Jeffrey W. McCoy

Attorney

Sacramento

Jeff McCoy is an attorney at PLF’s office in Sacramento, where he works on cases involving environmental regulations and private property rights. Prior to joining PLF, Jeff was a staff attorney at Mountain States Legal Foundation in Lakewood, Colorado for five years. During his time at Mountain States he litigated cases protecting individual liberty, the right to own and use property, limited and ethical government, and the free enterprise system. His work included helping secure victory for a Wyoming private property owner in United States Supreme Court case Marvin M. Brandt Revocable Trust v. United States.

Throughout his career, Jeff has worked for various organizations that promote individual liberty and limited government. Besides Mountain States, Jeff worked as an intern for the Cato Institute during the spring of 2008 and, after his first year of law school, Jeff worked as a Charles G. Koch fellow at the Institute for Justice’s Seattle office. In 2017, Jeff returned to his state of birth to join PLF and continue his work helping people fight against government overreach.

Jeff received his Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and Philosophy from the University of Colorado in 2007 and his law degree, also from the University of Colorado, in 2011. During his time at law school, Jeff had the honor of working as a judicial extern for then-Judge Neil Gorsuch at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit. Jeff is licensed to practice in California, Colorado, the U.S. District Court for the District of Colorado, and at the U.S. Courts of Appeals for the Ninth and Tenth Circuits.

Jeff McCoy is an attorney at PLF’s office in Sacramento, where he works on cases involving environmental regulations and private property rights. Prior to joining PLF, Jeff was a staff attorney at Mountain States Legal Foundation in Lakewood, Colorado for five years. During his time at Mountain States he litigated cases protecting individual liberty, the right to own and use property, limited and ethical government, and the free enterprise system. His work included helping secure victory for a Wyoming private property owner in United States Supreme Court case Marvin M. Brandt Revocable Trust v. United States.

Throughout his career, Jeff has worked for various organizations that promote individual liberty and limited government. Besides Mountain States, Jeff worked as an intern for the Cato Institute during the spring of 2008 and, after his first year of law school, Jeff worked as a Charles G. Koch fellow at the Institute for Justice’s Seattle office. In 2017, Jeff returned to his state of birth to join PLF and continue his work helping people fight against government overreach.

Jeff received his Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and Philosophy from the University of Colorado in 2007 and his law degree, also from the University of Colorado, in 2011. During his time at law school, Jeff had the honor of working as a judicial extern for then-Judge Neil Gorsuch at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit. Jeff is licensed to practice in California, Colorado, the U.S. District Court for the District of Colorado, and at the U.S. Courts of Appeals for the Ninth and Tenth Circuits.

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Procedural Guarantees

Northern New Mexico Stockman’s Association v. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Ranchers fight illegal critical habitat designation

In 2016, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service designated as critical habitat some 14,000 acres of land and 170 miles of streams in Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico for the jumping mouse. The designation severely limits ranchers’ access to grazing land and watering spots and, according to the Fish and Wildlife Service, adds $20 million in regulatory costs, threatening livelihoods that go back generations. Because the Fish and Wildlife Service did not conduct a full economic analysis prior to the critical habitat designation as required by law, the Northern New Mexico Stockman’s Association and Otero County Cattlemen’s Association filed a federal lawsuit challenging the designation.

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Property Rights

Pakdel v. City and County of San Francisco

Government can’t force tenants for life

Mr. Pakdel is a small business owner in Ohio. In 2009 he bought what’s known as a “tenancy in common” (TIC) apartment in San Francisco and leased it to a residential tenant. As part of the purchase, Pakdel signed an agreement with the other owners to convert the building’s six units into condominiums. But the City of San Francisco requires that property owners doing this conversion must offer lifetime leases to any tenants. Rather than allow the city to trample his property rights by dictating the use of his own property, Pakdel is fighting the unconstitutional mandate in federal court.

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Property Rights

Kansas Natural Resource Coalition v. Department of Interior

Bad rulemaking threatens good conservation

A buffalo rancher by trade, Ken Klemm also uses his 4,000-acre ranch in Kansas for conservation efforts. In fact, Klemm works with the Kansas Natural Resource Coalition (KNRC) to implement a conservation plan for the lesser prairie chicken. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service considers such local collaboration for determining endangered listings under its 2003 rule called the Policy for Evaluating Conservation Efforts When Making Listing Decisions (PECE Rule). Unfortunately, the rule is not lawfully in effect because the Service never submitted the PECE Rule to Congress as required by the Congressional Review Act (CRA). On behalf of KNRC, PLF has filed a lawsuit demanding that the Service submit its rule to Congress so it can legally take effect and allow good conservation work to continue.

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By Jeffrey W. McCoy

It’s time to restrain federal agencies’ power grabs

PLF filed a fresh lawsuit today on the heels of our latest Supreme Court victory. Last week, in Weyerhaeuser v. United States Fish and Wildlife Service, a unanimous Supreme Court … ›

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By Jeffrey W. McCoy

The Forest Service pulled a bait-and-switch on a decades-old land deal. Here’s how the owners are fighting back.

When the government negotiates for a limited-access easement across your property, it cannot turn around later and decide it has an unlimited right to cross your property. Wil Wilkins and … ›

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By Jeffrey W. McCoy

Agencies must explain their decisions

Today, we filed the latest brief in Mark and Bella Greene’s ongoing litigation against the California Coastal Commission. The Greenes are a retired couple who wish to remodel their house … ›

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By Jeffrey W. McCoy

The Constitution protects property rights from unelected government agencies

In 1996, Dr. Mark and Bella Greene, a couple from Pennsylvania, bought an older beach house in Playa Del Rey, Los Angeles. Their plan is to remodel this home and … ›

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By Jeffrey W. McCoy

One unelected bureaucrat should not have unilateral authority over the use of 640 million acres of public land

Today, PLF filed a brief on behalf of Gregory Yount, a self-employed prospector and miner, that asks the Supreme Court to hear two cases involving the use of federal public … ›

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By Jeffrey W. McCoy

Corps cannot treat permafrost as navigable waters

Today, PLF filed an opening brief in the Ninth Circuit in Tin Cup, LLC v. Army Corps of Engineers. The case is brought by a small, family-owned pipe fabrication company … ›

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