Oregon Supreme Court cites broad statute in upholding egregious abuse of licensing power

We received an adverse ruling in our lawsuit on behalf of David Hansen, which challenged a ruling by the Oregon Board of Architects that David practiced unlicensed architecture when he … ›

Oregon court rejects claim for public access to private lake

Late last week, Oregon’s court of appeals issued its long-awaited decision in the case, Kramer v. City of Lake Oswego—a case in which two public access activists shockingly claimed that the “public trust doctrine” should be extended to create easements across dry, upland property so that the public can gain access “to . . . navigable waters throughout the State or Oregon . . . regardless of ownership.”

The activists asked the court to force owners of a private, man-made lake to open up their community park to the general public. They argued that the right to recreate in certain waters also gave the public the right to cross over someone else’s land to get there.

Property owners call that trespass. Thankfully, the Oregon court agreed. And nothing in the public trust doctrine will make such a trespass lawful.

Oregonian: Do you need a license to draw pretty pictures?

The Oregonian has published my op-ed on PLF client David Hansen, who was fined $30,000 for making marketing drawings without an architect’s license.  As I write in the op-ed: David’s … ›

PLF argues in Oregon Supreme Court that laws should benefit the public, not cronies

Though occupational licensing laws are often justified in terms of health or safety, studies show that licensing regimes are more often bare attempts by entrenched business interests to protect their … ›

Federal supremacy protects miners' rights

PLF and Western Mining Alliance have filed an amicus brief in the Ninth Circuit case Bohmker v. Oregon. In the brief, we argue that federal mining policy preempts Oregon’s ban … ›

The Center for Biological Diversity goes batty

The Center for Biological Diversity is threatening to sue the Fish & Wildlife Service for not imposing ruinous and unnecessary restrictions on private property owners throughout 37 states to protect … ›

PLF files amicus brief in Oregon “right of access” case

In Oregon—as in most states—a landowner whose property abuts a highway has a right to directly access that road. Thus, an abutting owner is entitled to just compensation when the … ›

PLF files amicus brief in the Oswego Lake public access lawsuit

Today, PLF attorneys filed an amicus brief with the Oregon Court of Appeals in Kramer v. City of Lake Oswego—a case in which two public access activists argue that the … ›

Occupational licensing in Oregon

The Oregonian‘s guest columnist “Portland Aristotle” has an excellent article about the wealth-destroying effects of occupational licensing. A few years ago, PLF helped open the road to economic opportunity in … ›

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Oregon Supreme Court cites broad statute in upholding egregious abuse of licensing power

We received an adverse ruling in our lawsuit on behalf of David Hansen, which challenged a ruling by the Oregon Board of Architects that David practiced unlicensed architecture when he … ›

Oregon court rejects claim for public access to private lake

Late last week, Oregon’s court of appeals issued its long-awaited decision in the case, Kramer v. City of Lake Oswego—a case in which two public access activists shockingly claimed that the “public trust doctrine” should be extended to create easements across dry, upland property so that the public can gain access “to . . . navigable waters throughout the State or Oregon . . . regardless of ownership.”

The activists asked the court to force owners of a private, man-made lake to open up their community park to the general public. They argued that the right to recreate in certain waters also gave the public the right to cross over someone else’s land to get there.

Property owners call that trespass. Thankfully, the Oregon court agreed. And nothing in the public trust doctrine will make such a trespass lawful.

Oregonian: Do you need a license to draw pretty pictures?

The Oregonian has published my op-ed on PLF client David Hansen, who was fined $30,000 for making marketing drawings without an architect’s license.  As I write in the op-ed: David’s … ›

PLF argues in Oregon Supreme Court that laws should benefit the public, not cronies

Though occupational licensing laws are often justified in terms of health or safety, studies show that licensing regimes are more often bare attempts by entrenched business interests to protect their … ›

Federal supremacy protects miners' rights

PLF and Western Mining Alliance have filed an amicus brief in the Ninth Circuit case Bohmker v. Oregon. In the brief, we argue that federal mining policy preempts Oregon’s ban … ›

The Center for Biological Diversity goes batty

The Center for Biological Diversity is threatening to sue the Fish & Wildlife Service for not imposing ruinous and unnecessary restrictions on private property owners throughout 37 states to protect … ›

PLF files amicus brief in Oregon “right of access” case

In Oregon—as in most states—a landowner whose property abuts a highway has a right to directly access that road. Thus, an abutting owner is entitled to just compensation when the … ›

PLF files amicus brief in the Oswego Lake public access lawsuit

Today, PLF attorneys filed an amicus brief with the Oregon Court of Appeals in Kramer v. City of Lake Oswego—a case in which two public access activists argue that the … ›

Occupational licensing in Oregon

The Oregonian‘s guest columnist “Portland Aristotle” has an excellent article about the wealth-destroying effects of occupational licensing. A few years ago, PLF helped open the road to economic opportunity in … ›

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Oregon Supreme Court cites broad statute in upholding egregious abuse of licensing power

We received an adverse ruling in our lawsuit on behalf of David Hansen, which challenged a ruling by the Oregon Board of Architects that David practiced unlicensed architecture when he … ›

Oregon court rejects claim for public access to private lake

Late last week, Oregon’s court of appeals issued its long-awaited decision in the case, Kramer v. City of Lake Oswego—a case in which two public access activists shockingly claimed that the “public trust doctrine” should be extended to create easements across dry, upland property so that the public can gain access “to . . . navigable waters throughout the State or Oregon . . . regardless of ownership.”

