Ethan W. Blevins

Attorney Washington

Ethan Blevins joined PLF in August 2014 and works in Salt Lake City, Utah. He litigates cases involving the First Amendment, property rights, and the separation of powers.

Ethan began his trek toward liberty after moving to China in his late teens. He had grown up admiring his great uncle, who had moved to China during the Communist Revolution. Throughout his youth and early adulthood, Ethan believed in those faulty ideals. His time in China, where he studied martial arts full time, started to break that spell. While there, he saw the poverty, corruption, and oppression that are the true legacies of communism. Over time, he became convinced that only individual liberty can bring about peace, prosperity, and human potential.

Ethan began his legal career at Duke University, where he received his JD and an LLM in international and comparative law. He then clerked for Justice Don Willett of the Supreme Court of Texas—a true friend to liberty. Inspired by Justice Willett’s staunch belief in individual rights, Ethan decided to devote his legal career to freedom.

Outside of work, Ethan is a husband, father, and geek. He is in the process of publishing his debut novel, the first installment of a fantasy series. When he isn’t chasing around his four small children, he writes fantasy, plays nerdy games at a local gaming store, and serves in a local church congregation.

Skyworks Ltd. v. Centers for Disease Control; Chambless Enterprises, LLC v. Centers for Disease Control

Fighting the CDC’s national eviction ban to restore separation of powers

In early September, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) adopted an order that prohibits certain evictions for non-payment of rent. However, in its haste to enact and enforce a national eviction ban, the CDC overstepped its lawful authority by exercising legislative power reserved to Congress, and it did so at the expense of struggl ...

Key in Lock El Papel v. City of Seattle

Fighting unlawful eviction bans masked as a pandemic response

In the wake of COVID-19, Washington State and Seattle joined a number of cities and states to enact emergency eviction bans that eliminated landlords’ ability to evict tenants who violate lease terms, such as by neglecting to pay their rent. Seattle added an ordinance that prohibits landlords from seeking full repayment for up to a year from ...

Navigable Waters Cases

Fighting government’s make-believe, illegal definition of navigable waters

The Clean Water Act (CWA) has a seemingly simple purpose: protect the navigable waters of the United States from pollution. The federal agencies charged with carrying out and enforcing the law, however, have expanded the definition of “navigable waters” several times since the Act went on the books in 1972. Represented by PLF free of ch ...

contractor Minnesota Assoc. Builders and Contractors v. Minneapolis Public School District

Bulldozing unfair, illegal union-rigged construction scheme

With 75 buildings and 35,000 students, there’s plenty of construction work in the Minneapolis School District. But many hardworking Minnesotans never get a shot at a school project. In 2004, the district adopted a project labor agreement, or PLA, that favors politically powerful unions over nonunion contractors. This type of agreement forces ...

Freedom Foundation v. Washington Dept. of Ecology

State agency Scrooge violates Santa’s First Amendment rights

Each year around the holidays, Washington-based Freedom Foundation sends staff members to the lobbies of state agency buildings. These staffers—dressed as Santa—hand out leaflets that explain state employees’ right to opt out of union dues. Allowed by most agencies, the Washington Department of Ecology in 2017 instead prohibited the leafl ...

Wilkins v. United States of America

Government bait-and-switch tramples on property rights and peace of mind

Wil Wilkins and Jane Stanton live next to Montana’s Bitterroot National Forest. A road that crosses both of their properties is the result of a limited-use easement granted to the U.S. Forest Service by the properties’ previous owners in 1962. The general public is not supposed to use the road, but in 2006 the Forest Service began adver ...

Latest Posts

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April 09, 2021

There are better ways to house people than by banning evictions

A common government response to the pandemic has been to freeze evictions to keep people housed. While these moratoria may be attractive on the surface, this shortsighted tactic will only constrict access to affordable housing. There are better paths forward. Pacific Legal Foundation has challenged several of these eviction moratoria in court (see ...

March 30, 2021

Momentum is building against the CDC eviction ban

The tide has begun to turn in the legal battle over the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's moratorium on evictions during the COVID-19 pandemic. Property owners have hammered the CDC with a flurry of lawsuits since the agency adopted an order last September barring landlords from evicting non-paying tenants. PLF is lead counsel in ...

March 11, 2021

Multiple lawsuits show how eviction bans are unjust and unconstitutional

Local governments and agencies across the country have responded to the pandemic by adopting policies that once would have been considered unfathomable in a country that values free enterprise and individual rights. Among the plethora of heavy-handed responses to COVID-19, the temporary bans on evictions, called eviction moratoriums, rank among the ...

January 08, 2021

Real Estate Issues: Seattle Housing: A Case Study in Crisis Creation

Kelly Lyles is a member of a dying breed: the mom-and-pop Seattle landlord. Her kind has become the target of an increasingly radical city council that has slammed the rental housing industry with a barrage of new-fangled policies over the last five years that protect tenants at all costs, including the cost of landlord property ...

December 01, 2020

The Salt Lake Tribune: Herbert’s unconstitutional power grab threatens state’s separation of powers

On Nov. 9, Utah Gov. Gary Herbert once again declared a state of emergency in Utah, imposing a mask mandate, limits on business activities and restrictions on social gatherings. What is most notable about the governor's actions is that this is the second time in eight months that he has limited social and business activity ...

August 20, 2020

Deseret News: How a proposed Utah Bar rule could limit lawyers’ free speech

The Utah Bar is considering a misguided rule that would impose a "code of civility" on Utah lawyers. The rule is vague, giving regulators too much discretion to punish lawyers who work on controversial issues. It will make it much harder for them to do their jobs well and limit their ability to fight for ...

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