,000-2,500 Today, experts estimate 10,000-20,000 golden parakeets As a result, the IUCN Red list of Threatened Species reclassified the bird from endangered to “vulnerable”

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By Christina M. Martin

PLF asks Supreme Court to stop Michigan from stealing

When Wayside Church fell behind on its 2011 property taxes on a parcel that the church had used as a youth camp, Van Buren County took the youth camp property and sold it for $206,000 to pay the church’s $16,750 in taxes, penalties, interest, and fees The County kept the surplus proceeds—$189,250 more than the debt—as a windfall Similarly, the County sold Myron Stahl’s property, where he was building his retirement home, for $68,750 to pay a $25,000 debt It also sold Henderson Hodgens’s farm and home for $47,750 to pay a $5,900 debt The County kept the surplus from these each of these sales

Today, PLF petitioned

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