Glenn E. Roper

Attorney Sacramento

Glenn Roper joined Pacific Legal Foundation in 2019. Based in Colorado, he litigates across the country on behalf of individuals and organizations to advance the principles of individual freedom, separation of powers, and the rule of law.

With experience in both private practice and government, Glenn has seen the dangers posed to liberty when agencies, bureaucrats, and politicians ignore individual rights in favor of expediency or advancing a political agenda. His interest in combating those dangers spans PLF’s practice areas, including equal protection, separation of powers, environmental law, property rights, and the First Amendment.

Although he grew up in California’s Central Valley, Glenn has spent most of his career in the Mountain West. Immediately prior to joining PLF, Glenn served as Deputy Solicitor General in Colorado’s Office of the Attorney General, where he handled select appellate and constitutional litigation on behalf of the State and its agencies and officials. Before joining the Attorney General’s Office, Glenn was a partner in a Denver law firm, where he focused on complex civil litigation, e-discovery, and appellate matters. He previously served as Deputy Associate Counsel in the White House Counsel’s Office for President George W. Bush and as a law clerk to Judge David M. Ebel of the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals. Glenn graduated first in his class from Brigham Young University Law School.

When he’s not practicing law, Glenn enjoys reading history or hiking the Colorado mountains with his wife and four children.

Coalition for TJ v. Fairfax County School Board

Fighting Race-Based Discrimination at Nation’s Top-Ranked High School

Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, or TJ, is the nation’s top-ranked public high school. Fairfax County Public Schools’ (FCPS) recent changes to TJ’s admissions process specifically aim to reduce the number of Asian-American children—and only Asian-American children—who can attend TJ. The school district& ...

Hardre et al. v. Markey et al.

Colorado barbershop owner fights for his right to equality before the law

Etienne Hardre was forced to close his barbershop in Colorado Springs, CO, at the start of the pandemic and has operated at reduced capacity since. He worked tirelessly to find relief programs and grants that would allow him to keep his business afloat and provide for the livelihood of his family and employees. In December, the Governor signed legi ...

Lawsuits filed to preserve swordfish industry and livelihoods Abad, et al. v. Bonham, et al. and Williams, et al. v. Ross, et al.

Governments’ misguided battle threatens California fishermen and their way of life.

Swordfish is a very popular seafood and one of the most abundant types of fish on the West Coast. It is also a primary source of income and way of life for many California families. But recent legal changes at the state and federal levels threaten to wipe out longtime family-owned businesses as well as the entire domestic swordfish supply. The new ...

Adobe Stock Zito v. North Carolina Coastal Resource Commission; Town of Nags Head

Fighting government’s blurred lines on property rights

All Michael and Cathy Zito wanted to do was rebuild their vacation cottage in Nags Head, North Carolina after fire destroyed it in 2016. But state and local governments denied building permits because the property is now within a no-build zone. The Zitos are left with the only vacant lot in a line of beach homes and can do little more than pitch a ...

Preserve Responsible Shoreline Management (PRSM) v. City of Bainbridge Island; Olympic Stewardship Foundation (OSF) v. Growth Management Hearings Board

Coastal property rights run aground in Washington State

Coastal counties in Washington State passed “critical areas” ordinances requiring all shoreline property owners to dedicate a “buffer” zone and a strip of their beach property to the public as a mandatory condition on any new development. The counties assert this purported power under the state’s Shoreline Management A ...

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November 30, 2020

Blue-collar fishermen deserve to make a living

Austen Brown started fishing commercially with his father off California's coast when he was only 8 years old. By the time he was 13, Austen was making his own living as a fisherman, and he has spent the past few decades fishing for everything from codfish to shark. But perhaps his favorite target is the ...

November 02, 2020

The Hill: Courts should interpret unclear laws in favor of freedom, not bureaucratic preference

A federal appeals court in Denver is considering a controversial question: Does a "bump stock" — a firearm add-on that allows bullets to be fired in rapid succession — turn an ordinary rifle into an illegal machine gun? In 2018, the federal agency that regulates firearms concluded that it does. A Utah gun lobbyist sued ...

July 20, 2020

Governments should uphold separation of powers during COVID-19

As America begins to open up from the COVID-19 pandemic, various state and local stay-at-home orders, and the lifting of those orders, have been subject to legal challenges. Many of these lawsuits claim that government action violates the "separation of powers." Yet there is confusion as to what that term means and how it impacts ...

October 23, 2019

NYC Education Chancellor Carranza’s policies of racial discrimination are causing growing concern

New York City’s education chancellor Richard Carranza recently suggested the city’s “Gifted and Talented Programs” for students be changed or scrapped because of supposed racial inequality. This summer, PLF wrote about the multiple discrimination controversies surrounding Carranza’s tenure as education chancellor. ~~~ ...

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