Weekly litigation report — October 20, 2018

PLF to National Park Service: Keep the National Mall Open to All Kinds of Speech The National Mall and Memorial Parks are “the premier national civic space for public gatherings … ›

When speech is a nuisance

Yesterday, the Supreme Court denied certiorari in Conagra v. State of California, a California state court decision holding that that three companies that lawfully sold lead paint are liable for … ›

Weekly litigation update — October 6, 2018

A shy frog becomes the center of attention at the Supreme Court This week the Supreme Court of the United States heard oral argument in our Endangered Species Act case … ›

Seattle can’t ban criminal background checks

Does a landlord have a constitutional right to ask about someone’s criminal background before renting to them? Today, PLF filed a brief in Yim v. City of Seattle unveiling the (obvious) answer: Yes! … ›

Weekly litigation update — September 15, 2018

Preliminary injunction briefing completed in Minnesota dance case This week we finished briefing our motion for a preliminary injunction in D.M. v. Minnesota State High School League. In this case, … ›

Weekly litigation report — September 1, 2018

It’s time to finally settle the legislative exactions question Earlier this week, PLF attorneys filed this reply brief in support of the U.S. Supreme Court petition in Dabbs v. Anne … ›

Courts must look behind California’s pretenses when the state channels money to union advocacy

In the aftermath of Janus v. AFSCME, states have come up with some pretty clever ways to funnel money to unions and union-supported speech.  Today, PLF asked the Ninth Circuit … ›

Seattle can’t ban websites it dislikes

Today, we filed a motion for summary judgment in Rentberry v. City of Seattle, asking a federal court to throw out Seattle’s ban on rental bidding websites. We argue that … ›

Lead paint, public nuisance, and the First Amendment

Prior to 1951, lead paint was lawfully sold and used in the interior of houses. This presented no problem at the time, but, as it ages and deteriorates, and as … ›

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Weekly litigation report — October 20, 2018

PLF to National Park Service: Keep the National Mall Open to All Kinds of Speech The National Mall and Memorial Parks are “the premier national civic space for public gatherings … ›

When speech is a nuisance

Yesterday, the Supreme Court denied certiorari in Conagra v. State of California, a California state court decision holding that that three companies that lawfully sold lead paint are liable for … ›

Weekly litigation update — October 6, 2018

A shy frog becomes the center of attention at the Supreme Court This week the Supreme Court of the United States heard oral argument in our Endangered Species Act case … ›

Seattle can’t ban criminal background checks

Does a landlord have a constitutional right to ask about someone’s criminal background before renting to them? Today, PLF filed a brief in Yim v. City of Seattle unveiling the (obvious) answer: Yes! … ›

Weekly litigation update — September 15, 2018

Preliminary injunction briefing completed in Minnesota dance case This week we finished briefing our motion for a preliminary injunction in D.M. v. Minnesota State High School League. In this case, … ›

Weekly litigation report — September 1, 2018

It’s time to finally settle the legislative exactions question Earlier this week, PLF attorneys filed this reply brief in support of the U.S. Supreme Court petition in Dabbs v. Anne … ›

Courts must look behind California’s pretenses when the state channels money to union advocacy

In the aftermath of Janus v. AFSCME, states have come up with some pretty clever ways to funnel money to unions and union-supported speech.  Today, PLF asked the Ninth Circuit … ›

Seattle can’t ban websites it dislikes

Today, we filed a motion for summary judgment in Rentberry v. City of Seattle, asking a federal court to throw out Seattle’s ban on rental bidding websites. We argue that … ›

Lead paint, public nuisance, and the First Amendment

Prior to 1951, lead paint was lawfully sold and used in the interior of houses. This presented no problem at the time, but, as it ages and deteriorates, and as … ›

The Morning Docket

Stay up to date with the Morning Docket, a weekly highlight of PLF's best articles, videos, and podcasts.

Weekly litigation report — October 20, 2018

PLF to National Park Service: Keep the National Mall Open to All Kinds of Speech The National Mall and Memorial Parks are “the premier national civic space for public gatherings … ›

When speech is a nuisance

Yesterday, the Supreme Court denied certiorari in Conagra v. State of California, a California state court decision holding that that three companies that lawfully sold lead paint are liable for … ›

Weekly litigation update — October 6, 2018

A shy frog becomes the center of attention at the Supreme Court This week the Supreme Court of the United States heard oral argument in our Endangered Species Act case … ›

Seattle can’t ban criminal background checks

Does a landlord have a constitutional right to ask about someone’s criminal background before renting to them? Today, PLF filed a brief in Yim v. City of Seattle unveiling the (obvious) answer: Yes! … ›

Weekly litigation update — September 15, 2018

Preliminary injunction briefing completed in Minnesota dance case This week we finished briefing our motion for a preliminary injunction in D.M. v. Minnesota State High School League. In this case, … ›

Weekly litigation report — September 1, 2018

It’s time to finally settle the legislative exactions question Earlier this week, PLF attorneys filed this reply brief in support of the U.S. Supreme Court petition in Dabbs v. Anne … ›

Courts must look behind California’s pretenses when the state channels money to union advocacy

In the aftermath of Janus v. AFSCME, states have come up with some pretty clever ways to funnel money to unions and union-supported speech.  Today, PLF asked the Ninth Circuit … ›

Seattle can’t ban websites it dislikes

Today, we filed a motion for summary judgment in Rentberry v. City of Seattle, asking a federal court to throw out Seattle’s ban on rental bidding websites. We argue that … ›

Lead paint, public nuisance, and the First Amendment

Prior to 1951, lead paint was lawfully sold and used in the interior of houses. This presented no problem at the time, but, as it ages and deteriorates, and as … ›

Weekly litigation report — October 20, 2018

PLF to National Park Service: Keep the National Mall Open to All Kinds of Speech The National Mall and Memorial Parks are “the premier national civic space for public gatherings … ›

When speech is a nuisance

Yesterday, the Supreme Court denied certiorari in Conagra v. State of California, a California state court decision holding that that three companies that lawfully sold lead paint are liable for … ›

Weekly litigation update — October 6, 2018

A shy frog becomes the center of attention at the Supreme Court This week the Supreme Court of the United States heard oral argument in our Endangered Species Act case … ›

Seattle can’t ban criminal background checks

Does a landlord have a constitutional right to ask about someone’s criminal background before renting to them? Today, PLF filed a brief in Yim v. City of Seattle unveiling the (obvious) answer: Yes! … ›

Weekly litigation update — September 15, 2018

Preliminary injunction briefing completed in Minnesota dance case This week we finished briefing our motion for a preliminary injunction in D.M. v. Minnesota State High School League. In this case, … ›

Weekly litigation report — September 1, 2018

It’s time to finally settle the legislative exactions question Earlier this week, PLF attorneys filed this reply brief in support of the U.S. Supreme Court petition in Dabbs v. Anne … ›

Courts must look behind California’s pretenses when the state channels money to union advocacy

In the aftermath of Janus v. AFSCME, states have come up with some pretty clever ways to funnel money to unions and union-supported speech.  Today, PLF asked the Ninth Circuit … ›

Seattle can’t ban websites it dislikes

Today, we filed a motion for summary judgment in Rentberry v. City of Seattle, asking a federal court to throw out Seattle’s ban on rental bidding websites. We argue that … ›

Lead paint, public nuisance, and the First Amendment

Prior to 1951, lead paint was lawfully sold and used in the interior of houses. This presented no problem at the time, but, as it ages and deteriorates, and as … ›