Anastasia P. Boden

Senior Attorney Sacramento

Anastasia Boden is an attorney in PLF’s Economic Liberty Project, where she challenges anti-competitive licensing laws and laws that restrict freedom of speech.

Anastasia’s practice largely consists of representing entrepreneurs and small businesses who find themselves in a bureaucratic nightmare when simply trying to earn an honest living.  One of the most egregious examples of the laws she challenges are Competitor’s Veto laws, which essentially require entrepreneurs to get permission from their competitors before opening their doors.  Anastasia has represented moving, limousine and shuttle companies in Competitor’s Veto lawsuits across the country, achieving legislative reform in Montana, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia.

In addition to litigating, Anastasia testifies before legislatures on the impact of occupational licensing on entrepreneurship.  Her writings on all matters of law and liberty have been featured in the Washington Post, the Chicago Tribune, Forbes, and more.  In 2015, Anastasia was selected for the Claremont Institute’s prestigious John Marshall Fellowship.

A southern-California native, Anastasia earned her B.A. with Dean’s Honors from the University of California, Santa Barbara.  She was drawn east to attend law school at Georgetown, where she was Research Assistant to Professor Randy E. Barnett (aka the “Godfather” of the Obamacare challenge).  Prior to joining PLF, she worked at the Cato Institute’s Center for Constitutional Studies and at Washington Legal Foundation.

When not lawyering, Anastasia can be found playing classical piano, competing at board games, or watching Jeopardy!  She wants everyone to know that the Beatles are better than the Stones.

Anthony Barilla v. City of Houston

Accordionist fights government squeeze on free expression and livelihood

Anthony (Tony) Barilla is a highly accomplished accordionist who wants to busk—that is, perform in public for tips—on the streets of Houston, Texas. A city law, however, prohibits busking activities everywhere except Houston’s very small Theater District. There, artists may accept tips for their performances, but only after completing an ...

Creighton Meland v. Alex Padilla, Secretary of State of California

Fighting California’s discriminatory woman quota law

Last year, California enacted a woman quota law, which requires all publicly traded companies that are incorporated or headquartered in the state to have a certain number of females on their boards of directors. This law ignores that women are making great strides in the boardroom without a government mandate, and therefore perpetuates the myth tha ...

Legacy Medical Transport, LLC and Phillip Truesdell v. Adam Meier, et al.

Family fights crony “Competitor’s Veto” law

Phillip Truesdell and his family launched Legacy Medical Transport in 2017 with one ambulance and high hopes of thriving in the wake of job losses. Their hard work paid off—today, their non-emergency ambulance company in Aberdeen, Ohio, has grown to seven vehicles. Located just miles from the Kentucky border, the company often takes clients from ...

Constitutional Rights of American Indian Peggy Fontenot v. Eric Schmitt, Attorney General of Missouri

American Indian artist seeks to truthfully market her art

Peggy is a member of the Virginia-recognized Patawomeck Indian tribe through her mother’s line and is certified as an artisan by the federally recognized Citizen Potawatomi Nation through her father’s line. In addition to her numerous awards, she has shown and sold her art in museums and galleries throughout the United States, including ...

Minnesota Assoc. Builders and Contractors v. Minneapolis Public School District

Bulldozing unfair, illegal union-rigged construction scheme

With 75 buildings and 35,000 students, there’s plenty of construction work in the Minneapolis School District. But many hardworking Minnesotans never get a shot at a school project. In 2004, the district adopted a project labor agreement, or PLA, that favors politically powerful unions over nonunion contractors. This type of agreement forces ...

D.M. & Z.G. v. Minnesota State High School League

Discrimination dance: “Girls only” school dance team is unconstitutional

When 16-year-old Dmitri Moua discovered dancing, he found a new way to be a part of a team and build his self-confidence. But when he wanted to join his high school’s competitive dance team, he was denied because he is a boy. Dmitri’s school is in the Minnesota State High School League—whose bylaws declare competitive dance a “g ...

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June 15, 2020

The Sun Sentinel: Florida ambulances need flexibility to serve consumers both now and after the pandemic

As Florida re-opens the economy, no one knows quite what to expect. But one thing that's clear is that medical providers must be ready to respond to whatever comes — and quickly. Unfortunately, the state's certificate of need laws stand in the way. Just months ago, Florida's certificate of need requirement prevented a Naples-based ambulance ...

May 19, 2020

Napa County art gallery objects to arbitrary reopening order

Today Pacific Legal Foundation is putting Governor Gavin Newsom and Napa County officials on notice that their reopening plans are arbitrarily depriving individuals of their ability to responsibly resume business, which presents serious constitutional concerns. We've written this letter in support of Quent and Linda Cordair, owners of Quent Cordair ...

May 15, 2020

Santa Clara, California’s misguided ban on COVID-19-safe parades

The County of Santa Clara, California, recently banned peaceful and safe caravans, car parades, and other "drive through" celebrations in an attempt to combat COVID-19. But these events pose little public safety threat and have become a popular way of celebrating during the pandemic. To take just one example, in the wake of many high ...

May 01, 2020

The Wall Street Journal: Government’s Ambulance Chasers

In most states, ‘certificate-of-need' laws stand in the way of new medical facilities and services. One of the most essential responses to a pandemic is ensuring medical providers can adapt quickly to meet new demands. Yet recently an all-female EMT brigade in New York, a family-run ambulance business in Ohio and a fifth-generation ambulance comp ...

April 30, 2020

COVID-19 increases calls to repeal certificate of need laws that limit state’s medical capacities

Medical services are critical during the coronavirus pandemic. But many states artificially limit the number of providers by requiring businesses prove their services are "needed." And who gets to weigh in on that decision? Not their prospective customers, but their established competitors. The Wall Street Journal published an op-ed by Mollie Willi ...

April 06, 2020

Fox Business: Coronavirus puts absurdity of inflexible government regulations in sharp relief

Phillip Truesdell is ready, willing, and able to help with the current pandemic. Together with his family, Phillip operates an ambulance company in Aberdeen, Ohio. With seven trucks, he's well-positioned to take people to the hospital or medical appointments not only in his home state but also a mile away in Kentucky. But the Truesdells ...

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