Christina M. Martin

Attorney

Florida

Christina Martin is an attorney at PLF’s Florida office in Palm Beach Gardens. She litigates cases around the country to protect individual rights, property rights, and the rule of law.  She is admitted to the state bars of Florida and Oregon, as well as various federal courts, including the Supreme Court of the United States.

Since graduating law school in 2008, Christina has dedicated her career to advancing liberty and limiting the reach of government.  She started by working at a think tank, developing and advocating policies to limit state government and promote educational options for K-12 students.

During this time, she met a PLF client who faced significant fines and whose small moving business would have been shut down without PLF’s help.  Oregon law effectively gave competitors the power to ban new moving businesses. A PLF lawsuit challenged the law and swiftly ended the unfair regulation. From that time on, she was a huge PLF fan.

In 2012, Christina joined PLF to litigate for liberty. Since then, she has sued the government for stealing from individuals, violating free speech, and ignoring the very rules that the government is charged to uphold.

She still enjoys developing policy ideas for laws that better recognize and protect unalienable rights, but now she sues the government to protect individuals when the government violates those rights.

Christina earned a Bachelor of Science in Physics and a Bachelor of Arts in Communication from the University of Washington in Seattle. She earned her J.D. from Ave Maria School of Law in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and was an editor of the Ave Maria Law Review.

When not working, Christina enjoys painting landscapes and traveling with her husband.

Christina Martin is an attorney at PLF’s Florida office in Palm Beach Gardens. She litigates cases around the country to protect individual rights, property rights, and the rule of law.  She is admitted to the state bars of Florida and Oregon, as well as various federal courts, including the Supreme Court of the United States.

Since graduating law school in 2008, Christina has dedicated her career to advancing liberty and limiting the reach of government.  She started by working at a think tank, developing and advocating policies to limit state government and promote educational options for K-12 students.

During this time, she met a PLF client who faced significant fines and whose small moving business would have been shut down without PLF’s help.  Oregon law effectively gave competitors the power to ban new moving businesses. A PLF lawsuit challenged the law and swiftly ended the unfair regulation. From that time on, she was a huge PLF fan.

In 2012, Christina joined PLF to litigate for liberty. Since then, she has sued the government for stealing from individuals, violating free speech, and ignoring the very rules that the government is charged to uphold.

She still enjoys developing policy ideas for laws that better recognize and protect unalienable rights, but now she sues the government to protect individuals when the government violates those rights.

Christina earned a Bachelor of Science in Physics and a Bachelor of Arts in Communication from the University of Washington in Seattle. She earned her J.D. from Ave Maria School of Law in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and was an editor of the Ave Maria Law Review.

When not working, Christina enjoys painting landscapes and traveling with her husband.

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Personal Liberties

Taylor v. Polhill, et al

Florida’s outdated licensing robs hearing, livelihoods

In Florida, you need a license to sell hearing aids. Dan Taylor of Melbourne, Florida, gave up his license after 30 years, because Florida’s outdated regulations were made for older models, not the updated, technologically sophisticated models he and his customers prefer. In a federal lawsuit on behalf of Dan, PLF argues that Florida’s licensing scheme increases cost and reduces access to modern hearing aids—and they’re even preempted by federal laws aimed at reducing unnecessary regulation.

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Property Rights

Rafaeli, LLC v. Oakland County

Michigan County Steals House for $8 Debt

In 2014, Oakland County, Michigan foreclosed on a home owned by Uri Rafaeli’s business—Rafaeli, LLC—over an $8.41 tax debt. The County sold the property for $24,500, and kept profits. Ditto for Andre Ohanessian, when the County seized and sold his property for $82,000, and pocketed every penny left over from the $6,000 tax debt. While most states refund the surplus, Michigan is among a handful of states that allow property theft to fill government coffers. PLF has asked the Michigan Supreme Court to strike down this bureaucratic theft and restore our clients’ constitutional rights.

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Property Rights

Coastal Rights Coalition v. California Coastal Commission

California coastal homeowners at risk by Coastal Commission’s illegal seawall policy

When coastal property owners seek permits for new residential development, the California Coastal Commission requires them to agree never to build a seawall to protect the structure from storms and erosion. This policy was imposed by fiat, without public notice, hearings, and opportunity for public comment, as required by the California Administrative Procedure Act.

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By Christina M. Martin

PLF asks Supreme Court to revive property rights protections

Yesterday, PLF filed a petition asking the Supreme Court to review a decision that diminishes property rights by throwing unnecessary obstacles to raising Fifth Amendment claims. The story behind this case … ›

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By Christina M. Martin

Eleventh Circuit Vindicates Chmielewski Family’s Property Rights

Today, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit issued an excellent opinion in Chmielewski v. City of St. Pete Beach. In this case, the City of St. Pete … ›

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By Christina M. Martin

Florida ends Walton County’s unconstitutional land grab

On Friday, Florida Governor Rick Scott signed House Bill 631, ending Walton County’s attempt to steal free access to the private property of PLF’s clients Edward and Delanie Goodwin and … ›

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By Christina M. Martin

PLF asks Michigan Supreme Court to stop theft by tax collectors

For the sake of justice, the Michigan Supreme Court should step in and secure to Uri Rafaeli, Andre Ohanessian, and people across Michigan what rightfully belongs to them.

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By Christina M. Martin

PLF announces appeal to illegal jaguar rule

The designation of critical habitat for jaguar in New Mexico unnecessarily ties thousands of acres of land in red tape. The rule makes it harder for ranchers to get grazing permits, build corrals, stock ponds, or additional fences.

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By Christina M. Martin

PLF Asks Michigan Supreme Court to Hold Government Accountable for Theft

PLF filed an application asking the Michigan Supreme Court to grant review and bring justice to Uri Rafaeli—who lost an entire home to Oakland County over an $8 debt, and to Andrew Ohanessian—who lost 2.7 acres over a $6,000 debt.

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