Timothy R. Snowball

Attorney Sacramento

Tim Snowball joined Pacific Legal Foundation in 2017. His practice is focused on restoring and protecting the separation of powers between government authorities, with a particular focus on Americans’ Fourth Amendment right to be free from unreasonable warrantless searches in the comfort and safety of their  own homes.

In addition to his legal practice, Tim is an advocate for public education in American government and constitutional history. To this end, he has participated in hundreds of media interviews, frequently writes op-eds and some of PLF’s most popular blog posts, and regularly delivers speeches and other presentations on the U.S. Constitution, individual liberty, and the rule of law.

Tim received holds an Associate’s Degree in Political Science from Grossmont College, a Bachelor’s Degree in American Government and Politics from UC Berkeley, and a Juris Doctor from The George Washington University Law School. At GW, Tim received both the President’s Volunteer Service Award and Pro Bono Service Award for volunteering over 500 hours of pro bono service time.

Before joining PLF, Tim had stints at the Institute for Justice, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, U.S. Department of Justice, Orleans Public Defenders Office, and has over a decade of management experience of both small and large teams.

When he is not fighting to protect and enforce the Bill of Rights, you can find Tim being a huge film nerd, at the gym, or exploring the greater Sacramento area.

Ramirez et al. v. Lamont et al.

Connecticut nail salon owner fights for fair treatment under “shutdown” orders

In early March 2020, Luis Ramirez closed his Hartford, CT, nail salon, following Gov. Ned Lamont’s executive orders for statewide shutdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Luis and his wife, Rosiris, have since struggled to earn income and pay rent on their salon. When Luis and Rosiris thought they’d be able to reopen on May 20, they scrap ...

Constitutional Rights of public workers Jackson v. Napolitano

California law keeps workers ignorant of their constitutional rights

Last year, the Supreme Court emphasized in Janus v. AFSCME that public employees have a First Amendment right to refuse to pay a union, and “must choose to support the union before anything is taken from them.” Before the state can authorize a union to deduct dues payments from employee paychecks, workers must give their clear permissio ...

Property Rights Peter Stavrianoudakis, et al., v. United States Department of Fish & Wildlife and California Department of Fish & Wildlife

Falconry regulations run afoul of the Bill of Rights

Peter Stavrianoudakis is a longtime licensed falconer in California who just wants to do what people have been doing for thousands of years—raise and train falcons. But state and federal regulations have become so restrictive, he and fellow falconers around the country are left to choose between their falcons or their constitutional rights. Pacif ...

Gundy v. United States

Congress must do its own job—make laws

The Constitution gives Congress the power to make laws, but not to delegate that power to the Executive Branch. Doing so allows unelected, unaccountable bureaucrats to make rules in violation of the Non-Delegation doctrine. In Gundy, the U.S. Supreme Court will review whether Congress violated the Non-Delegation doctrine by empowering the Attorney ...

Discrimination Dancing D.M. & Z.G. v. Minnesota State High School League

Discrimination dance: “Girls only” school dance team is unconstitutional

When 16-year-old Dmitri Moua discovered dancing, he found a new way to be a part of a team and build his self-confidence. But when he wanted to join his high school’s competitive dance team, he was denied because he is a boy. Dmitri’s school is in the Minnesota State High School League—whose bylaws declare competitive dance a “g ...

regulation of hearing aid in Florida Taylor v. Polhill, et al

Florida’s outdated licensing robs hearing, livelihoods

In Florida, you need a license to sell hearing aids. Dan Taylor of Melbourne, Florida, gave up his license after 30 years, because Florida’s outdated regulations were made for older models, not the updated, technologically sophisticated models he and his customers prefer. In a federal lawsuit on behalf of Dan, PLF argues that Florida’s ...

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August 13, 2020

The Hill: States should pay attention to Supreme Court justices’ comments on ‘reopening’ orders

The scope and duration of the stay-at-home orders issued by state governors this year are unlike any past pandemic orders in American history. So it is not surprising that several hundred lawsuits have been filed around the country to challenge their application in various contexts. A few of those cases have made their way to ...

May 14, 2020

Avoiding government overreach in the COVID-19 recovery

Too often, government makes bad situations worse. States have broad powers to protect the health and safety of their citizens—especially during emergencies like the COVID-19 outbreak, but many overreaching and arbitrary government policies having little to do with public safety have made the situation more painful and destructive than necessary. ...

May 04, 2020

Townhall: Federalism doesn’t pause during a pandemic

As the COVID-19 lockdowns continues to grind on in most states, President Trump has signaled an intense desire for state governors to reopen their respective states. This pressure has ranged from the subtle to the overt. In one particularly alarming development, the president even went so far as to declare that the decision to lift ...

March 30, 2020

The Hill: California’s Newsom is wrong: Martial law is always a last resort

Gov. Gavin Newsom announced that the continued spread of COVID-19 in California could necessitate the imposition of martial law. "We have the ability to do martial law … if we feel the necessity," Newsom stated at a news conference on March 17. But Newsom is mistaken. While the current pandemic presents a public health crisis ...

February 20, 2020

How progressives and conservatives have changed the debate over freedom of speech

Throughout American history, people's views on what should or should not count as protected speech under the First Amendment has waxed and waned along with cultural trends and changing political ideologies. But rarely do we see the viewpoint on certain fundamental rights shift so dramatically. Progressives used to champion the freedom of speech, ev ...

January 27, 2020

Falconers win important first victory in civil liberties lawsuit

In an important first win for the future of falconer freedom, last Friday U.S. District Judge Lawrence O'Neill ruled that the lawsuit against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and California Department of Fish and Wildlife can proceed in court. Refuting the defendants' attempts to dismiss the case in its entirety, Judge O'Neill found that ...

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