Timothy R. Snowball

Attorney Sacramento

Tim Snowball joined Pacific Legal Foundation in September 2017. His practice spans PLF’s issue areas, with a particular focus on individual rights, including Americans’ Fourth Amendment right to be free from arbitrary warrantless searches in the comfort and safety of their homes. Tim is licensed to practice in California, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, and various U.S. District Courts.

Tim graduated with honors from Grossmont College in 2011 with an Associate’s Degree in Political Science. After Grossmont, Tim transferred to UC Berkeley, where he graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in American Government and Politics. After finishing at Berkeley, Tim matriculated to The George Washington University Law School in Washington, DC, where he received his Juris Doctor.

At GW, Tim served as a Notes Editor on the Federal Circuit Bar Journal and coach on the Mock Trial Skills Board. He was also an active member of GW’s chapter of the Federalist Society. Upon graduation, Tim received both the President’s Volunteer Service Award and Pro Bono Service Award for having donated over 500 hours of pro bono service.

Before joining PLF, Tim had stints at the Institute for Justice, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, U.S. Department of Justice, Orleans Public Defenders Office, and over a decade of management experience of both small and large teams.

Tim is a regular op-ed contributor to several national publications, including The Hill, The Daily Caller, and The Daily Journal. Additionally, he has participated in over 80 media interviews on regional and nationally syndicated broadcasts. Tim also regularly provides content on the PLF Blog, and has been featured on PLF’s YouTube channel. He regularly delivers speeches and presentations on the U.S. Constitution, individual liberty, and the rule of law.

When he is not fighting to protect and enforce the Bill of Rights, you can find Tim being a huge film nerd, at the gym, with his nose stuck in a book, or exploring the greater Sacramento area.

Constitutional Rights of public workers Jackson v. Napolitano

California law keeps workers ignorant of their constitutional rights

Last year, the Supreme Court emphasized in Janus v. AFSCME that public employees have a First Amendment right to refuse to pay a union, and “must choose to support the union before anything is taken from them.” Before the state can authorize a union to deduct dues payments from employee paychecks, workers must give their clear permissio ...

Connecticut Parents Union v. Wentzell

Race-based quotas in Connecticut schools hurt Black and Hispanic students

Each year, world-class magnet schools in Connecticut deny admission to thousands of deserving children while leaving available seats empty—because of skin color. State law requires magnet schools’ enrollment to be at least 25 percent white or Asian. This means Black and Hispanic students are turned away if their admission would push minorit ...

Peter Stavrianoudakis, et al., v. United States Department of Fish & Wildlife and California Department of Fish & Wildlife

Falconry regulations run afoul of the Bill of Rights

Peter Stavrianoudakis is a longtime licensed falconer in California who just wants to do what people have been doing for thousands of years—raise and train falcons. But state and federal regulations have become so restrictive, he and fellow falconers around the country are left to choose between their falcons or their constitutional rights. Pacif ...

Gundy v. United States

Congress must do its own job—make laws

The Constitution gives Congress the power to make laws, but not to delegate that power to the Executive Branch. Doing so allows unelected, unaccountable bureaucrats to make rules in violation of the Non-Delegation doctrine. In Gundy, the U.S. Supreme Court will review whether Congress violated the Non-Delegation doctrine by empowering the Attorney ...

D.M. & Z.G. v. Minnesota State High School League

Discrimination dance: “Girls only” school dance team is unconstitutional

When 16-year-old Dmitri Moua discovered dancing, he found a new way to be a part of a team and build his self-confidence. But when he wanted to join his high school’s competitive dance team, he was denied because he is a boy. Dmitri’s school is in the Minnesota State High School League—whose bylaws declare competitive dance a “g ...

regulation of hearing aid in Florida Taylor v. Polhill, et al

Florida’s outdated licensing robs hearing, livelihoods

In Florida, you need a license to sell hearing aids. Dan Taylor of Melbourne, Florida, gave up his license after 30 years, because Florida’s outdated regulations were made for older models, not the updated, technologically sophisticated models he and his customers prefer. In a federal lawsuit on behalf of Dan, PLF argues that Florida’s ...

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September 16, 2019

Why do we still celebrate Constitution Day?

We live in seemingly divisive times. Politicians are at each other's throats. Talking heads on the network news explain to us all the reasons we should hate and mistrust each other. Confidence in public institutions is at an all-time low. There seems to be nothing but bad news. Then we notice an oft-neglected holiday on ...

August 29, 2019

Teaching public universities about free speech

In his famous 1954 defense of free speech, journalist Edward R. Murrow declared "We are not descended from fearful men—not from men who feared to write, to speak, to associate and to defend causes that were, for the moment, unpopular." Murrow's statement embodies the critical role free speech and free thought play in our society. ...

August 13, 2019

Freedom of speech means freedom not to speak, too

Our freedom of speech is woven into the fabric of the Bill of Rights. People have a First Amendment right to speak freely without government interference or compulsion. This freedom also includes the right not to speak for—or pay for the speech of—anything against one's will. Yet many states violate that fundamental right by requiring ...

July 24, 2019

The Founding Fathers of our limited government: Thomas Jefferson and the freedom of speech

This is the fifth in a five-part series dedicated to exploring the lives, ideas, and contributions of the five individuals most directly responsible for the founding of the United States. Without the courageous actions of James Madison, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, George Washington, and Thomas Jefferson, America would not be the country that it ...

July 11, 2019

The Founding Fathers of our limited government: George Washington and the importance of property rights

This is the fourth in a five-part series dedicated to exploring the lives, ideas, and contributions of the five individuals most directly responsible for the founding of the United States. Without the courageous actions of James Madison, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, George Washington, and Thomas Jefferson, America would not be the country that it ...

July 01, 2019

The Founding Fathers of our limited government: John Adams and the principle of equal protection

This is the third in a five-part series dedicated to exploring the lives, ideas, and contributions of the five individuals most directly responsible for the founding of the United States. Without the courageous actions of James Madison, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, George Washington, and Thomas Jefferson, America would not be the country that it ...

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