Timothy R. Snowball

Attorney

Sacramento

A fierce believer that “[o]ne’s right to life, liberty, and property, to free speech, a free press, freedom of worship and assembly, and other fundamental rights may not be submitted to a vote,” Tim Snowball joined Pacific Legal Foundation in 2017.

Tim’s work spans PLF’s practice areas, including cases involving free speech, equal protection, administrative law, economic liberty, and property rights. In particular, Tim has focused upon refuting the so-called warrantless “administrative” search exception to the Fourth Amendment. In addition, Tim is a strong public proponent of education in the areas of constitutional history, limited government, and the rule of law. Tim’s previous legal work includes stints at the Institute for Justice, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, U.S. Department of Justice, and Orleans Public Defender’s Office.

Tim was born in Los Angeles and grew up with his mother and brother in San Diego. A history and politics junky from an early age, Tim graduated with honors from Grossmont College and UC Berkeley with degrees in Political Science and American Government and Politics. After CAL, Tim obtained his J.D. from The George Washington University Law School in Washington, D.C. At GW, he was a Notes Editor on the Federal Circuit Bar Journal, and member of the Mock Trial Skills Board and the GW Chapter of the Federalist Society. Upon graduation, he received both The Presidents Volunteer Service Award and GW Public Interest Service Award.

When he is not fighting to protect and enforce the Bill of Rights, you can find Tim in the gym, debating the finer points of the Star Wars Saga, or with his nose stuck in a book. Tim is currently licensed to practice in California, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of California, and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

A fierce believer that “[o]ne’s right to life, liberty, and property, to free speech, a free press, freedom of worship and assembly, and other fundamental rights may not be submitted to a vote,” Tim Snowball joined Pacific Legal Foundation in 2017.

Tim’s work spans PLF’s practice areas, including cases involving free speech, equal protection, administrative law, economic liberty, and property rights. In particular, Tim has focused upon refuting the so-called warrantless “administrative” search exception to the Fourth Amendment. In addition, Tim is a strong public proponent of education in the areas of constitutional history, limited government, and the rule of law. Tim’s previous legal work includes stints at the Institute for Justice, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, U.S. Department of Justice, and Orleans Public Defender’s Office.

Tim was born in Los Angeles and grew up with his mother and brother in San Diego. A history and politics junky from an early age, Tim graduated with honors from Grossmont College and UC Berkeley with degrees in Political Science and American Government and Politics. After CAL, Tim obtained his J.D. from The George Washington University Law School in Washington, D.C. At GW, he was a Notes Editor on the Federal Circuit Bar Journal, and member of the Mock Trial Skills Board and the GW Chapter of the Federalist Society. Upon graduation, he received both The Presidents Volunteer Service Award and GW Public Interest Service Award.

When he is not fighting to protect and enforce the Bill of Rights, you can find Tim in the gym, debating the finer points of the Star Wars Saga, or with his nose stuck in a book. Tim is currently licensed to practice in California, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of California, and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

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Procedural Guarantees

Gundy v. United States

Congress must do its own job—make laws

The Constitution gives Congress the power to make laws, but not to delegate that power to the Executive Branch. Doing so allows unelected, unaccountable bureaucrats to make rules in violation of the Non-Delegation doctrine. In Gundy, the U.S. Supreme Court will review whether Congress violated the Non-Delegation doctrine by empowering the Attorney General to unilaterally make law. PLF’s supporting brief urges the Court to revive the Non-Delegation doctrine, so Congress can no longer dodge accountability by sloughing off its lawmaking responsibilities.

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Personal Liberties

D.M. & Z.G. v. Minnesota State High School League

Discrimination dance: “Girls only” school dance team is unconstitutional

When 16-year-old Dmitri Moua discovered dancing, he also found a new way to be a part of a team, and build his self-confidence. But when he wanted to join his high school’s competitive dance team, he was denied because he is a boy. Dmitri’s school is in the Minnesota High School League—whose bylaws declare competitive dance a “girls only” sport. On behalf of Dmitri, Pacific Legal Foundation has filed a federal lawsuit challenging the rule’s constitutionality.

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Personal Liberties

Taylor v. Polhill, et al

Florida’s outdated licensing robs hearing, livelihoods

In Florida, you need a license to sell hearing aids. Dan Taylor of Melbourne, Florida, gave up his license after 30 years, because Florida’s outdated regulations were made for older models, not the updated, technologically sophisticated models he and his customers prefer. In a federal lawsuit on behalf of Dan, PLF argues that Florida’s licensing scheme increases cost and reduces access to modern hearing aids—and they’re even preempted by federal laws aimed at reducing unnecessary regulation.

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By Timothy R. Snowball

Here come the California speech police

While the United States has much to thank Great Britain for, including our common law system and our preference for coffee over tea, when it comes to modern politics the … ›

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By Timothy R. Snowball

Food freedom for street vendors and consumers in California

While the football in UC Berkeley’s Memorial Stadium is often ugly, 2017’s game against Weber State occurred on a beautiful fall day. The independent food vendors were out in force … ›

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By Timothy R. Snowball

10 Questions about the U.S. Constitution

Next Monday is Constitution Day, and marks the 229th birthday of the U.S. Constitution. Arguably the most envied, most copied, and most successful founding document in the history of the … ›

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By Timothy R. Snowball

California Legislature finally gets something right

According to the English political philosopher John Locke, “The end of law is not to abolish or restrain, but to preserve and enlarge freedom.” And while we may know and … ›

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By Timothy R. Snowball

Chicago’s GPS tracking rule violates Fourth Amendment property rights (and is super creepy)

Municipal Code of Chicago § 7-38-115(1) (GPS-tracking rule) requires the owners of food trucks operating within Chicago to attach GPS tracking devices to their vehicles as a condition of retaining … ›

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By Timothy R. Snowball

There is no statute of limitations on the Fourth Amendment

According to James Madison, “as a man is said to have a right to his property, he may be equally said to have a property in his rights.” Property rights … ›

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