Jim Manley

Attorney

Jim Manley is an attorney at Pacific Legal Foundation, where he litigates in defense of free speech, economic liberty, and property rights. For more than a decade, he has been fighting to protect and expand freedom through strategic litigation and policymaking.

Before joining PLF, Jim litigated at the Goldwater Institute and Mountain States Legal Foundation. In his first case after graduating from law school, he sued his alma mater and won at the Colorado Supreme Court, guaranteeing the right of self-defense on college campuses. Since then, he has successfully challenged many unconstitutional laws—including striking down part of the Kentucky Constitution—saved a man from jail for the “crime” of repairing windshields, prevented a foster child from being ripped away from her pre-adoptive parents because of her race, and helped enact laws protecting free speech on college campuses. His cases defending free speech, the right to keep and bear arms, taxpayer rights, and property rights have set important precedents for liberty in state and federal courts across the country.

A native of Michigan, he graduated from Arizona State University, with a double major in Political Science and Journalism. He earned his J.D. from the University of Colorado Law School, where he was an Associate Editor of the Law Review and President of the Federalist Society. Before attending law school, he was a professional ski instructor in Telluride, Colorado. He is licensed to practice law in Arizona and Colorado.

Jim lives in Phoenix with his wife, Marlene, and their children, Milton and Cora. They have a dog named Dolley Madison and a cat named Martha Washington.

American Society of Journalists and Authors v. Becerra

California’s freelancer law destroys journalists’ freedom, autonomy

In an effort to regulate the employment status of independent contractors, California passed a law forcing companies in the state to reclassify most freelancers as employees. Under AB 5, freelance journalists and photographers must cap their submissions at 35 per year, per publisher. Anything greater, and they become employees, losing their profess ...

Debbie Pulley v. Janice Izlar, President of the Georgia Board of Nursing

Georgia midwife sues to continue speaking truthfully about her profession

Debbie Pulley has been a Certified Professional Midwife in Georgia for 24 years, both working as a midwife and advocating for midwives. The state’s rules changed in 2015, allowing only licensed nurses to practice midwifery in Georgia. So Debbie turned her efforts to reforming Georgia’s laws and advocating for access to midwifery care. B ...

Kotler v. Webb

California’s next frontier as speech police: your license plate

Jon Kotler is a First Amendment professor at the University of Southern California (USC). He is also a huge fan of the London-based Fulham Football Club and a longtime season ticket holder. Wishing to celebrate the team’s recent success, Jon applied for a personalized license plate with the letters “COYW,” which stands for “ ...

Peter Stavrianoudakis, et al., v. United States Department of Fish & Wildlife and California Department of Fish & Wildlife

Falconry regulations run afoul of the Bill of Rights

Peter Stavrianoudakis is a longtime licensed falconer in California who just wants to do what people have been doing for thousands of years—raise and train falcons. But state and federal regulations have become so restrictive, he and fellow falconers around the country are left to choose between their falcons or their constitutional rights. Pacif ...

Wilkins v. United States of America

Government bait-and-switch tramples on property rights and peace of mind

Wil Wilkins and Jane Stanton live next to Montana’s Bitterroot National Forest. A road that crosses both of their properties is the result of a limited-use easement granted to the U.S. Forest Service by the properties’ previous owners in 1962. The general public is not supposed to use the road, but in 2006 the Forest Service began adver ...

Rentberry v. City of Seattle

Seattle’s unconstitutional rent-bidding law blocks innovation, free speech

Rentberry is a small San Francisco-based startup that connects landlords and renters through a rent-bidding website. The company hopes to expand its service to Seattle, however city council adopted a one-year moratorium on the service over concerns it might violate existing rental law and might inflate housing costs—despite no evidence that eithe ...

Latest Posts

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February 19, 2020

How local governments are stealing Arizonans’ home equity

This article was co-authored by Daniel Dew, legal policy director for Pacific Legal Foundation. Jim Manley lives with his family in Phoenix, where he litigates in defense of individual liberty for PLF. Can the government seize your home over an $8 property tax miscalculation and leave you with nothing? In Arizona, and a shrinking number ...

December 23, 2019

The Hill: California law unjustly and unconstitutionally restricts freelance journalists

Freelancing is a centuries-old practice. But with a controversial state law set to take effect Jan. 1, 2020, freelance journalism soon may become a thing of the past in California. Assembly Bill No. 5 (AB5) was enacted in 2019 to create a new three-part test under California law for determining whether someone is an independent ...

December 16, 2019

The Hill: Call the midwife — but not if you live in Georgia

Debbie Pulley is a midwife, but if she told you that, the Georgia Board of Nursing would fine her $500. That's because the board has barred the use of the title "midwife" by anyone who doesn't hold a nursing license — even people like Pulley, who has spent the past 40 years delivering more than ...

June 14, 2019

Why flag burning and the First Amendment come to mind on Flag Day

Today is Flag Day, which marks 242 years since the United States adopted the Stars and Stripes as our nation's official flag—and next week marks 30 years since the U.S. Supreme Court protected the right to burn that flag. Three decades after the court's decision, it remains controversial. For example, shortly after his election, President-elect ...

November 26, 2018

How Unnecessary Laws Pit Falconry Against Free Speech

Originally published by The Daily Signal on November 26, 2018. When flocks of birds fly too close to airports, hotels, or landfills, property managers call someone like professional falconer Scott Timmons. Timmons launches one of his falcons to patrol the property, where the majestic creature swoops and dives, scaring away seagulls, pigeons, and th ...

November 02, 2018

Is this picture of a falcon illegal?

Picture America. Idyllic images of amber waves of grain, purple mountain majesties, or ancient desert canyons fill the mind. Above whatever landscape the word "America" calls to your mind, an eagle probably soars through the sky. Ironically, that image of freedom evoked by a bird of prey gliding through the sky is actually tightly controlled ...

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