Caleb R. Trotter

Attorney

Sacramento

Caleb Trotter joined Pacific Legal Foundation in September 2015. He primarily litigates cases involving economic liberty, the First Amendment, school choice, and the administrative state.

After growing up in Oklahoma, Caleb moved to New Orleans to attend college at Tulane University. Roll Wave! After witnessing government screw-ups at every level following Hurricane Katrina, Caleb began seriously questioning big government. The laissez faire culture of New Orleans also began to affect Caleb’s views on individualism, and after being introduced to the liberty movement by Reason Magazine, Caleb began to realize that a career in banking was no longer for him. So in 2012, Caleb decided to run for Congress and go to law school so he could advocate and fight for liberty.

Caleb attended law school at Loyola University New Orleans, where he graduated cum laude, served as a member of the Loyola Law Review and moot court program, and was a Federalist Society chapter officer. While in law school, Caleb externed at the Jefferson Parish, Louisiana public defender’s office, and clerked at the Institute for Justice. Those experiences confirmed for Caleb that defending individual liberty through public interest law was the path for him, and working at PLF enables him to do just that.

When he’s not directly fighting for liberty, Caleb can usually be found watching Texas Rangers baseball, performing improv, traveling, or tramping around the wilderness with a camera. Caleb is also an Eagle Scout, and once was nearly clobbered by a golf ball hit by Tiger Woods during the 2001 U.S. Open.

Caleb Trotter joined Pacific Legal Foundation in September 2015. He primarily litigates cases involving economic liberty, the First Amendment, school choice, and the administrative state.

After growing up in Oklahoma, Caleb moved to New Orleans to attend college at Tulane University. Roll Wave! After witnessing government screw-ups at every level following Hurricane Katrina, Caleb began seriously questioning big government. The laissez faire culture of New Orleans also began to affect Caleb’s views on individualism, and after being introduced to the liberty movement by Reason Magazine, Caleb began to realize that a career in banking was no longer for him. So in 2012, Caleb decided to run for Congress and go to law school so he could advocate and fight for liberty.

Caleb attended law school at Loyola University New Orleans, where he graduated cum laude, served as a member of the Loyola Law Review and moot court program, and was a Federalist Society chapter officer. While in law school, Caleb externed at the Jefferson Parish, Louisiana public defender’s office, and clerked at the Institute for Justice. Those experiences confirmed for Caleb that defending individual liberty through public interest law was the path for him, and working at PLF enables him to do just that.

When he’s not directly fighting for liberty, Caleb can usually be found watching Texas Rangers baseball, performing improv, traveling, or tramping around the wilderness with a camera. Caleb is also an Eagle Scout, and once was nearly clobbered by a golf ball hit by Tiger Woods during the 2001 U.S. Open.

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Personal Liberties

D.M. & Z.G. v. Minnesota State High School League

Discrimination dance: “Girls only” school dance team is unconstitutional

When 16-year-old Dmitri Moua discovered dancing, he also found a new way to be a part of a team, and build his self-confidence. But when he wanted to join his high school’s competitive dance team, he was denied because he is a boy. Dmitri’s school is in the Minnesota High School League—whose bylaws declare competitive dance a “girls only” sport. On behalf of Dmitri, Pacific Legal Foundation has filed a federal lawsuit challenging the rule’s constitutionality.

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Property Rights

Kansas Natural Resource Coalition v. Department of Interior

Bad rulemaking threatens good conservation

A buffalo rancher by trade, Ken Klemm also uses his 4,000-acre ranch in Kansas for conservation efforts. In fact, Klemm works with the Kansas Natural Resource Coalition (KNRC) to implement a conservation plan for the lesser prairie chicken. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service considers such local collaboration for determining endangered listings under its 2003 rule called the Policy for Evaluating Conservation Efforts When Making Listing Decisions (PECE Rule). Unfortunately, the rule is not lawfully in effect because the Service never submitted the PECE Rule to Congress as required by the Congressional Review Act (CRA). On behalf of KNRC, PLF has filed a lawsuit demanding that the Service submit its rule to Congress so it can legally take effect and allow good conservation work to continue.

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Property Rights

Tugaw Ranches, LLC. v. U.S. Department of Interior

Illegal rulemaking threatens livelihoods

Like many western U.S. ranching families, the Picketts have worked on the same land in Idaho for many generations and have a thriving business selling naturally raised beef. And like many ranchers, their business depends on grazing permissions on federal land. But their livelihoods are threatened by rules that set aside over 65-million acres of federal land as a habitat for the sage-grouse — an animal that’s neither threatened nor endangered. In fact, sage-grouse management rules eliminate more than 31,000 jobs.

On behalf of the Picketts, Pacific Legal Foundation is challenging illegal rulemaking by government bureaucrats. Agencies implemented the sage-grouse plans without first submitting them to Congress as required under the Congressional Review Act (CRA). PLF argues the rule is unenforceable until the agencies comply with the CRA, and that it should be properly sent to Congress for consideration and, hopefully, eventual disapproval.

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By Caleb R. Trotter

PLF asks 8th Circuit to stop Minnesota from discriminating against boy dancers

Last month, we asked a federal judge in Minnesota to preliminarily enjoin the Minnesota State High School League from prohibiting two high school boys from trying out for their high … ›

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By Caleb R. Trotter

PLF client Freddie Linden wins state dance championship

On behalf of South Dakota high school student and dance phenom Freddie Linden, in April we sued the South Dakota High School Activities Association to put an end to the … ›

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By Caleb R. Trotter

Preliminary injunction sought in Minnesota dance case

Dmitri Moua and Zachary Greenwald are Minnesota high school juniors who love to dance. But due to a state-sanctioned rule in Minnesota, boys are prohibited from trying out for high school … ›

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Op-Ed

Bill to protect work licenses of student loan debtors is welcome development

Originally published by The Hill June 22, 2018. Americans owe nearly $1.5 trillion in student loans, with the average borrower owing around $30,000. Unfortunately, because of a number of factors, about 5 million Americans are … ›

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By Caleb R. Trotter

South Dakota dancing case on hold

We recently noted that in response to our lawsuit on behalf of Freddie Linden, the South Dakota High School Activities Association suspended its rule prohibiting boys from participating in high … ›

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By Caleb R. Trotter

Braiding hair is not a crime

Earlier this year, I noted that the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals endorsed extreme deference to the government when it rejected a challenge by hair braiders in Missouri to the … ›

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