The activists asked the court to force owners of a private, man-made lake to open up their community park to the general public. They argued that the right to recreate in certain waters also gave the public the right to cross over someone else’s land to get there.

Property owners call that trespass. Thankfully, the Oregon court agreed. And nothing in the public trust doctrine will make such a trespass lawful.

Oregonian: Do you need a license to draw pretty pictures?

The Oregonian has published my op-ed on PLF client David Hansen, who was fined $30,000 for making marketing drawings without an architect’s license.  As I write in the op-ed: David’s … ›

PLF argues in Oregon Supreme Court that laws should benefit the public, not cronies

Though occupational licensing laws are often justified in terms of health or safety, studies show that licensing regimes are more often bare attempts by entrenched business interests to protect their … ›

Federal supremacy protects miners' rights

PLF and Western Mining Alliance have filed an amicus brief in the Ninth Circuit case Bohmker v. Oregon. In the brief, we argue that federal mining policy preempts Oregon’s ban … ›

The Center for Biological Diversity goes batty

The Center for Biological Diversity is threatening to sue the Fish & Wildlife Service for not imposing ruinous and unnecessary restrictions on private property owners throughout 37 states to protect … ›

PLF files amicus brief in Oregon “right of access” case

In Oregon—as in most states—a landowner whose property abuts a highway has a right to directly access that road. Thus, an abutting owner is entitled to just compensation when the … ›

PLF files amicus brief in the Oswego Lake public access lawsuit

Today, PLF attorneys filed an amicus brief with the Oregon Court of Appeals in Kramer v. City of Lake Oswego—a case in which two public access activists argue that the … ›

Occupational licensing in Oregon

The Oregonian‘s guest columnist “Portland Aristotle” has an excellent article about the wealth-destroying effects of occupational licensing. A few years ago, PLF helped open the road to economic opportunity in … ›

Oregon Supreme Court cites broad statute in upholding egregious abuse of licensing power

We received an adverse ruling in our lawsuit on behalf of David Hansen, which challenged a ruling by the Oregon Board of Architects that David practiced unlicensed architecture when he … ›

Oregon court rejects claim for public access to private lake

Late last week, Oregon’s court of appeals issued its long-awaited decision in the case, Kramer v. City of Lake Oswego—a case in which two public access activists shockingly claimed that the “public trust doctrine” should be extended to create easements across dry, upland property so that the public can gain access “to . . . navigable waters throughout the State or Oregon . . . regardless of ownership.”

The activists asked the court to force owners of a private, man-made lake to open up their community park to the general public. They argued that the right to recreate in certain waters also gave the public the right to cross over someone else’s land to get there.

Property owners call that trespass. Thankfully, the Oregon court agreed. And nothing in the public trust doctrine will make such a trespass lawful.

Oregonian: Do you need a license to draw pretty pictures?

The Oregonian has published my op-ed on PLF client David Hansen, who was fined $30,000 for making marketing drawings without an architect’s license.  As I write in the op-ed: David’s … ›

PLF argues in Oregon Supreme Court that laws should benefit the public, not cronies

Though occupational licensing laws are often justified in terms of health or safety, studies show that licensing regimes are more often bare attempts by entrenched business interests to protect their … ›

Federal supremacy protects miners' rights

PLF and Western Mining Alliance have filed an amicus brief in the Ninth Circuit case Bohmker v. Oregon. In the brief, we argue that federal mining policy preempts Oregon’s ban … ›

The Center for Biological Diversity goes batty

The Center for Biological Diversity is threatening to sue the Fish & Wildlife Service for not imposing ruinous and unnecessary restrictions on private property owners throughout 37 states to protect … ›

PLF files amicus brief in Oregon “right of access” case

In Oregon—as in most states—a landowner whose property abuts a highway has a right to directly access that road. Thus, an abutting owner is entitled to just compensation when the … ›

PLF files amicus brief in the Oswego Lake public access lawsuit

Today, PLF attorneys filed an amicus brief with the Oregon Court of Appeals in Kramer v. City of Lake Oswego—a case in which two public access activists argue that the … ›

Occupational licensing in Oregon

The Oregonian‘s guest columnist “Portland Aristotle” has an excellent article about the wealth-destroying effects of occupational licensing. A few years ago, PLF helped open the road to economic opportunity in … ›