Jeffrey W. McCoy

Attorney Sacramento

Jeff McCoy is an attorney at PLF’s office in Sacramento, where he works on cases involving environmental regulations and private property rights. Prior to joining PLF, Jeff was a staff attorney at Mountain States Legal Foundation in Lakewood, Colorado for five years. During his time at Mountain States he litigated cases protecting individual liberty, the right to own and use property, limited and ethical government, and the free enterprise system. His work included helping secure victory for a Wyoming private property owner in United States Supreme Court case Marvin M. Brandt Revocable Trust v. United States.

Throughout his career, Jeff has worked for various organizations that promote individual liberty and limited government. Besides Mountain States, Jeff worked as an intern for the Cato Institute during the spring of 2008 and, after his first year of law school, Jeff worked as a Charles G. Koch fellow at the Institute for Justice’s Seattle office. In 2017, Jeff returned to his state of birth to join PLF and continue his work helping people fight against government overreach.

Jeff received his Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and Philosophy from the University of Colorado in 2007 and his law degree, also from the University of Colorado, in 2011. During his time at law school, Jeff had the honor of working as a judicial extern for then-Judge Neil Gorsuch at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit. Jeff is licensed to practice in California, Colorado, the U.S. District Court for the District of Colorado, and at the U.S. Courts of Appeals for the Ninth and Tenth Circuits.

United States v. LaPant

Bureaucrats can’t rewrite the law just because they don’t like it

Jack LaPant thought that he had properly navigated all the necessary regulations under the federal Clean Water Act when he plowed his northern California farmland in 2011 to grow wheat. Multiple agencies said he did not need a permit; but in 2016, government bureaucrats sued Jack for not obtaining a permit, even though the Clean Water Act doesnR ...

Northern New Mexico Stockman’s Association v. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Ranchers fight illegal critical habitat designation

In 2016, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service designated as critical habitat some 14,000 acres of land and 170 miles of streams in Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico for the jumping mouse. The designation severely limits ranchers’ access to grazing land and watering spots and, according to the Fish and Wildlife Service, adds $20 million in regul ...

Wilkins v. United States of America

Government bait-and-switch tramples on property rights and peace of mind

Wil Wilkins and Jane Stanton live next to Montana’s Bitterroot National Forest. A road that crosses both of their properties is the result of a limited-use easement granted to the U.S. Forest Service by the properties’ previous owners in 1962. The general public is not supposed to use the road, but in 2006 the Forest Service began adver ...

Pakdel v. City and County of San Francisco

Government can’t force tenants for life

Mr. Pakdel is a small business owner in Ohio. In 2009 he bought what’s known as a “tenancy in common” (TIC) apartment in San Francisco and leased it to a residential tenant. As part of the purchase, Pakdel signed an agreement with the other owners to convert the building’s six units into condominiums. But the City of San Fra ...

Kansas Natural Resource Coalition v. Department of Interior

Bad rulemaking threatens good conservation

A buffalo rancher by trade, Ken Klemm also uses his 4,000-acre ranch in Kansas for conservation efforts. In fact, Klemm works with the Kansas Natural Resource Coalition (KNRC) to implement a conservation plan for the lesser prairie chicken. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service considers such local collaboration for determining endangered listings und ...

Bears Ears National Monument Litigation

Defending public lands access for all

In December 2016, under cover of the Antiquities Act, President Obama unilaterally created the 1.35 million acre Bears Ears National Monument. One year later, President Trump slashed the size of the monument by 85 percent—to around 200,000 acres, freeing up more than one million acres for public use. Outerwear retailer Patagonia, environmental gr ...

Latest Posts

See All Posts
April 13, 2020

The Hill: A government agency cannot change the terms of Congress’s COVID-19 relief bill

Last week, the federal government launched the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), a new loan program intended to help small businesses that have partially or fully shut down because of the COVID-19 pandemic. The program's initial roll-out didn't go well; many banks delayed or refused to accept loan applications. But fixing these issues does nothing ...

October 21, 2019

Congress, not presidential proclamation, should establish national parks

This summer, the National Park Service (NPS) celebrated its 103rd anniversary. The NPS, the leading agency responsible for maintaining national parks and monuments, remains popular among the general public. Yet, the reservation of public lands is not without controversy, especially when it comes to national monuments. One key difference between nat ...

July 23, 2019

How quickly does legal precedent take effect?

To understand how quickly a Supreme Court decision can have widespread effects in the legal system, take a closer look at the Court's decision in Knick v. Township of Scott. That decision, Pacific Legal Foundation's 12th Supreme Court victory, is already reshaping property rights cases nationwide. Last month, the U.S. Supreme Court sided with PLF ...

July 10, 2019

Vindication for Joe: Ninth Circuit vacates late Montanan’s Clean Water Act conviction

Today, the Ninth Circuit vindicated Joe Robertson. Joe, a late Navy veteran was sentenced to 18 months in prison for allegedly violating the Clean Water Act. The Ninth Circuit vacated Joe's criminal conviction after a Supreme Court order in April of this year granted, vacated, and remanded Mr. Robertson's case. In 2015, the federal government ...

June 13, 2019

Bears Ears National Monument is the wrong way to conserve our landmarks

Summer's arrival is a godsend for the many victims of winter doldrums. And for calendar enthusiasts, June is officially "Great Outdoors Month." There's no better time to get outside and enjoy our natural world. But what is government's role in protecting those beautiful tracts of nature that so many of us will be enjoying this ...

February 26, 2019

Wisconsin’s bad deal with Foxconn is a lesson for other states

This originally appeared in The Hill on February 25, 2019. Two years ago, Taiwanese tech company Foxconn promised to construct a $10 billion factory and create up to 13,000 jobs in the southeast portion of the Wisconsin. Last month, however, the company announced it was altering its plans for the factory. Although the company still ...

Donate