Ethan W. Blevins

Attorney Washington

Ethan Blevins joined PLF’s Pacific Northwest office in August 2014. He litigates cases involving the First Amendment, property rights, school choice, and the separation of powers.

Ethan began his trek toward liberty after moving to China in his late teens. He had grown up admiring his great uncle, who had moved to China during the communist revolution. Throughout his youth and early adulthood, Ethan believed in those faulty ideals. His time in China, where he studied martial arts full-time, started to break that spell. While there, he witnessed the poverty, corruption, and oppression that were the true legacies of communism. Over time, he became convinced that only individual liberty can bring about peace, prosperity, and human potential. Ethan sees his work at PLF as a vital front in the fight against the bitter consequences of the statism that he witnessed living abroad.

Ethan began his legal career at Duke University, where he received his JD and an LLM in International and Comparative Law. He then clerked for Justice Don Willett of the Supreme Court of Texas—a true friend to liberty. Inspired by Justice Willett’s staunch belief in individual rights, Ethan decided to devote his legal career to freedom.

Outside work, Ethan is a husband, father, and certifiable geek. He is in the process of publishing his debut novel—the first installment in a fantasy series. When he isn’t chasing around his three small children, he writes fantasy, plays nerdy games at a local gaming store, and serves in the young men’s organization of a local church congregation.

Minnesota Assoc. Builders and Contractors v. Minneapolis Public School District

Bulldozing unfair, illegal union-rigged construction scheme

With 75 buildings and 35,000 students, there’s plenty of construction work in the Minneapolis School District. But many hardworking Minnesotans never get a shot at a school project. In 2004, the district adopted a project labor agreement, or PLA, that favors politically powerful unions over nonunion contractors. This type of agreement forces ...

Ostrewich v. Trautman

Your shirt or your vote: Fighting to protect free speech at the ballot box

When Jillian Ostrewich entered her Houston, Texas, polling place in 2018, she expected the only decisions she’d face would be on the ballot. Instead, an election judge gave her an ultimatum: turn her shirt inside out or forfeit her vote. Similarly, in 2018, a Dallas-area election judge ordered Tony Ortiz to turn his “MAGA” hat ins ...

Freedom Foundation v. Washington Dept. of Ecology

State agency Scrooge violates Santa’s First Amendment rights

Each year around the holidays, Washington-based Freedom Foundation sends staff members to the lobbies of state agency buildings. These staffers—dressed as Santa—hand out leaflets that explain state employees’ right to opt out of union dues. Allowed by most agencies, the Washington Department of Ecology in 2017 instead prohibited the leafl ...

Rentberry v. City of Seattle

Seattle’s unconstitutional rent-bidding law blocks innovation, free speech

Rentberry is a small San Francisco-based startup that connects landlords and renters through a rent-bidding website. The company hopes to expand its service to Seattle, however city council adopted a one-year moratorium on the service over concerns it might violate existing rental law and might inflate housing costs—despite no evidence that eithe ...

Yim v. City of Seattle

Seattle wages unconstitutional war on landlords

In a noble but misguided effort to combat racial discrimination, the City of Seattle passed a series of ordinances forbidding local landlords from choosing their own tenants. A “first in time” ordinance requires landlords to rent to the first financially-qualified tenant who applies. And the “Fair Chance Housing Ordinance” f ...

Elster v. City of Seattle, Washington

Seattle’s politician enrichment tax forces property owners to subsidize private political speech and violates the First Amendment

Representing Seattle residents and property owners, PLF sued to overturn Seattle’s ordinance mandating public campaign financing. Under the city’s “democracy voucher” program, each Seattle resident receives four $25 vouchers to support eligible candidates for local political office. The money to fund the voucher program is t ...

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March 19, 2019

Rent-bidding websites still banned in Seattle

Seattle loves to sell itself as a tech mecca, until innovation clashes with progressive stereotypes. Then Seattle's arms are not so open, as San Fran tech startup and PLF client Rentberry found out. Rentberry is one of several innovative websites that are trying to revolutionize and simplify the home rental process. Rentberry simplifies and automat ...

February 08, 2019

Time to reacquaint campaign finance with the First Amendment

Today, PLF filed an amicus brief urging the Supreme Court to reconsider the First Amendment's relationship to campaign contributions in a case called Illinois Liberty PAC v. Raoul. The case challenges an Illinois law that imposes contribution limits on all individuals and groups except political parties and their leaders. The case would allow the C ...

December 17, 2018

Seattle “democracy vouchers” head to state supreme court

People use money to express themselves. Resistance T-shirts, MAGA hats, donations to moveon.org, promoted tweets—whatever your views may be, shouting louder than the other guy will cost you. So, what if government takes money from one person to pay for another person's expression? Is that really any different from forcing a Democrat to don a ...

September 28, 2018

Seattle can’t ban criminal background checks

Does a landlord have a constitutional right to ask about someone’s criminal background before renting to them? Today, PLF filed a brief in Yim v. City of Seattle unveiling the (obvious) answer: Yes! Seattle’s “Fair Chance Housing Ordinance” forbids inquiries into a rental applicant’s criminal history. And just in ca ...

August 17, 2018

Seattle can’t ban websites it dislikes

Today, we filed a motion for summary judgment in Rentberry v. City of Seattle, asking a federal court to throw out Seattle's ban on rental bidding websites. We argue that Seattle's regulation by reflex is contrary to the core tenets of a free society. ...

July 10, 2018

Christmas in July

PLF is now Santa's legal counsel. Santa probably fends off a barrage of bogus lawsuits; implied warranty claims from kids disappointed in their toys, property owners filing fraudulent claims over roof damage, Scrooges claiming noise pollution from too much jolly laughter and tinkling bells in the night. This time, though, Santa is the one suing. ...

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