Jeffrey W. McCoy

Attorney

Jeff McCoy is an attorney at Pacific Legal Foundation, where he represents Americans fighting back against excessive and unlawful government regulations. 

Jeff joined PLF in 2017. Since then, he has focused his litigation on separation of powers and private property rights. Jeff also leads PLF’s coastal land rights initiative, which seeks to strengthen and defend statutory and constitutional protections for coastal property owners across the country.  

Throughout his career, Jeff has worked for various organizations that promote individual liberty and limited government. Prior to joining PLF, Jeff was a staff attorney at Mountain States Legal Foundation in Lakewood, Colorado, for five years. His work at Mountain States included helping secure victory for a Wyoming private property owner in U.S. Supreme Court case Marvin M. Brandt Revocable Trust v. United States. Besides Mountain States, Jeff worked as an intern for the Cato Institute during the spring of 2008, and after his first year of law school, he worked as a Charles G. Koch Summer Fellow at the Institute for Justice’s Seattle office.  

Jeff received his B.A. degree in political science and philosophy from the University of Colorado in 2007 and his law degree, also from the University of Colorado, in 2011. During his time at law school, Jeff had the honor of working as a judicial extern for then-Judge Neil Gorsuch at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit.  

Despite working on coastal land rights, Jeff lives in the land-locked state of Colorado with his wife and two kids. If he is not at his house or working, you can find him hiking or attending a game involving one of Colorado’s many sports teams. 

Sheffield v. George P. Bush, GLO Commissioner

Texas moves the public beach onto private, residential properties

Charles Sheffield is a long-time Texan and surfer who bought beachfront homes in Surfside Beach as a retirement investment. Merry Porter is a native Texan and resident of Surfside Beach who owns and uses a small beachfront home for rental income. In March 2021, without prior notice or compensation, the Texas General Land Office moved the public bea ...

Foster v. U.S. Department of Agriculture

Farming family fights government’s unconstitutional restrictions on their livelihood

Arlen and Cindy Foster are third-generation farmers in Miner County, South Dakota. They have a long history of responsible land conservation, including the tree line Arlen’s father planted to prevent erosion. In the winter, deep snow drifts pile in the tree belt and come spring, the melting snow collects in a farm field. A federal agency rule ...

Skipper v. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Illegal critical habitat designation punishes family’s voluntary conservation efforts

The Skipper family has owned forestland in Clarke County, Alabama, since 1902, which it manages for timber production and conservation. In 1956 they established the Scotch Wildlife Management Area (WMA), agreeing to voluntarily open their land for the state’s wildlife conservation efforts and outdoor recreation. In February 2020, the U.S. Fis ...

cement building Adamski v. California Coastal Commission

Builders battle the California Coastal Commission’s basement ban

When Chris Adamski, a Monterey County, California contractor, and his longtime mentor and friend Mike Pietro bought four properties in the county’s Carmel Point neighborhood in 2014, they planned to develop two houses to sell, and then build one house for each of them—Chris for his large family, and Mike for retirement. The California Coast ...

United States v. LaPant

Bureaucrats can’t rewrite the law just because they don’t like it

Jack LaPant thought that he had properly navigated all the necessary regulations under the federal Clean Water Act when he plowed his northern California farmland in 2011 to grow wheat. Multiple agencies said he did not need a permit; but in 2016, government bureaucrats sued Jack for not obtaining a permit, even though the Clean Water Act doesnR ...

Northern New Mexico Stockman’s Association v. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Ranchers fight illegal critical habitat designation

In 2016, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service designated as critical habitat some 14,000 acres of land and 170 miles of streams in Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico for the jumping mouse. The designation severely limits ranchers’ access to grazing land and watering spots and, according to the Fish and Wildlife Service, adds $20 million in regul ...

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April 19, 2021

The Hill: Congress and the administration cannot play games with the Congressional Review Act

On March 19, Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-Md.) sent a letter to the Office of Management and Budget acting director, requesting that the OMB freeze and repeal any previous administration regulations that were not sent to Congress as required by the Congressional Review Act (CRA). While Congress and the president have the authority to roll back ...

December 07, 2020

Daily Journal: Supreme Court should clarify that agencies cannot break the law without consequence

This week, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral argument in Collins v. Mnuchin. The case involves Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac shareholders' challenge to regulations by the Federal Housing Finance Agency. But while the case involves housing finance regulation, the consequences could extend to nearly every lawsuit against a government agency. In 2008 ...

December 01, 2020

Frozen land isn’t navigable water (despite what the Clean Water Act says)

Richard Schok owns a pipe fabricating company in North Pole, Alaska. After decades of building a successful business, Richard decided to purchase property to relocate and expand his company. The new property was next to a junk car dealer, a scrap metal dealer, and a concrete product supply company. Not exactly the pristine wetlands one ...

September 09, 2020

The Center Square: To boost affordable housing, Boulder should end regulations that drive up costs

Rent and housing prices in Boulder are punishingly high: last year, the average rent for a one-bedroom apartment was $1,823 per month, making it one of the most expensive markets in the country. Not surprisingly, many residents are searching for ways to make housing more affordable. Prices are high because there's not enough supply — ...

April 13, 2020

The Hill: A government agency cannot change the terms of Congress’s COVID-19 relief bill

Last week, the federal government launched the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), a new loan program intended to help small businesses that have partially or fully shut down because of the COVID-19 pandemic. The program's initial roll-out didn't go well; many banks delayed or refused to accept loan applications. But fixing these issues does nothing ...

October 21, 2019

Congress, not presidential proclamation, should establish national parks

This summer, the National Park Service (NPS) celebrated its 103rd anniversary. The NPS, the leading agency responsible for maintaining national parks and monuments, remains popular among the general public. Yet, the reservation of public lands is not without controversy, especially when it comes to national monuments. One key difference between nat ...

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