Parker Noland v. MT Public Service Commission

Aspiring junk hauling entrepreneur fights crony “competitor’s veto” law

When Parker Noland graduated from high school in Kalispell, Montana, he and his close friends joined the Army. Parker was medically discharged a few months after basic training and returned home to Kalispell, where he set out to become a debris-hauling entrepreneur. With an eye toward construction sites and a business plan in hand, he ...

Yim v. City of Seattle (II)

Seattle wages unconstitutional war on landlords

In a misguided effort to combat racial disparities in housing, the City of Seattle passed the "Fair Chance Housing Ordinance," which forbids housing providers from considering applicants' criminal histories, usually uncovered in a standard background check. PLF represents several small-scale housing providers who are denied their constitutionally g ...

Art and Antique Dealers League of America v. Seggos

Antique dealers fight for right to display what they’re allowed to sell

Manhattan's antique district is filled with galleries where customers can physically inspect valuable antiques before buying them. But shops cannot display all the merchandise they are allowed to sell. Federal law allows sales of antiques containing ivory that are at least 100 years old, but if antiques contain more than 20% ivory, state law bans t ...

The Clementine Co. v. Adams

New York City’s unequal COVID restrictions silence theaters

New York City actress and theater manager Catherine Russell began her starring role in Perfect Crime in 1987. Over that time, she missed only four days—to attend family weddings—a record-setting run of more than 12,000 performances that lasted until March 2020 when the pandemic was declared. At that point, Catherine implemented extensive COVID ...

Kissel v. Seagull

Fighting unconstitutional burdens on free speech in fundraising

Adam Kissel looked forward to lending his longtime experience in the liberty movement and higher education to help raise money for the nonprofit Jack Miller Center's civic education program. But he soon discovered several states have overly burdensome registration and reporting requirements for paid solicitors. Connecticut, in particular, required ...

American Society of Journalists and Authors v. Bonta

California’s freelancer law destroys journalists’ freedom, autonomy

In an effort to regulate the employment status of independent contractors, California passed a law forcing companies in the state to reclassify most freelancers as employees. Under AB 5, freelance journalists and photographers must cap their submissions at 35 per year, per publisher. Anything greater, and they become employees, losing their profess ...

PulleyCasePagePhoto
Debbie Pulley v. Janice Izlar, President of the Georgia Board of Nursing

Georgia midwife sues to continue speaking truthfully about her profession

Debbie Pulley has been a Certified Professional Midwife in Georgia for 24 years, both working as a midwife and advocating for midwives. The state's rules changed in 2015, allowing only licensed nurses to practice midwifery in Georgia. So Debbie turned her efforts to reforming Georgia's laws and advocating for access to midwifery care. But in 2019, ...

Kotler Case
Kotler v. Webb

California’s next frontier as speech police: your license plate

Jon Kotler is a First Amendment professor at the University of Southern California (USC). He is also a huge fan of the London-based Fulham Football Club and a longtime season ticket holder. Wishing to celebrate the team's recent success, Jon applied for a personalized license plate with the letters "COYW," which stands for "Come on You Whites," the ...

Property Rights
Peter Stavrianoudakis, et al., v. United States Department of Fish & Wildlife and California Department of Fish & Wildlife

Falconry regulations run afoul of the Bill of Rights

Peter Stavrianoudakis is a longtime licensed falconer in California who just wants to do what people have been doing for thousands of years—raise and train falcons. But state and federal regulations have become so restrictive, he and fellow falconers around the country are left to choose between their falcons or their constitutional rights. Pacif ...