Jeremy Talcott

Attorney

Sacramento

Jeremy Talcott joined the Pacific Legal Foundation in 2016. He focuses on property rights, administrative law, and the separation of powers and federalism principles that (ought to) define American government.

Jeremy obtained his undergraduate degree in Communications from the University of Central Florida, but for every minute he spent in classes, he spent five more playing guitar or bass in several noteworthy-for-their-obscurity rock and roll bands. A few tours across the country later, Jeremy realized that he was spending all of his free time reading about the principles of liberty and decided to make a career out of it.

He graduated cum laude from Chapman University, Fowler School of Law in Orange, California, where he was president of the Federalist Society, Senior Articles Editor of the Chapman Law Review, and “that guy who keeps trying to talk about the Constitution” of the Chapman Moot Court team. His two favorite parts of law school were externing for Judge Andrew J. Guilford in the Central District of California and getting the top grade in Administrative Law from his favorite professor.

Jeremy has one extremely funny veterinarian wife, two rambunctious twin boys, three hungry cats, two nervous dogs, and a large pile of unread books, all fighting for his attention. He and his wife are slowly working their way through IMDB’s list of the Top 250 Horror Films of All Time.

Likes: separation of powers, due process

Dislikes: deference, delegation

Desires: long walks in a freer country

Jeremy Talcott joined the Pacific Legal Foundation in 2016. He focuses on property rights, administrative law, and the separation of powers and federalism principles that (ought to) define American government.

Jeremy obtained his undergraduate degree in Communications from the University of Central Florida, but for every minute he spent in classes, he spent five more playing guitar or bass in several noteworthy-for-their-obscurity rock and roll bands. A few tours across the country later, Jeremy realized that he was spending all of his free time reading about the principles of liberty and decided to make a career out of it.

He graduated cum laude from Chapman University, Fowler School of Law in Orange, California, where he was president of the Federalist Society, Senior Articles Editor of the Chapman Law Review, and “that guy who keeps trying to talk about the Constitution” of the Chapman Moot Court team. His two favorite parts of law school were externing for Judge Andrew J. Guilford in the Central District of California and getting the top grade in Administrative Law from his favorite professor.

Jeremy has one extremely funny veterinarian wife, two rambunctious twin boys, three hungry cats, two nervous dogs, and a large pile of unread books, all fighting for his attention. He and his wife are slowly working their way through IMDB’s list of the Top 250 Horror Films of All Time.

Likes: separation of powers, due process

Dislikes: deference, delegation

Desires: long walks in a freer country

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Personal Liberties

Freedom Foundation v. Washington Dept. of Ecology

State agency Scrooge violates Santa’s First Amendment rights

Each year around the holidays, Washington-based Freedom Foundation sends staff members to the lobbies of state agency buildings. These staffers—dressed as Santa—hand out leaflets that explain state employees’ right to opt out of union dues. Allowed by most agencies, the Washington Department of Ecology in 2017 instead prohibited the leafletting. Even worse is that the agency kicked Santa out of its lobby while allowing other organizations to engage in political expression there—including the union itself. Represented by Pacific Legal Foundation, Freedom Foundation is suing the Department of Ecology in federal court for violating the First Amendment.

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Personal Liberties

Robinson v. Wentzell

Race-based quotas in Connecticut schools are unconstitutional and hurt Black and Hispanic students

Hartford, Connecticut, runs a number of world-class magnet schools. Their success has led to the use of a lottery to decide who can attend. But under a state-mandated racial quota, enrollment must be at least 25% white or Asian. This means Black and Hispanic students are turned away if their admission would push minority enrollment above 75%—even if seats remain empty. Representing seven Hartford families, PLF sued to restore the constitutional rights of Black and Hispanic students to have the same educational opportunities as all children in Connecticut.

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Personal Liberties

Nemhauser v. City of Mount Dora

Couple faces bureaucratic “Sorrow” for “Starry Night” mural

What started as artistic expression in Mount Dora, Florida, has escalated into a bureaucratic nightmare for Nancy Nemhauser and Lubomir Jastrzebski. When the couple painted a Van Gogh-style “Starry Night” mural on a wall outside their house, the city declared the art “graffiti” because it didn’t match the color of the house. But when Nancy and Lubomir responded by painting a similar mural on the house, the city branded both as illegal “signs,” and fined them $3,100 with orders to paint over the mural. On behalf of Nancy and Lubomir, PLF is challenging the city. We argue that banning such artistic murals is an abusive interpretation of the city’s sign ordinance, and violates the First and Fourteenth Amendments.

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By Jeremy Talcott

CA Senate considers eminent domain reform

We’ve written extensively about negative developments in California eminent domain use over the years, but today we filed this comment letter with the California Senate Judiciary Committee in support of a positive … ›

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By Jeremy Talcott

Due Process: Criminals vs. property owners

One of America’s most cherished constitutional guarantees is the promise that no one may be deprived of life, liberty, or property without due process of law. Many people know of … ›

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By Jeremy Talcott

Federal judge grants temporary restraining order against city over Starry Night mural

This morning, a federal judge granted our motion for a temporary restraining order against the City of Mount Dora. This puts the $100 a day fines on hold until we have … ›

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By Jeremy Talcott

Family files federal complaint to save their “Starry Night” mural

Today we filed this complaint against the City of Mount Dora, along with emergency motions asking for a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction against the city. We alleged that the … ›

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By Jeremy Talcott

City of Mount Dora fines family, calling an artistic mural an “unpermitted sign”

Mount Dora’s application of the sign code raises significant constitutional issues of free speech, due process, and equal protection.

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By Jeremy Talcott

Coastal Commission pushing city to strip property rights

This week, the California Coastal Commission will be considering proposed updates to the City of San Clemente’s Local Coastal Program.

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