Wen Fa

Attorney Sacramento

Wen Fa is an attorney at PLF’s national headquarters. He has litigated numerous direct-rep cases dealing with private property, equality under the law, school choice, economic liberty, and the First Amendment.

Wen’s clients include Edmund, a black fourth-grade boy who wants the chance to attend the same schools as his white neighbors; Adam, a fifth-generation business owner who wants to sell his artisanal butter to Wisconsin consumers; and Andy, a voter who wants to wear a shirt with the words “don’t tread on me” when he votes.

Wen has promoted liberty through speeches to Tea Party groups and a panel debate at Berkeley Law. Wen has appeared on radio over a dozen times, and has been quoted in Reason Magazine. He has published a scholarly article in the William and Mary Bill of Rights Journal and shorter pieces in newspapers and PLF’s blog.

Wen holds a Bachelor’s from the University of Texas at Dallas, a Master’s in Political Theory from the London School of Economics, where he studied under libertarian scholar Chandran Kukathas.  Wen graduated from the University of Michigan Law School in 2013, and worked at Human Rights Initiative in Dallas and Institute for Justice in Austin before joining PLF. Wen is licensed to practice law in California, Texas, and several federal courts, including the Supreme Court of the United States.

Wen is the founder of the Sacramento Chapter of America’s Future Foundation, and a board member of the Sacramento Lawyers Chapter of the Federalist Society.

Outside of work, Wen likes to exercise, play sports, and tell jokes.

First Amendment lawsuit filed in federal court Ogilvie v. Gordon

California’s DMV strays from its own lane to act as speech police

To Chris Ogilvie’s military friends, he’s known as OG—a nickname stemming from boot camp. To his friends back home, Chris is known as Woolf. So, upon his honorable discharge following four tours overseas including Iraq and Afghanistan, the Army veteran bought a car and applied for a personalized license plate spelled “OGWOOLF.&# ...

Kotler v. Webb

California’s next frontier as speech police: your license plate

Jon Kotler is a First Amendment professor at the University of Southern California (USC). He is also a huge fan of the London-based Fulham Football Club and a longtime season ticket holder. Wishing to celebrate the team’s recent success, Jon applied for a personalized license plate with the letters “COYW,” which stands for “ ...

Minnesota Assoc. Builders and Contractors v. Minneapolis Public School District

Bulldozing unfair, illegal union-rigged construction scheme

With 75 buildings and 35,000 students, there’s plenty of construction work in the Minneapolis School District. But many hardworking Minnesotans never get a shot at a school project. In 2004, the district adopted a project labor agreement, or PLA, that favors politically powerful unions over nonunion contractors. This type of agreement forces ...

Ostrewich v. Trautman

Your shirt or your vote: Fighting to protect free speech at the ballot box

When Jillian Ostrewich entered her Houston, Texas, polling place in 2018, she expected the only decisions she’d face would be on the ballot. Instead, an election judge gave her an ultimatum: turn her shirt inside out or forfeit her vote. Similarly, in 2018, a Dallas-area election judge ordered Tony Ortiz to turn his “MAGA” hat ins ...

Christa McAuliffe PTO v. de Blasio

Stopping New York’s attempt to discriminate against Asian-American students

Feeling that New York City’s eight specialized high schools contain too many Asian students, Mayor Bill de Blasio is changing an admissions program to limit the ability of students to get into predominately Asian-American schools. However, his so-called racial balancing effort will squeeze out Asian students—nearly three-quarters of whom co ...

Rentberry v. City of Seattle

Seattle’s unconstitutional rent-bidding law blocks innovation, free speech

Rentberry is a small San Francisco-based startup that connects landlords and renters through a rent-bidding website. The company hopes to expand its service to Seattle, however city council adopted a one-year moratorium on the service over concerns it might violate existing rental law and might inflate housing costs—despite no evidence that eithe ...

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May 26, 2020

San Francisco Chronicle: Preserve Prop. 209: Don’t let racial discrimination return to California

Quick! Close your eyes and think of how coronavirus can be used as a justification for a law that you want to be enacted. Be creative! What's the biggest stretch you can come up with? The entry by California Assemblymember Freddie Rodriguez, D-Pomona, into this dubious contest is "Repeal the California Civil Rights Initiative." In ...

May 04, 2020

The Washington Examiner: States should follow federal government’s lead in waiving racial preferences in contracting, then end them for good

As the coronavirus pandemic rages, the federal government has suspended numerous regulations in order to alleviate burdens on companies performing much-needed work during the crisis and in hopes of boosting the struggling economy. But suspending regulations in response to the crisis also underscores the reality that a great many of these rules are ...

September 13, 2019

Remembering why free speech is important

At a time when freedom of speech seems to be under assault, it's worth stepping back to reconsider why it matters. In a free society, all citizens must be able to pursue their own paths, set their own goals, and think for themselves. Of course, in America and elsewhere, there are norms, orthodoxies, and taboos. ...

September 03, 2019

Yes, the First Amendment protects speech on personalized license plates

Jon Kotler is a professor at the University of Southern California, as well as a First Amendment expert. He's also been a soccer fan since the 1950s, travelling from Los Angeles to London each year to watch his favorite team, Fulham FC, play in their beautiful stadium on the banks of the River Thames. To ...

May 28, 2019

The Hill: Texas said he couldn’t wear a MAGA cap to vote — now he’s suing to protect his rights

Voters face many important choices when they cast their ballots on Election Day. But one choice they shouldn't have to make is between their right to free speech and their right to vote. Yet voters in Texas face exactly that choice, thanks to a state law that gives election workers the power to stop you ...

May 17, 2019

New York Daily News: The right way to honor the legacy of Brown v. Board: Ensure equal access to quality education regardless of race or ethnicity

Sixty-five years ago today, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka. The court held that segregation in schools violated the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment and ordered school districts to admit students on a non-racial basis. In so doing, the court adopted the views ...

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