Daniel Woislaw

Attorney

Daniel Woislaw joined Pacific Legal Foundation in the spring of 2019. A passionate advocate for individual liberty, he focuses his litigation on property rights, economic liberty, and regulatory overreach. He was inspired as a student by the works of free-market economists and classical liberal political philosophers such as F.A. Hayek and Frédéric Bastiat.

As a former public defender, Daniel gained a great deal of experience arguing constitutional questions surrounding Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendment rights in trial courts in southern Virginia. Before that, he worked as a legal aid attorney under a grant from the Department of Justice to represent elderly victims of crime and abuse.

His initial interest in pursuing a career litigating for a free society developed while studying at The Antonin Scalia Law School at George Mason University, from which he graduated magna cum laude in the spring of 2016. During his tenure, he was the senior research editor of George Mason’s Civil Rights Law Journal, served on the school’s moot court board, and spent one summer as a Charles Koch Fellow. He has published scholarly articles on the topics of unreasonable searches and sovereign immunity, with more in progress.

When he is not fighting for liberty in the courts, Daniel enjoys haranguing his friends into playing long, complicated strategy board games or whipping up something fabulous in his kitchen with one or more of the many contraptions he has accumulated over the years. He resides in northern Virginia with his wife, Julia, and two small, spoiled dogs named Peaches and Peanut.

Hanke and Yoo v. Secretary Cardona

Educrats can’t ignore oversight board members appointed by the previous administration

In the final months of the previous administration, the president appointed several people to serve on the National Board for Education Sciences (NBES)—a board that advises officials within the agency on research and funding priorities. But the U.S. Department of Education refuses to deliver the appointees’ signed commissions, which are pro ...

Goodwood Brewing Company, LLC v. Beshear

Kentucky restaurants are challenging Gov. Beshear’s never-ending emergency powers

Since the pandemic began a year ago, Kentucky Governor Andy Beshear has used his emergency powers to unilaterally enact COVID-19-related policies. In February, the legislature overwhelmingly voted to rein in his authority, passing three bills to limit the governor’s use of pandemic-related emergency orders. Gov. Beshear immediately filed suit ...

Burke v. Raimondo, et al.

Governments’ misguided battle threatens California fishermen and their way of life.

Swordfish is a very popular seafood and one of the most abundant types of fish on the West Coast. It is also a significant source of income and way of life for many California families. But federal legal changes threatened to wipe out longtime family-owned businesses, as well as the entire domestic swordfish supply. The new rule supposedly aimed to ...

Preserve Responsible Shoreline Management (PRSM) v. City of Bainbridge Island; Olympic Stewardship Foundation (OSF) v. Growth Management Hearings Board

Coastal property rights run aground in Washington State

Coastal counties in Washington State passed “critical areas” ordinances requiring all shoreline property owners to dedicate a “buffer” zone and a strip of their beach property to the public as a mandatory condition on any new development. The counties assert this purported power under the state’s Shoreline Management A ...

Latest Posts

See All Posts
September 17, 2021

Daily Journal: California law gives people the right to build ADUs. Cities need to let them. 

Decades of underbuilding, largely due to red tape imposed by prohibitive land use laws, has pushed California into a housing crisis. Apartments and homes have never been more expensive. That's why state lawmakers passed laws giving Californians the right to build accessory dwelling units — also known as in-law suites or granny flats. ADUs often ...

September 14, 2021

ADU reform: what good is a law if it’s not enforced?

The California legislature has passed revolutionary legislation in the past few years that makes it easier for residents to build additional housing in the form of accessory dwelling units (ADUs), more recognizable to some as granny flats, basement apartments, or small backyard cottages. These new reforms, which remove costly and complicated barrie ...

August 12, 2021

Federal tire-chalking case to answer big constitutional questions

When attorneys Phil Ellison and Matt Gronda saw a meter maid chalking someone's car tire outside the courthouse in Saginaw, Michigan, they decided to make a federal case of it. After all, a car is private property, they reasoned, and leaving a chalk-line behind on it to find out if it moves is a "search." ...

July 19, 2021

The Hill: Biden’s Education Department must choose accountability or a ‘Marbury v. Madison’ moment

The Biden presidency largely has been hailed as a return to normalcy, transparency and accountability following the tumultuous years of the Trump administration. Why then, is Biden's Department of Education refusing to allow one of its most important oversight boards to meet? The National Board for Education Sciences (NBES) is an advisory committee ...

April 08, 2021

Can the police enter your house and take your stuff without a warrant?

Can the police enter your home and confiscate your weapons without a warrant? That's the question the Supreme Court is getting ready to decide in Caniglia v. Strom. But the answer won't be found in the Second Amendment. Instead, the Court will consider whether the police violated a Rhode Island man's Fourth Amendment right against ...

March 24, 2021

The Courier-Journal: Lawsuit amid COVID-19 seeks end to Beshear’s rule by never-ending emergency decrees

For the past year, Gov. Andy Beshear and his public health administration have ruled over the people of Kentucky through unending executive orders instructing people and businesses how to conduct themselves during the pandemic. On Feb. 2, the clock began to run down on those powers. And on March 5, the clock ran out. It's ...

Donate