Weiss v. Perez

Professor challenges university’s unlawful viewpoint discrimination

Dr. Elizabeth Weiss, a highly decorated, fully tenured professor of anthropology at San Jose State University (SJSU), specializes in osteology—the study of human skeletal remains. As part of her work, she has published and spoken about the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) and similar laws, which require laboratories ...

National Center for Public Policy Research v. Weber

California’s race quota requires discrimination on corporate boards

By the end of 2021, every company subject to AB 979 must have a minimum of one director from an underrepresented community on its board. By the end of 2022, any company with four or fewer directors must have one underrepresented minority board member, any company with between four and nine directors must have two underrepresented board members, and ...

Total Real Estate Group v. Strode

Real estate brokers fight “love letter” ban for the right to speak freely

At a time when home sales have become a cutthroat business, every bargaining chip matters—to buyers, sellers, and the real estate companies in between. Prospective buyers commonly use so-called "love letters" to move sellers' hearts—and sales—in their direction. ...

Tiegs v. Vilsack

Race-based COVID-19 farm loan forgiveness denies equal treatment to farmers and ranchers across the country

When the pandemic struck, much of the U.S. agriculture industry felt the financial crunch. Julie Owen, James Tiegs, Abraham and Cally Jergenson, and Chad Ward were initially encouraged when Congress passed a COVID-19 relief law that included a farm loan forgiveness provision for economic hardship. But they each discovered that they are ineligible f ...

Dunlap v. Vilsack

Race-based COVID-19 farm loan forgiveness denies equal treatment to Oregon farmer

Katie and James Dunlap are farmers in Oregon who both work two jobs in addition to raising their toddler. The couple rent land from his parents where they raise cattle and hay—an endeavor that required two farm loans to buy cattle and equipment. Like many other farmers, the Dunlaps were negatively affected by COVID and were relieved when they hea ...

Wynn v. Vilsack

Race-based COVID-19 farm loan forgiveness denies equal treatment to farmers

Scott Wynn is a lifelong farmer who has run Wynn Farms in Jennings, Florida, producing sweet potatoes, corn, and cattle since 2006. COVID-19, however, hit the family's finances hard. Steep drops in beef prices and too little help and supplies to grow sweet potatoes meant less income, nearly all of which went toward federal farm loan repayment. A fa ...

The Clementine Co. v. Cuomo, The Clementine Co. v. de Blasio

Mayor de Blasio’s unequal COVID restrictions silence New York theaters, comedy clubs

New York City actress and theater manager Catherine Russell began her starring role in Perfect Crime in 1987. Over that time, she missed only four days—to attend family weddings—a record-setting run of more than 12,000 performances that lasted until March 2020 when the pandemic was declared. At that point, Catherine implemented extensive COVID ...

Kissel v. Seagull

Fighting unconstitutional burdens on free speech in fundraising

Adam Kissel looked forward to lending his longtime experience in the liberty movement and higher education to help raise money for the nonprofit Jack Miller Center's civic education program. But he soon discovered several states have overly burdensome registration and reporting requirements for paid solicitors. Connecticut, in particular, required ...

Ghost Golf, Inc., et al. v. Newsom

Small businesses fight Gov. Newsom’s unlawful color-code shutdown scheme

At Ghost Golf in Fresno, the weeks leading up to Halloween mark the peak season for the haunted house-themed miniature golf center, earning enough money for owner Daryn Coleman and his family to weather the springtime slowdown. This year, however, Ghost Golf has been closed since March, haunted by Governor Gavin Newsom's COVID-related business shut ...