Anastasia P. Boden

Senior Attorney Sacramento

 

Anastasia Boden is an attorney in PLF’s Economic Liberty Project, where she challenges anti-competitive licensing laws and laws that restrict freedom of speech.

Anastasia’s practice largely consists of representing entrepreneurs and small businesses who find themselves in a bureaucratic nightmare when simply trying to earn an honest living.  One of the most egregious examples of the laws she challenges are Competitor’s Veto laws, which essentially require entrepreneurs to get permission from their competitors before opening their doors.  Anastasia has represented moving, limousine and shuttle companies in Competitor’s Veto lawsuits across the country, achieving legislative reform in Montana, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia.

In addition to litigating, Anastasia testifies before legislatures on the impact of occupational licensing on entrepreneurship.  Her writings on all matters of law and liberty have been featured in the Washington Post, the Chicago Tribune, Forbes, and more.  In 2015, Anastasia was selected for the Claremont Institute’s prestigious John Marshall Fellowship.

A southern-California native, Anastasia earned her B.A. with Dean’s Honors from the University of California, Santa Barbara.  She was drawn east to attend law school at Georgetown, where she was Research Assistant to Professor Randy E. Barnett (aka the “Godfather” of the Obamacare challenge).  Prior to joining PLF, she worked at the Cato Institute’s Center for Constitutional Studies and at Washington Legal Foundation.

When not lawyering, Anastasia can be found playing classical piano, competing at board games, or watching Jeopardy!  She wants everyone to know that the Beatles are better than the Stones.

Anthony Barilla v. City of Houston

Accordionist fights government squeeze on free expression and livelihood

Anthony (Tony) Barilla is a highly accomplished accordionist who wants to busk—that is, perform in public for tips—on the streets of Houston, Texas. A city law, however, prohibits busking activities everywhere except Houston’s very small Theater District. There, artists may accept tips for their performances, but only after completing an ...

Board room Creighton Meland v. Alex Padilla, Secretary of State of California

Fighting California’s discriminatory woman quota law

Last year, California enacted a woman quota law, which requires all publicly traded companies that are incorporated or headquartered in the state to have a certain number of females on their boards of directors. This law ignores that women are making great strides in the boardroom without a government mandate, and therefore perpetuates the myth tha ...

Legacy Medical Transport Legacy Medical Transport, LLC and Phillip Truesdell v. Adam Meier, et al.

Family fights crony “Competitor’s Veto” law

Phillip Truesdell and his family launched Legacy Medical Transport in 2017 with one ambulance and high hopes of thriving in the wake of job losses. Their hard work paid off—today, their non-emergency ambulance company in Aberdeen, Ohio, has grown to seven vehicles. Located just miles from the Kentucky border, the company often takes clients from ...

Constitutional Rights of American Indian Peggy Fontenot v. Eric Schmitt, Attorney General of Missouri

American Indian artist seeks to truthfully market her art

Peggy is a member of the Virginia-recognized Patawomeck Indian tribe through her mother’s line and is certified as an artisan by the federally recognized Citizen Potawatomi Nation through her father’s line. In addition to her numerous awards, she has shown and sold her art in museums and galleries throughout the United States, including ...

contractor Minnesota Assoc. Builders and Contractors v. Minneapolis Public School District

Bulldozing unfair, illegal union-rigged construction scheme

With 75 buildings and 35,000 students, there’s plenty of construction work in the Minneapolis School District. But many hardworking Minnesotans never get a shot at a school project. In 2004, the district adopted a project labor agreement, or PLA, that favors politically powerful unions over nonunion contractors. This type of agreement forces ...

Discrimination Dancing D.M. & Z.G. v. Minnesota State High School League

Discrimination dance: “Girls only” school dance team is unconstitutional

When 16-year-old Dmitri Moua discovered dancing, he found a new way to be a part of a team and build his self-confidence. But when he wanted to join his high school’s competitive dance team, he was denied because he is a boy. Dmitri’s school is in the Minnesota State High School League—whose bylaws declare competitive dance a “g ...

Latest Posts

See All Posts
September 18, 2020

With Justice Ginsburg’s passing, America loses a trailblazer

In losing Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, we lost a trailblazer for equality before the law. Ruth Bader Ginsburg attended law school as one of only a handful of women, and even after graduating first in her class at Columbia, found it difficult to find a job because of her sex. Boy, times have ...

September 17, 2020

Townhall: On Constitution Day, ‘Doing the Work’ should include reading the constitution

Sorting through the various reading lists for "doing the work," that is, educating oneself about race and equality in America, there's one piece that's conspicuously absent: The Constitution. As the nation's most important document devoted to equality, it should top the list. Throughout history, civil rights leaders have relied on the Constitution ...

September 16, 2020

San Francisco Chronicle: Racial quotas have an ugly pedigree. California shouldn’t try to bring them back

"Never admit more than five Jews, take only two Italian Catholics, and take no Blacks at all." These were the instructions of Milton Winternitz, the dean of Yale Medical School, from 1920-1935. Racial quotas have a sordid history. And yet 100 years later, California still hasn't learned. Not long after Dean Winternitz imposed racial quotas ...

September 04, 2020

The Bulletin: Planting flowers shouldn’t be treated as a crime

From helping someone move, to selling lemonade and baked goods, many of us made our first dollar in quintessential summer jobs. But states are increasingly regulating these easy paths to employment. It's not unusual to read about a woman facing jail time for selling homemade ceviche, or a kid threatened with punishment for mowing lawns ...

August 27, 2020

InsideSources: A working mom’s choice to put her kids back into school

Last month, I put my kids back into daycare. Is it because I don't care about my kids and dismiss the risk of COVID-19? Of course not. I care deeply about the well-being of my children and I take the human consequences of the pandemic seriously. But I can also calculate risk and measure tradeoffs. ...

July 17, 2020

The Orange County Register: Newsom, Cosmetology Board should open minds, heads, and doors to the great outdoors

On March 19, 2020, Gov. Newsom issued a stay-at-home and shutdown order, dramatically changing our way of life. The shutdown order was catastrophic for many businesses and their employees, and even worse for the personal services industry, as salons, barbershops, nail salons, and other personal care providers were among the last allowed to reopen. ...

Donate