Daniel Woislaw

Attorney DC

Daniel Woislaw joined Pacific Legal Foundation in the spring of 2019. A passionate advocate for individual liberty, he focuses his litigation on property rights, economic liberty, and regulatory overreach. He was inspired as a student by the works of free-market economists and classical liberal political philosophers such as F.A. Hayek and Frédéric Bastiat.

As a former public defender, Daniel gained a great deal of experience arguing constitutional questions surrounding Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendment rights in trial courts in southern Virginia. Before that, he worked as a legal aid attorney under a grant from the Department of Justice to represent elderly victims of crime and abuse.

His initial interest in pursuing a career litigating for a free society developed while studying at The Antonin Scalia Law School at George Mason University, from which he graduated magna cum laude in the spring of 2016. During his tenure, he was the senior research editor of George Mason’s Civil Rights Law Journal, served on the school’s moot court board, and spent one summer as a Charles Koch Fellow. He has published scholarly articles on the topics of unreasonable searches and sovereign immunity, with more in progress.

When he is not fighting for liberty in the courts, Daniel enjoys haranguing his friends into playing long, complicated strategy board games or whipping up something fabulous in his kitchen with one or more of the many contraptions he has accumulated over the years. He resides in northern Virginia with his wife, Julia, and two small, spoiled dogs named Peaches and Peanut.

Goodwood Brewing Company, LLC v. Beshear

Kentucky restaurants are challenging Gov. Beshear’s never-ending emergency powers

Since the pandemic began a year ago, Kentucky Governor Andy Beshear has used his emergency powers to unilaterally enact COVID-19-related policies. In February, the legislature overwhelmingly voted to rein in his authority, passing three bills to limit the governor’s use of pandemic-related emergency orders. Gov. Beshear immediately filed suit ...

Lawsuits filed to preserve swordfish industry and livelihoods Abad, et al. v. Bonham, et al. and Williams, et al. v. Ross, et al.

Governments’ misguided battle threatens California fishermen and their way of life.

Swordfish is a very popular seafood and one of the most abundant types of fish on the West Coast. It is also a primary source of income and way of life for many California families. But recent legal changes at the state and federal levels threaten to wipe out longtime family-owned businesses as well as the entire domestic swordfish supply. The new ...

Latest Posts

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April 08, 2021

Can the police enter your house and take your stuff without a warrant?

Can the police enter your home and confiscate your weapons without a warrant? That's the question the Supreme Court is getting ready to decide in Caniglia v. Strom. But the answer won't be found in the Second Amendment. Instead, the Court will consider whether the police violated a Rhode Island man's Fourth Amendment right against ...

March 24, 2021

The Courier-Journal: Lawsuit amid COVID-19 seeks end to Beshear’s rule by never-ending emergency decrees

For the past year, Gov. Andy Beshear and his public health administration have ruled over the people of Kentucky through unending executive orders instructing people and businesses how to conduct themselves during the pandemic. On Feb. 2, the clock began to run down on those powers. And on March 5, the clock ran out. It's ...

February 22, 2021

The Magna Carta, property rights, and the right of exclusion

In 1215, a group of powerful barons in England rebelled against the tyrant King John's exercise of arbitrary power, forcing him to sign one of the most important documents in human history: The Magna Carta Libertatum, the Great Charter of Liberties. Before this document came into existence, the king made a habit of traveling around ...

August 24, 2020

The Hill: Pandemic or not, the regulators are cooking up bad news for bakers

As we enter our sixth month of pandemic life, amateur bakers and chefs are looking to turn their skills in the kitchen into a little extra cash by selling their culinary creations online or in their local communities. This popular trend, however, comes with a sea of red tape and threats of home intrusion. It ...

June 24, 2020

Supreme Court must remind law enforcement that not even the police are above the law

In 2015, an armed shoplifter fleeing the police broke into the Lech family's home in Greenwood Village, Colorado. The shoplifter, who chose the Lech's house at random, refused to come out and opened fire on the cops outside. In response, local police used explosives, high-caliber ammunition and a battering ram mounted on a tank-like vehicle ...

May 18, 2020

This Massachusetts town tried shutting off some residents’ water to combat COVID-19, but that’s unconstitutional

Attempting to prevent the spread of COVID-19 infections, officials in the town of Salisbury, Massachusetts, recently deprived seasonal homeowners of the right to receive running water in their homes. The reasoning was that if these homeowners couldn't access the town's public water utility, they wouldn't return to Salisbury for the vacation season ...

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