Elizabeth Slattery

Senior Legal Fellow & Deputy Director, Center for the Separation of Powers DC

Elizabeth Slattery is a senior legal fellow and deputy director of PLF’s Center for the Separation of Powers. She’s an evangelist for the separation of powers, spreading the good news about the Constitution’s greatest protection for Americans’ individual liberties.

Elizabeth has written for the Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy, the Cato Supreme Court Review, and The Federalist Society Review, among other publications, and her work on the need to end improper judicial deference to federal regulators was cited by Justice Neil Gorsuch. Her opinion pieces have appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, SCOTUSblog, National Review Online, and many other outlets. She has testified before Congress and is a frequent legal commentator in print, radio, and television. As creator and former host of a popular podcast about the Supreme Court, she captivated listeners around the world with her interviews and trivia segments.

Elizabeth is also one of the authors of PLF’s recent report “The Regulatory State’s Due Process Deficits.”

Elizabeth previously worked at The Heritage Foundation and is a member of The Federalist Society’s Civil Rights Practice Group Executive Committee, the Maryland State Advisory Committee of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, and the American Bar Association’s Public Education Division.

She’s a graduate of Xavier University, where she studied history and music and where the Jesuits taught her to question everything. She received her J.D. from George Mason University’s Antonin Scalia Law School.

In her free time, you can find Elizabeth chasing her two young sons, reading historical fiction, playing Jeopardy! with her husband, and (in a nod to her Kentucky roots) drinking bourbon.

 

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September 19, 2020

Fox News: Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a lioness of the law

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who served for 27 years on the U.S. Supreme Court, passed away on Friday. When her longtime friend and fellow opera fan, Justice Antonin Scalia, died in 2016, Ginsburg lamented that the court would be a "paler place" without her ideological opponent and debate partner. The court will be an even ...

September 09, 2020

The Hill: How agencies should implement the regulatory ‘bill of rights’

Last week, President Trump's regulatory czar Paul Ray, head of the Office of Management and Budget's Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA), issued a "best practices" memo instructing executive departments and agencies how to implement the regulatory bill of rights issued a few months ago. This builds on President Trump's May 19 execut ...

June 15, 2020

The Hill: The First Amendment protects attorneys from compelled speech

Imagine being forced, as the price of doing business, to pay for a trade association's speech on gun control, immigration, abortion, affirmative action, and many other hot-button political issues. That's the situation attorneys in many states face just to do their jobs. Whether or not they agree with the bar association's political and ideological ...

May 26, 2020

The Wall Street Journal: It’s about time we got a Bill of Rights for the regulatory state

One of the first actions of Congress in 1789 was proposing a bill of rights that limited government power and guaranteed the liberties of the American people. Power has since shifted from Congress to an unaccountable regulatory state, but there is no equivalent bill of rights to limit its power or protect liberty in the ...

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