Jeffrey W. McCoy

Attorney Sacramento

Jeff McCoy is an attorney at PLF’s office in Sacramento, where he works on cases involving environmental regulations and private property rights. Prior to joining PLF, Jeff was a staff attorney at Mountain States Legal Foundation in Lakewood, Colorado for five years. During his time at Mountain States he litigated cases protecting individual liberty, the right to own and use property, limited and ethical government, and the free enterprise system. His work included helping secure victory for a Wyoming private property owner in United States Supreme Court case Marvin M. Brandt Revocable Trust v. United States.

Throughout his career, Jeff has worked for various organizations that promote individual liberty and limited government. Besides Mountain States, Jeff worked as an intern for the Cato Institute during the spring of 2008 and, after his first year of law school, Jeff worked as a Charles G. Koch fellow at the Institute for Justice’s Seattle office. In 2017, Jeff returned to his state of birth to join PLF and continue his work helping people fight against government overreach.

Jeff received his Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and Philosophy from the University of Colorado in 2007 and his law degree, also from the University of Colorado, in 2011. During his time at law school, Jeff had the honor of working as a judicial extern for then-Judge Neil Gorsuch at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit. Jeff is licensed to practice in California, Colorado, the U.S. District Court for the District of Colorado, and at the U.S. Courts of Appeals for the Ninth and Tenth Circuits.

Northern New Mexico Stockman’s Association v. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Ranchers fight illegal critical habitat designation

In 2016, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service designated as critical habitat some 14,000 acres of land and 170 miles of streams in Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico for the jumping mouse. The designation severely limits ranchers’ access to grazing land and watering spots and, according to the Fish and Wildlife Service, adds $20 million in regul ...

Pakdel v. City and County of San Francisco

Government can’t force tenants for life

Mr. Pakdel is a small business owner in Ohio. In 2009 he bought what’s known as a “tenancy in common” (TIC) apartment in San Francisco and leased it to a residential tenant. As part of the purchase, Pakdel signed an agreement with the other owners to convert the building’s six units into condominiums. But the City of San Fra ...

Kansas Natural Resource Coalition v. Department of Interior

Bad rulemaking threatens good conservation

A buffalo rancher by trade, Ken Klemm also uses his 4,000-acre ranch in Kansas for conservation efforts. In fact, Klemm works with the Kansas Natural Resource Coalition (KNRC) to implement a conservation plan for the lesser prairie chicken. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service considers such local collaboration for determining endangered listings und ...

Bears Ears National Monument Litigation

Defending public lands access for all

In December 2016, under cover of the Antiquities Act, President Obama unilaterally created the 1.35 million acre Bears Ears National Monument. One year later, President Trump slashed the size of the monument by 85 percent—to around 200,000 acres, freeing up more than one million acres for public use. Outerwear retailer Patagonia, environmental gr ...

Santa Barbara Association of Realtors v. City of Santa Barbara and Santa Barbara City Council

Santa Barbara Violates Fourth Amendment Rights of Property Owners

Under an impermissibly vague Santa Barbara ordinance, home owners wishing to sell their residential property are required to allow the city to enter and conduct unconstitutional warrantless searches prior to sale. Failure to comply with this unconstitutional condition exposes the home owner to possible criminal and civil penalties. The Fourth Amend ...

Cherk Family Trust v. County of Marin, California

Marin County punishes elderly property owners with unconstitutional fees

When Dart and Esther Cherk needed to supplement their retirement income, they decided to split a three-acre vacant lot in Marin County that had been in the family for six decades in order to sell both halves. As a condition of the lot split, however, the county demanded that they pay $40,000 as an “affordable housing” fee. … ...

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June 13, 2019

Bears Ears National Monument is the wrong way to conserve our landmarks

Summer's arrival is a godsend for the many victims of winter doldrums. And for calendar enthusiasts, June is officially "Great Outdoors Month." There's no better time to get outside and enjoy our natural world. But what is government's role in protecting those beautiful tracts of nature that so many of us will be enjoying this ...

February 26, 2019

Wisconsin’s bad deal with Foxconn is a lesson for other states

This originally appeared in The Hill on February 25, 2019. Two years ago, Taiwanese tech company Foxconn promised to construct a $10 billion factory and create up to 13,000 jobs in the southeast portion of the Wisconsin. Last month, however, the company announced it was altering its plans for the factory. Although the company still ...

February 12, 2019

The Hill: Here’s why De Blasio’s wrongheaded tenant protection proposal is dead on arrival

This article was originally published by The Hill on February 12th, 2019. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has a new proposal that would threaten landlords he believes are pushing tenants out of their homes. In addition to fines and penalties, De Blasio recently announced that the city ultimately may "seize their buildings" and ...

December 31, 2018

If frozen ground is ‘navigable water,’ Supreme Court should set bureaucrats straight

Originally published by The Hill, December 31, 2018. Richard Schok runs a family pipe fabrication business in North Pole, Alaska, and he wants to move his expanding business to another area in town. What started out as a simple permitting matter turned into a federal case — that is, a case of federal agencies ignoring ...

December 19, 2018

Unelected bureaucrats must follow the law, too

Originally published by The Hill, December 19, 2018. One of the first things Americans learn in civics class is that Congress makes laws and the executive branch enforces those laws. Unfortunately, that key constitutional principle has been eroded, with regulatory agencies ignoring congressional commands and instead making their own laws through ad ...

December 18, 2018

Is frozen ground a ‘navigable water’? PLF asks Supreme Court to decide

Is permafrost—ground that remains continuously frozen for years on end—a "navigable water"? That's what government regulators who enforce the Clean Water Act want us to believe. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) believes that permanently frozen ground can be regulated as a "wetland." To most people, that probably sounds like a stretch. ...

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