Anastasia P. Boden

Senior Attorney Sacramento

Anastasia Boden is an attorney in PLF’s Economic Liberty Project, where she challenges anti-competitive licensing laws and laws that restrict freedom of speech.

Anastasia’s practice largely consists of representing entrepreneurs and small businesses who find themselves in a bureaucratic nightmare when simply trying to earn an honest living.  One of the most egregious examples of the laws she challenges are Competitor’s Veto laws, which essentially require entrepreneurs to get permission from their competitors before opening their doors.  Anastasia has represented moving, limousine and shuttle companies in Competitor’s Veto lawsuits across the country, achieving legislative reform in Montana, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia.

In addition to litigating, Anastasia testifies before legislatures on the impact of occupational licensing on entrepreneurship.  Her writings on all matters of law and liberty have been featured in the Washington Post, the Chicago Tribune, Forbes, and more.  In 2015, Anastasia was selected for the Claremont Institute’s prestigious John Marshall Fellowship.

A southern-California native, Anastasia earned her B.A. with Dean’s Honors from the University of California, Santa Barbara.  She was drawn east to attend law school at Georgetown, where she was Research Assistant to Professor Randy E. Barnett (aka the “Godfather” of the Obamacare challenge).  Prior to joining PLF, she worked at the Cato Institute’s Center for Constitutional Studies and at Washington Legal Foundation.

When not lawyering, Anastasia can be found playing classical piano, competing at board games, or watching Jeopardy!  She wants everyone to know that the Beatles are better than the Stones.

Creighton Meland v. Alex Padilla, Secretary of State of California

Fighting California’s discriminatory woman quota law

Last year, California enacted a woman quota law, which requires all publicly traded companies that are incorporated or headquartered in the state to have a certain number of females on their boards of directors. This law ignores that women are making great strides in the boardroom without a government mandate, and therefore perpetuates the myth tha ...

Legacy Medical Transport, LLC and Phillip Truesdell v. Adam Meier, et al.

Family fights crony “Competitor’s Veto” law

Phillip Truesdell and his family launched Legacy Medical Transport in 2017 with one ambulance and high hopes of thriving in the wake of job losses. Their hard work paid off—today, their non-emergency ambulance company in Aberdeen, Ohio, has grown to seven vehicles. Located just miles from the Kentucky border, the company often takes clients from ...

Constitutional Rights of American Indian Peggy Fontenot v. Eric Schmitt, Attorney General of Missouri

American Indian artist seeks to truthfully market her art

Peggy is a member of the Virginia-recognized Patawomeck Indian tribe through her mother’s line and is certified as an artisan by the federally recognized Citizen Potawatomi Nation through her father’s line. In addition to her numerous awards, she has shown and sold her art in museums and galleries throughout the United States, including ...

Minnesota Assoc. Builders and Contractors v. Minneapolis Public School District

Bulldozing unfair, illegal union-rigged construction scheme

With 75 buildings and 35,000 students, there’s plenty of construction work in the Minneapolis School District. But many hardworking Minnesotans never get a shot at a school project. In 2004, the district adopted a project labor agreement, or PLA, that favors politically powerful unions over nonunion contractors. This type of agreement forces ...

D.M. & Z.G. v. Minnesota State High School League

Discrimination dance: “Girls only” school dance team is unconstitutional

When 16-year-old Dmitri Moua discovered dancing, he found a new way to be a part of a team and build his self-confidence. But when he wanted to join his high school’s competitive dance team, he was denied because he is a boy. Dmitri’s school is in the Minnesota State High School League—whose bylaws declare competitive dance a “g ...

regulation of hearing aid in Florida Taylor v. Polhill, et al

Florida’s outdated licensing robs hearing, livelihoods

In Florida, you need a license to sell hearing aids. Dan Taylor of Melbourne, Florida, gave up his license after 30 years, because Florida’s outdated regulations were made for older models, not the updated, technologically sophisticated models he and his customers prefer. In a federal lawsuit on behalf of Dan, PLF argues that Florida’s ...

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November 19, 2019

California’s ‘woman quota’ for corporate boards is an offense against equality and women. Here’s why we’re challenging it.

The online news publication Vox recently brought attention to our lawsuit challenging California's "woman quota" for the boards of publicly traded companies. We're grateful that the article's author, Alexia Fernández Campbell, engages in a thoughtful debate rather than resorting to ad hominem attacks. Still, her article misstates key facts about t ...

October 04, 2019

The Wall Street Journal: Kentucky’s Ambulance Cartel Is Afraid of Phillip Truesdell

Legacy Medical Transport's owner goes to court against a law protecting incumbent firms from competition. Phillip Truesdell is in the nonemergency ambulance business. When people are confined to a stretcher, need an intravenous bag, or are undergoing dialysis, they can't simply hop into an Uber. They need an ambulance to get around. It's an essenti ...

September 23, 2019

The American Dream shouldn’t require a certificate of need

The American Dream, at its core, is about the freedom to compete. That competition allows entrepreneurs to pursue creative ends, and consumers to choose for themselves which products and services meet their needs. Our newest client, Phillip Truesdell, understands well the transformative power of this entrepreneurial freedom, and the pain of its abs ...

September 04, 2019

Los Angeles Times: Setting quotas on women in the boardroom is probably unconstitutional. It also doesn’t work

On September 2, PLF Senior Attorney Anastasia Boden joined the She Thinks podcast to discuss why state-mandated gender quotas for corporate boards are a poor solution for a waning problem. ~~~ California recently became the first state in the nation to require publicly traded companies to include women on their boards of directors. Now Illinois, ...

August 21, 2019

The Orange County Register: California’s concerns about unlicensed blow-drying are overblown

As a teenager, Tanique Bell dreamt of becoming a successful freelance hairstylist. She didn't want to dye hair, or even to cut it. She simply wanted to style it, performing blow-dries and up-dos — hopefully for celebrities. But California's regulatory regime nearly crushed those dreams. Tanique quickly learned that to style hair for a living, ...

July 25, 2019

Five days, four panels about law, liberty, and the Constitution

Last week, on behalf of PLF, I spoke on three panels at FreedomFest, a gathering of the pre-eminent leaders in the liberty movement. We're privileged to work with many of these folks throughout the year, but it's a true honor to share the stage and lead discussions about our successes in empowering everyday Americans' rights. ...

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