Jeremy Talcott

Attorney Sacramento

Jeremy Talcott joined the Pacific Legal Foundation in 2016. He focuses on property rights, administrative law, and the separation of powers and federalism principles that (ought to) define American government.

Jeremy obtained his undergraduate degree in Communications from the University of Central Florida, but for every minute he spent in classes, he spent five more playing guitar or bass in several noteworthy-for-their-obscurity rock and roll bands. A few tours across the country later, Jeremy realized that he was spending all of his free time reading about the principles of liberty and decided to make a career out of it.

He graduated cum laude from Chapman University, Fowler School of Law in Orange, California, where he was president of the Federalist Society, Senior Articles Editor of the Chapman Law Review, and “that guy who keeps trying to talk about the Constitution” of the Chapman Moot Court team. His two favorite parts of law school were externing for Judge Andrew J. Guilford in the Central District of California and getting the top grade in Administrative Law from his favorite professor.

Jeremy has one extremely funny veterinarian wife, two rambunctious twin boys, three hungry cats, two nervous dogs, and a large pile of unread books, all fighting for his attention. He and his wife are slowly working their way through IMDB’s list of the Top 250 Horror Films of All Time.

Likes: separation of powers, due process

Dislikes: deference, delegation

Desires: long walks in a freer country

Seider v. City of Malibu

Property rights on the line in family’s battle for beachfront signage

Dennis and Leah Seider simply want to alert beachgoers to where the public right of access to the beach ends, the Seiders’ private Malibu property begins, and the way to the nearby public beach. Their best hope to protect their property rights and avoid potential confrontations with beachgoers would be a sign. But that hope faded when they le ...

cement building Adamski v. California Coastal Commission

Builders battle the California Coastal Commission’s basement ban

When Chris Adamski, a Monterey County, California contractor, and his longtime mentor and friend Mike Pietro bought four properties in the county’s Carmel Point neighborhood in 2014, they planned to develop two houses to sell, and then build one house for each of them—Chris for his large family, and Mike for retirement. The California Coast ...

foreclosure Barnette v. HBI, LLC

Taking tax-foreclosed property requires proper notice

In 2002, Walter Barnette was working in the Omaha suburb of Bellevue when he spotted an acre of land in a growing neighborhood. Though he lives across the nearby border with Iowa, he bought the property with the intent of one day building a home. Walter fell on hard times, however, and failed to pay his 2010 and 2011 property taxes—$986.50—to S ...

Shands v. City of Marathon

Government takes family’s land and uses gimmicks to avoid paying for it

The Shands family has owned Shands Key, a small Florida island, since the 1950s. Purchased by World War II surgeon and Mississippi hospital owner Dr. R.E. Shands, the island was originally zoned for residential use and could have been developed with at least seven homes. Today, however, government regulations designed to protect the environment pro ...

Donnelly v. City of San Marino

Holding local California governments accountable for banning “granny flats”

Accessory dwelling units, better known as “in-law apartments” or “granny flats,” have long been recognized as a valuable and essential component of California’s response to the state’s worsening housing shortage. So essential in fact, state law establishes a right to build ADUs, severely limiting local government ...

Warren Lent v. California Coastal Commission

Massive—and unconstitutional—beach access fines threaten family home

In 2016, the Lents received the California Coastal Commission’s first ever fine—$4.185 million—for blocking public access to the beach. The home sits 20 feet above the beach and, without stairs or a ramp, the public cannot safely get to the beach. The property originally included an outdoor stairway and a gate to block the large drop—bo ...

Latest Posts

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September 09, 2019

The First Amendment protects the emoji house and the ‘Starry Night’ house

A Manhattan Beach duplex with a unique paint job has been mired in controversy. A few months ago, Manhattan Beach resident Kathryn Kidd hired a local artist named Z the Art to paint her house in a bright pink color with a pair of cheeky emoji faces. While Kidd enjoys the house, her neighbors have ...

March 29, 2019

Ninth Circuit won’t rehear forced disclosure case

This morning the Ninth Circuit denied Americans for Prosperity Foundation’s petition for rehearing en banc in AFPF v. Becerra. For those who don’t remember, the Foundation sued over a California law that requires tax-exempt nonprofit organizations to hand over an IRS form that contains names and addresses of their donors. The trial cour ...

October 25, 2018

PLF urges SCOTUS review of Hurricane Katrina flooding case

By any measure, Hurricane Katrina was a disastrous natural catastrophe. But for many landowners in St. Bernard Parish, what might have been a damaging but survivable storm was transformed into total devastation by a series of government actions and omissions stretching back decades. Last week, we filed this amicus brief asking the Supreme Court to ...

September 11, 2018

Scope of government’s duty after groundwater ruling is unclear

Originally published in the Daily Journal, September 11, 2018. The 3rd District Court of Appeal recently ruled that the public trust doctrine can apply to groundwater extraction, but the court left some questions unanswered. A recent ruling in the 3rd District Court of Appeal will very likely increase environmental litigation in California and make ...

September 11, 2018

Ninth Circuit remains hostile to free association for conservative groups

This morning the Ninth Circuit released this opinion in Americans for Prosperity Foundation v. Becerra, a case about whether California can demand confidential donor forms from nonprofit organizations operating within the state. Twice the district court has found that the law violates  donors’ First Amendment rights of free speech and associ ...

August 29, 2018

California Court of Appeal imposes public trust obligations on groundwater well permits

This morning a California Court of Appeal issued an unfortunate opinion (although given the state of California courts, perhaps an unsurprising one) affirming in full a trial court decision that imposed public trust obligations on the County of Siskiyou’s issuance of groundwater well permits. The decision could have a significant negative imp ...

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